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Publication numberUS2170531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1939
Filing dateSep 21, 1936
Priority dateSep 21, 1936
Publication numberUS 2170531 A, US 2170531A, US-A-2170531, US2170531 A, US2170531A
InventorsKahn Julian
Original AssigneeKahn Julian
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for mixing a liquid with a gas
US 2170531 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 22, 1939.

A( -fJ' I I I I I I ATToRNl-:Y

Aug. 22, 1939. J. KAHN APPARATUS FOB MIXING A LIQUID WITH A GAS Filed Sept. 2l, 1936 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Julzan Kahn ATTORNEYS Aug. 22, J. KAHN APPARATUS FOR MIXING A LIQUID WITH A GAS Filed Sept. 21, 1936 3 SheBtS-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Julian Kahn for like purposes, by

Patented Aug. 1939 UNITED sTATEs PATENT GFFICE 2.110.531 y APPARATUS Foa ma s mourn wrrn Julian Kahn, New York, N. Y.

Application September 2l, 1936, S'ellNo. 101,783

17 Claims.

This invention relates to apparatus for home use for mixing a liquid with a gas, and more particularly to apparatus for whipping cream, or f. the cream and gas mixture through a constrlct'ed orifice.

The primary object of my invention is to generally improve apparatus of the foregoing character. A more particular object is to greatly increase the operating economy of this class of apparatus, by arranging the same for successive llings of gas from a conventional commercial cylinder of gas, in contrast with the use of a miniature bulb which can be used only once and must then be discarded. The present arrangement is not only far less costly. but results in a uniform gas pressure within the apparatus, re-

gardless of the amount of liquid originally placed therein. A further object oi' my invention resides in the provision of a protective device or safety valve for preventing excess pressure within the apparatus. For purposes of economy, the protective device may be made in the form of a safety valve or pop valve, and in accordance with one of the objects and features of my invention the said device is provided with suitable indicator means, preferably means producing an audible whistle in order to announce when the apparatus has been lled with -gas to the correct pressure.

Still another object of my invention is to greatly simplify the apparatus by using a single valve for two purposes, first, as an inlet valve when charging the container with gas, and second, as a constricted and somewhat labyrinthian passage for causing frothing or whipping of the cream and gas mixture. In other words, a single passage and a single valve is all that is needed for the container or vessel in which the cream and gas mixture is kept. Moreover, the said valve may be and preferably is of a simple commercially available type commonly employed in automobile tires, that is, the valve may be an ordinary tire air valve such as the commercial Schrader or Dill valve. I have found that this character of valve actually produces better whipping of the cream than is produced by more elaborate special mechanisms which have beenused for this purpose and which cannot function for feeding gas into the container.

Cream whipping devices of this character have not proven popular for ordinary home use. irst, because of the upkeep expense oi' the individual bulbs of gas previously referred to, and second, because of the high price of the apparatus itself. Moreover, the container is made of metal and is less desirable than glass for direct contact with cream.

Further objects of my invention are to overcome the foregoing objections and to provide a small inexpensive attachment which may be detachably applied to an ordinary glass bottle such as is commonly used for rada. pop, ginger ale, or the like. The bottle acts as the storage container for the cream and gas, while the attachment seals the bottle and functions to whip the cream during its dischcarge. In accordance with still further and more detailed objects of my invention, the quantity of whipped cream left in the nozzle or discharge passage of the apparatus is minimized to a negligible quantity; no siphon is needed; and the cream in the bottle may be exhausted to the very end, without waste.

To the accomplishment oi' the foregoing and other objects which will hereinafter appear. my invention consists in the apparatus elements and their relation one to the other as hereinafter are more particularly described in the specication and sought to be defined in the claims. The specication is accompanied by drawings in which:

Fig. l is a side elevation of one form oi apparatus embodying features of my invention;

Fig. 2 isa section taken in elevation through the same:

Fig. 3v is a horizontal section taken in the plane a0 -of the line 3 3 of Fig. l;

Fig. 4 shows the manner in which the bottle is charged with gas from a conventional commercialcylinder, and further shows one form of protective device disposed between the cylinder and the bottle l Fig. 5 illustrates a modified protective device equipped with a whistle signal;

Fig. 6 illustrates a modiedprotective device equipped with a gas pressure indicator;

Fig. 'l is a side elevation showing the application of an attachment or adaptor to a conventional device for making charged beverages at home;

Fig. 8 is a section taken in the plane of the 45 line 8-8 of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 shows a modified attachment which may be used for whipping cream or for making a charged beverage; and Y Fig. 10 is a section taken in the plane of the 5o line lil-III of Fig. 9.

