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Publication numberUS2169713 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1939
Filing dateJun 17, 1937
Priority dateJun 17, 1937
Publication numberUS 2169713 A, US 2169713A, US-A-2169713, US2169713 A, US2169713A
InventorsStroud Charles E
Original AssigneePittsburgh Plate Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double window construction
US 2169713 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aw. 15, w39.

Filed June l7 1937 c. YE.. sTRouD DOUBLE WINDOW` CONSTRUCTION 5 Sheets-Sheet l Aug.' ESI, 15939.

C. E. STROUD DOUBLE WINDOW CONSTRUCTION Filed .June 17, l

5 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR.

BY@ Y@ AORNEYS.

Patented Aug. 15, 1939 DOUBLE WINDOW CONSTRUCTION Charles E. Stroud, Ford City, Pa., assignor to Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Allegheny County, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application June '17, 1937, Serial No.'148,687

5 Claims.

The invention relates to a double window construction involving the use of two spaced panes of glass with the space between the sheets sealed against communication with the atmosphere. The invention has for one of its objects the provision of an improved construction in which the glass sheets are securely held in their frame and sealed, but are at the same time readily-removable for replacement and for cleaning to removemove any deposit of alkaline dust or stain on the inner surfaces of the sheets. A further object is the provision of a construction of the kind specified which does not require the use of screws to place the sealing spacer under compression and hold the parts in assembled-relation, and which is of relatively cheap, simple construction. Certain embodiments of the invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a frontl elevation. Fig. 2 is a section on an enlarged scale on theline II-II of Fig. l. Figs. 3 and 4 are sections showing modi` cations. Fig. 5 is a section through the wedge used in the window construction of Fig 4. And Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are sections showing further modifications.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, 6, 6 are a pair of glass sheets in spaced relation, and I is a metal frame which surrounds and carries the'glass sheets. ed in a spacing and sealing means of yielding material, such as rubber, 'and comprises the spacer 8, the base portion 9, and the edge portion I0. The outer side of the frame is provided with a ledge member I I which opposes the edge of the sheet 6 and the spacer 8.

The sheets are held in assembled relation by means of a plurality of ledge members I2, I3, |3, |11, I4 and I5, which are al1 of the cross sections shown in Fig. 2. 'Ihese members are of metal and each comprise a flange I6 and a base I1 extending transversely of the flange and seated in the recess I8 of the frame. The ledge members are held against outward movement by means of the interlocking shoulders I9 and 20 formed in the frame and on the ledge members respectively.

Tlhe parts are preferably held in assembled relation by means of a wedge 2| which may be of yielding resilient material, such as rubber. The wedge may be a single strip extending clear around the window or it may be made in a plul rality of sections. 'I'he wedge is of such thickness that considerable force is required to press it into position, so that when in such position, it is under compression and places the spacer 8 under compression. This is necessary in order to Ainsure a proper seal between the spacer and the glass sheets and in order to maintain the parts securely in assembled relation. In order to lock the wedge against any possibility of accidental displacement, thin metal clips 22 are provided.

The edges of the glass sheets are mount-v These clips llt at their lower ends into slots 23 in the flanges I6 and at their upper edges are bent over the top of the wedge, as indicated at 24.

In order to disassemble a window for the purpose of cleaning the inner faces of the sheet, or to permit of replacement in case one of these sheets has been broken, the clips 22 are released and the wedge is pulled out progressively starting at one point and working around the window. In case sticking occurs, the cross section of the wedge is reduced by stretching the rubber longitudinally, thus facilitating removal. After the wedge has been removed, the ledge members are removed by tilting the flanges I6, -so that they are close to the face of the sheet 6 which brings the shoulders I9 and 20 out of engagement, thus permitting the members to be moved laterally. Clearance is provided in the recess I8 in the frame, as indicated in Fig. 2, to permit this tilting movement. One or both of the glass sheets may now be removed without diillculty. In reassembling, the-procedure just described is reversed, the glasses being placed in position, followed by the insertion of the removable ledge members bringing them to the position shown in Fig. 2, after which the wedge 2| is forced into p0- sition.

Fig. 3 illustrates a modification, in which both sides of the frame 25 are provided with removable ledge members 26. In this case, the spacing and sealing member 21 is of T cross section. In other respects, the construction follows that of Figure 2. This construction, while somewhat more expensive than that of Fig. 2, has the advantage that the glass may be removed from either side of the frame, and in case of breakage of either sheet, it is only necessary to remove one of the glass sheets, as opposed to the procedure required in the Fig. 2 construction in case it becomes necessary to remove the left hand sheet 6. In such contingency with the Fig. 2 construction, it is necessary to remove both of the glass sheets.

The construction of Fig. 3 also involves a different means for locking the wedges 28, 28 in poto that of Fig. 2 except that a different means is shown for securing the rubber wedge against accidental displacement. To secure this result, the inclined face of the flange I6 ,is provided with teeth which are adapted to interlock with the teeth 3| (Fig. 5) on the wedge 32. To give still greater security against accidental displacement of the wedges, a screw 30 may be employed for I feach wedge, such screw extending through the flange 30 and penetrating the wedge a short distance. While the locking means for the wedges, as heretofore described, are desirable, particularly for large size windows, it is quite feasible to dispense with such locking means, as the wedges are forced in under such pressure that a very considerable amount of force is required to displace them. 'I'he resistance against removal is further increased in the course of time, as the rubber tends to become adherent both to the glass and to the face of the flange.