Referring to the drawings and more particularly to Figs. 1, 2, and 3,'the apparatus comprises a container I2 having a single tube il (Fig. 2) leading thereinto. Tube Il is preferably inter- 35 nally threaded and has screwed therein a valve IB which may be and preferably is a conventional tire air valve. Typical comercial valves are the Schrader and the Dill valves, that here shown being of the latter type. It will be noted that the valve pin Ill is faced outwardly so that gas may be supplied into container Il, the valve at that time opening automatically. This, of course, is done after a suitable quantity of cream has been placed in container I2 and the container has been sealed. To produce whipped cream, it isf merely necessary to tip container I2 over until tube Il ls pointed downwardly. and to thereupon slightly open valve I6, as by depressing pin i8. In the present case this is done by a control lever 2l) which, when pressed toward the container, opens the valve, thus permitting some of the cream to escape under pressure of the gas within the container. Because the passage through the valve is constricted and complex, the cream is well whipped during its discharge. Probably the improved result which I obtain is caused by the fact that the cream and gas mix- A ture is passed through successive constrlctions,

first. around the end 12 of the valve; second, past the valve seat 2l; third, along the valve stem I8 and through the valve spring 28; and fourth, around the guide bridge 30 of the valve pin I8.

Considering the arrangement in greater detail, container I2 preferably is an ordinary glass bottle such as is commonly used for soda pop, Coca Cola, ginger ale, or the like. In fact, any bottle having a standard neck 32 may be employed. The size of the bottle is without significanoe except that it should be substantially larger than' the amount of cream to be placed therein. This, of course, simply means that any convenient size of bottle may be used, but that the bottle is to be only partially filled with cream. A small ginger ale or Coca Cola bottle is especially convenient because it is easily handled and tipped.

'I'he attachment to be placed on bottle I2 includes a cap or base 34 flanged at 36 and provided with a suitable sealing gasket 3l. Any oi a number ot known clamps may be used to lock the cap on bottle I2. In the present case an operating handle III is pivoted on diametrically opposite sides of the cap at l2 and carries a clamp wire Il which passes through a guide slot 46 at one side of the cap. A part of clamp wire Il is indented at Il to bear directly beneath the bead at the mouth of the bottle. It will be understood that the parts are so dimensioned that when handle 40 is raised, the cap is released, but that when handle Il is forced downwardly the cap is locked in place, with gasket 38 pressed tightly against the mouth of the bottle.

Cap 3l is formed on its upper side with a threaded base 5B which in turn is surmounted by the threaded tube or pipe Il. This pipe is internally threaded to receive the tire air valve I6, as was previously described. It is externally threaded to facilitate charging the bottle with gas, as will be subsequently described.

A discharge nozzle 52 is slid over the outside of tube Il. Nozzle 52 is held in place by a retaining member 54 the lower end of which is internally threaded to mate with the externally threaded boss 50. Retaining member 64 carries bearings 56 through which passes a pin 58. Operating lever 20 is biiurcated at B0 (Fig. 3) to pass around the retaining member il, and an integrally formed inwardly projecting arm I! is arrasar fulcrumed on pin 58. The innermost tip 6I of arm 62 bears against the bottom of a recess 66 in the side of nozzle 52. Within nozzle 52 is placed a yieldable or compressibie tube 68 the lower edge of which bears against the top of tube Il. Nozzle 52 also carries a valve pin depressor 'III the lower end of which is disposed directly over the upper end of valve pin I8. The parts are so proportioned that valve pin I 8 is normally cleared by depressor lil, thus permitting the valve to close. However, when handle 20 is depressed toward bottle I2, the arm 64 moves nozzle 52 downwardly a slight amount against the resistance of sleeve 6B. This causes the valve pin deprcssor III to depress pin I8, thereby slightly opening the valve. It will be understood that the bottle is inverted at this time, resulting in a discharge of whipped cream. (The valve pin is referred to as depressed, although, in fact, it is raised when the bottle is inverted.)

Referring now to Fig. 4 of the drawings, the bottle is charged with a suitable and preferably inert gas, say, carbonl dioxide or nitrous oxide, from a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, the upper end of which is indicated at 12. This cylinder may be small and easily handled, it being, say of the six-ounce size. Even a three-ounce cylinder, while very small, is very many times more economical to use than the individual bulbs of gas heretofore supplied for previous cream whipping devices.

Cylinder I2 has a standard outlet 1l directly beneath which ls a valve the control collar of which is shown at 16. The valve is operated by rotating handle lil. These parts are all supplied with and form a part of the standard commercial cylinder 12. Revertlng briefly to Figs. l and 2, when the bottle l2 is to be newly charged some cream is poured therein, cap 34 is applied to the bottle neck and locked in place, and inlet pipe I4 is exposed. To expose pipe I4, the retaining member 5l is unscrewed from the threaded boss or seat ill. Nozzle 52 and handle 20 all come oi! with the retaining member and together form an assembly which is handled as a single piece. Referring now to Fig. 4, the gas from the cylinder 'I2 is supplied by a short flexible pipe 80 to the tube or pipe Il forming a part of cap 34. Pipe III terminates in a threaded thumb screw or coupling member 82 which may be of the type commonly employed on automobile tire pumps and the like. Member 82 is simply screwed directly on the tube or pipe Il.

To prevent excessive pressure within bottle I2, any suitable protective device B4 may be nterposed between cylinder 12 and bottle i2. In the present case I show a safety valve or relief valve comprising a housing 86 having a valve seat 88 on which a valve 9|! bears, said valve being provided with a gasket 92. The valve is normally pushed downwardly to closed position by a compression spring 94 housed within a cap 96. The cap 9G is externally threaded, and housing IE is internally threaded to receive the same. The tension of spring 94 is adjusted by the extent to which cap 96 is screwed into the housing. This adjustment may be locked by a suitable lock nut 98. The lower end of housing 86 is provided with a threaded nipple "l0 which is screwed directly into the upper end or outlet I4 on cylinder 12. Pipe It is connected to the side oi housing 8G at IBI, as shown. It will be manifest that if cylinder valve IB is kept open until an excessive pressure is reached, valve 80 is elevated against spring Il, thereby affording relief of the pressure. The releasedV gas escapes throimhl opening |84 in cap 88. and, if desired, a further relief opening |80 may be provided through the side of the housing. i

- In order to eliminate undue waste of gas from cylinder 18, it is desirable to provide some form of indicator to show when the safety valve has opened. Referring to Fig. 5,'1 show a relief valve almost exactly like that shown in Fig. 4, except that auxiliary discharge opening |06 is eliminated and a perforated concave washer |08 is inserted between the top of cap 86 and compression spring 84. Washer |08 together 'with the top of cap 86 forms a whistle, and consequentlyA when gas escapes upon opening of the safety valve, a distinct whistle is heard. thus notifying the operator that the bottle has been suiiiciently charged with gas and that the main valve 10 on the cylinder should be shut olf. If desired, some grooves may be formed on the valve body to facilitate the escape of gas, this being especially desirable if the valve is not dimensioned to have considerable clearance around its periphery.

Referring now to Fig. 6, I show still another form of protective device comprising a safety valve ||0 like those previously described but provided at one side with a pressure-gauge lil. Pressure gauge III is connected to the safety valve by a suitable passage schematically indicated at 4. This passage is, of course, located beneath the valve seat. 'I'he gauge is provided with an indicator needle I6, and when the needle approaches an indication on the face of the gauge dial showing the desired pressure, the main valve shut on. The relief valve ||0 is adjusted to open at a pressure a little higher than the desired pressure. With this arrangement it is unnecessary to waste any of the gas from the cylinder for signalling purposes.

Referring now to Figs. 9 and l0, I show a modiiled attachment in which the operating means for' slightly opening the tire air valve is simpler than the operating means shown in Figs. 1. 2 and 3. In the present form of the invention, I provide a cap |20 with means |82 for detachably applying the same to a bottle |24, Just as previously described. Cap |20 is surmounted by a tube or pipe |26 internally and externally threaded at |28, much as previously described. A tire air valve |80 is screwed into tube |28.

'I'he operating means differs in comprising a nozzle |32 the base of which is enlarged to form a thumb nut |84. This is internally threaded to fit over tube |20. Nozzle |82 is provided with a valve pin depressor |86. A gasket |80 is preferably disposed between the nozzle |81 and tube |28. When nozzle |82 is lightly screwed onto tube |28, depressor |36 does not quite reach the valve pin. To discharge whipped cream, lt is merely necessary to invert the bottle and to tighten thumb nut |84 for a fraction of a turn. 'I'his causes a slight depression of the valve pin, with consequent escape of cream. Gasket |30 limits the opening of the valve, and this gasket is accordingly tightly fitted within thumb nut |34 to prevent loss. 'Ihe arrangement may, of course, be made without gasket |80, but the use of a yieldable gasket is preferable in order to indicate when nozzle |82 has been screwed in place suillciently to be ready for operation but without yet actually opening the valve.