In the construction shown in Fig. 6, the ledge member 33 has a modified base portion 3l tting in the recess 35 in the frame 36, and such base portion is provided with a. locking rib or shoulder vill fitting beneath a rib 38 on the frame. When the wedge 39 is removed, the ledge member can be tilted so as to permit its ready removal from the frame as in the constructions heretofore described.

The modification of Fig. 7 is on the order of the construction of Fig. 3, as two removable ledge members l0, 40 are employed. In this case, the spacing member between the glass sheets is in the form of a flange Il integral with the frame around which is fitted the rubber sealing means 42. A further departure from the constructions heretofore described, is in the use of the locking strips 43, 43 which are not of wedge cross section. Since there is no wedge action, the edges of the.g1ass sheets must be pressed inward compressing the spacer, before the locking strips are inserted. After their insertion, the spacer which is under compression keeps the locking strips under pressure, so that there'is no danger of their accidental displacement. In this construction,.as well as with those employing the wedge locking strips, the strips may be made of hard or soft rubber or of yielding or unyielding composition, such as fiber formed under high pressure.

The Fig. 8 modification is similar to that of Fig. 6, except as to the means for locking the ledge member M to the frame I5. There are no interlocking ribs or shoulders, as in the other modifications, the locking function being accomplished by the frictionally engaging surfaces at 45a, which may be toothed, as shown, to increase the resistance to relative movement after the parts are assembled with outward pressure applied to the upper end of the ledge member incident to the compression ofthe rubber spacer 46. After, the wedge strip 41 is removed, the member Il is readily removed by tilting its upper edge toward the glass sheets, as described in connection with other forms of the invention,

, clearance being provided at 4I to permit of the tilting.

What I claim is:

l..In combination in a double window oon-` struction, a pair of glass sheets in parallel with yielding spacing and sealing means therebetween ble therefrom when its flange is tilted toward theA glass sheet, and wedges between said flanges and the glass sheets which they oppose, such flanges having their inner faces inclined to t the inlopposition to the edge of the sheet and having a base portion ttinginto the frame in interlocking engagement therewith but releasable therefrom when its flange is tilted toward the glass slleet and wedge means between the flanges of the removable ledge members and the glass sheet, said flanges having their inner faces inclined to fit th'e inclination of the wedge means, and the wedge means and backing up means being under compression.

3. In combination in a window construction, a glass sheet, a frame in which the sheet is mounted, ledge means on one side of the frame in opposition to the edge of the sheet, yielding backing up means between the ledge and the edge of the sheet, ,removable metal ledge members on the other side of the frame, each having a flange in opposition'to the edge of the sheet and having a base portion fitting into the frame in interlocking engagement therewith but releasable therefrom when its flange is tilted toward the glass sheetand wedge means of yielding resilient composition between the flanges of the removable ledge members and the glass sheet, said flanges t having their inner faces inclined to fit the inclination of the wedge means, and the wedge means and dbacking up means being under compression.

4. In combination in a window construction, a glass sheet, a frame in which the sheet is mounted, ledge means on one side of the frame in opposition vto th edge of the sheet, yielding backing up means between the ledge and the edge of the sheet, removable metal ledge members on the other side of the frame, each having a flange in opposition to the edge of the sheet and having a base portion fitting into the frame in interlocking engagement therewith but releasable therefrom when its flange is tilted toward the glass sheet, wedge means between the flanges of the removable ledge members and the glass sheet, and means for locking said wedge means releasably in position, said wedge means and the backing up means being under compression.

5. In combination in a window construction, a glass sheet, a frame in which the sheet is mounted, ledge means on one side of the frame in opposition to the edge of'the sheet, yielding backing up means between the ledge and the edge of the sheet, removable metal ledge members on the other side of the frame, each having a flange in opposition to the edge of the sheet and having a b ase portion fitting into the frame in interlocking engagement therewith but releasable therefrom when its nange is tilted toward the glass sheet, wedge means between the flanges of the removable ledge members and the glass sheet, and means for locking said wedge means releasably in position, said flanges having their inner faces inclined to fit the inclination of the wedge means, and the wedge means and backing up means being under compression.

CHARLES E. STROUD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2575854 *Oct 21, 1946Nov 20, 1951Adlake CoSash
US2599811 *Jan 29, 1948Jun 10, 1952Edouard ClerkWindow sash
US2635523 *Mar 25, 1950Apr 21, 1953Hunter Sash Company IncVentilator sash unit
US2725606 *May 20, 1952Dec 6, 1955Persson Eric SigfridSash frames with two or more window panes
US2993242 *Jan 20, 1958Jul 25, 1961Aluco Bauelemente PatentgesellDouble-glazed assemblies for windows and doors
US3382613 *Oct 28, 1965May 14, 1968Ernst KollerSash frame and sash assembly
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US8122654May 12, 2008Feb 28, 2012C.R. Laurence Company, Inc.Taper lock system
US8181405Jun 8, 2010May 22, 2012R&B Wagner, Inc.Partition mounting system and clamp assembly for mounting partition
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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/204.595, 52/766, 49/489.1, 52/775
International ClassificationE06B3/64
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/64
European ClassificationE06B3/64