Those features of they present invention which are directed to making it conveniently possible to use gas from acommercial cylinder rather than from small individual bulbs, are also applicable to the charging of beverages with gas. Referring to Fig. 'l of the drawings, I show a conventional apparatus for carbonating water. Typical commarcial forms of such apparatus are those called "Sparklet and Soda King". The apparatus comprises a bottle |40 surmounted by a cap |42 having a discharge nomle |44 ow to which is controlled by a valve handle, not shown but located opposite support |40. Gas is supplied to the bottle through an inlet pipe |48 threaded at |50 to receive a cradle or housing (not shown) which carries an individual gas bulb or tube and forces the same against a perforating needle located inside of inlet pipe |48. When the cradle is not in use, the thread |50 may. if desired, be covered by a cap |52. Y

In accordance with my invention, I provide a fitting or attachment |64 the nature of which is best shown in Fig. 8. This attachment is enlarged at its lower part to form a thumb nut |56 which is internally threaded at |50 to fit over the thread |00 of the bottle. An internal skirt or nange |60 may be provided adapted to bear against a gasket |62 in inlet |48, thereby insuring a gas-tight connection. Attachment |64 is reduced in diameter and externally threaded at |64 to receive the coupling 82 of gas supply hose 80. The latter is schematically indicated in broken lines in Fig. 7, and, of course, is identical with the corresponding parts shown in Fig.l4. Moreover. it will be understood that a protective device like those shown in Fig. 4, 5, or 6, is combined with hose 80 in order to limit the pressure supplied to the bottle |40.

I prefer to thread the attachment |54 internally, as is indicated at |06, thereby adapting the same to receive a tirey air valve |68. This forms an extra seal against escape of gas from bottle |40, It will be understood, however, that the attachment may also be used without the tireair valve IBB, reliance then being placed on the valve winch is ordinarily provided within inlet |50 oi the bottle. One-advantage of using the tire air valve is to adapt the attachment for bottles of this character of a somewhat more old-fashioned type in which gas inlet |48 is not provided with a valve. In such case the tire air valve IBB becomes the sole valve for sealing the bottle against escape of gas after hose 80 has been removed.

Before concluding, I may point out that an attac'hment such as I have illustrated in Figs. 9 and 10, may also be used for charging beverages. The admission of gas is accomplished just as previously described. The bottle is then shaken and the carbonated beverage may be released by opening the tire air valve, much as previously described, although for the present purpose the valve is preferably opened more Widely than is the case when whipping cream. While the beverage is constricted somewhat during its discharge, this is not undesirable and, in fact, has the advantage of ilzzing" the beverage, much like special commercial ilzzeis sometimes used to liven up ordinary bottled beverages.

It is believed that the construction and operation, as well as the many advantages of my improved apparatus for mixing a liquid with a gas, or, more particularly, for whipping cream, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description thereof. I'he necessary apparatus is small, simple and inexpensive to manufacture. A single valve is used both for inlet of gas and for discharge of the mixture, and this valve may be an inexpensive tire air valve. Despite the cheapness of the valve used, the whipped cream produced is of excellent quality. The gas is obtained cheaply by drawing the same from standard commerclal cylinders, rather than from special individual bulbs of gas. The mixture is kept in glass, which ls desirable for sanitary reasons, and also because the amount of liquid in the container may be observed at any time. The container is particularly inexpensive, it being an ordinary bottle of standard type. Danger of breaking the bottle by excessive pressure is eliminated by a suitable protective device, and wastage of gas from the cylinder may also be guarded against. It is unnecessary to use a syphon, although apparatus like the present may, of course, be designed to use a syphon. The pressure to which the bottle is filled is uniform regardless of the quantity of liquid placed in the bottle. (When using individual bulbs, the ultimate pressure varies with the amount of liquid in the bottle because the content of the bulb is predetermined.) The present apparatus permits the whipping of a small amount of cream, and even the last few drops of cream in the bottle may be utilized. Moreover, the length of nozzle beyond the valve is particularly small, and the quantity of whipped cream exposed beyond the valve is therefore a minimum. This is desirable because the whipped cream in the nozzle is exposed to air and may tend to spoil, I'here ls very little contact of the cream with metal. When using a small bottle, the apparatus occupies but little space in a refrigerator. In addition to whipping cream, the apparatus may be used to carbonate water or other beverages; to make a pancake mixture; and for other purposes which will readily suggest themselves.

It will be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in preferred forms, many changes and modifications may be made in the structures disclosed, without departing from the spirit of the invention, dened in the following claims. For example, the cap may be made large in `diameter to ilt a large mouthed bottle, specifically a standard quart or pint milk bottle. A tube may be provided depending from the cap, to act as a siphon tube, but in such case the valved pipe and the cream discharge nozzle are preferably shaped to discharge the cream sidewardly or downwardly, rather than upwardly. The elimination of the siphon tube, however, makes for convenience, simplicity, and cheapness.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus for whipping cream (or for like purposes) by mixing the cream with a gas under pressure and discharging the same through a constricted passage, a conventional tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed'position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being evena more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve acting as an inlet valve when lling the apparatus with gas, and also acting as a constricted passage-way when discharging the cream and gas mixture, a discharge nozzle for guiding the whipped cream from the tire air valve, and means accessible outside the discharge nome for slightly depressing the pin of the tire air valve.

2. Apparatus for the whipping oi' cream or for like purposes, said apparatus comprising a container having a discharge tube leading therefrom, a conventional tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a. valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being screwed into said tube with the valve pin projecting outwardly, and control means accessible outside the discharge tube for depressing the valve pin in order to cause the valve to act as a constricted discharge passageway.

3. Apparatus for the whipping of cream or for like purposes,\said apparatus comprising a container having a gas inlet tube leading thereinto, a conventional tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valveV pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being screwed into said tube, ywith the valve pin projecting outwardly, whereby the valve acts as an inlet valve when charging the container with gas, additional control means for only slightly depressing .the valve pin in order to permit the valve to act as a constricted discharge passageway during the ejection of the cream and gas mixture, and a yleldable stop member made oi' rubber or the like, against which said control means presses and which must be compressed by said control means before said valve pin opens,

thereby preventing accidental opening of the valve.

4. Apparatus for whipping cream or for like purposes, said apparatus comprising a container which is fully enclosed except for a single pipe leading therefrom, a conventional tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage. and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed,`

said tire air valve being screwed in said pipe and so Laced as to hold gas in the container, a valve pin depressor capable of only limited movement,

land an operating handle for moving the delng a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat. a pin extending through said tube at both ends. a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being screwed into said pipe and so faced as to hold gas in the container, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipeiA outside said valve, a valve pin depressor xedly secured in said nozzle, and an operating handle for moving the nozzle relative to the pipe in order to cause a limited depression of the valve pin.

6. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck, a pipe leading through said cap, a valve in said pipe so faced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor in said discharge nozzle, and an operating handle for moving the depressor against the valve pin.

'1. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck, a single ppe leading through said cap, a tire air valve of standard type including a slender tube having lts inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end o said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constricted passage. and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being screwed into said pipe and so faced as to hold gas within the bottle, a valve pin depressor, and an operating handle for moving the depressor against the valve pin.

8. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck, a pipe leading through said cap, a tire air valve of standard type screwed into said pipe and so faced as to hold gas Within the bottle, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor ilxedly secured in said discharge nozzle, and an operating handle for moving the discharge nozzle relative to the pipe until the valve pin is depressed.

9. A household attachment comprising a cap having releasable attachment means making the same removably applicable to a bottle, a pipe projecting from said cap, a valve in said pipe so faced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge nozzle reciprocably positioned over said pipe, a retaining member detachably secured to said cap for holding the nozzle in place over the pipe, an operating handle movably mounted on said retaining member and arranged to depress the nozzle relative to the pipe and retaining member, and a valve depressor secured to said nozzle for opening the valve upon operation of the handle.

l0. An attachment or accessory for whipping cream or for like purposes, said attachment comprising a cap having releasable attachment means making the same removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck. a threaded pipe projecting from said cap. a tire bottle, a discharge nozzle reciprocably positioned over said pipe, a retaining member screwed onto said cap for holding the n'ozzie in place over the pipe, an operating handle pivotally mounted on said retaining member and arranged to depress the nozzle relative to the 'pipe and retaining member, and a valve pin depressor secured to said nozzle for limitedly depressing the valve pin upon operation oi the handle.

li. An attachment o1 accessory for whipping cream or for like purposes, said attachment comprising a cap having releasable attachment means making the same removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck. an internally and externally threaded pipe projecting from said cap, a tire air valve of conventional type screwed into said pipe and so faced as to hold gas within the glass bottle, a discharge nozzle having an enlarged rotatable base internally threaded to be received over the external thread of the pipe, and a depressor in said nozzle arranged to slightly or limitedly depress the pin o! the air valve when the nozzle is screwed all the way onto the pipe.

12. Apparatus for the whipping oi' cream or i'or like purposes, said apparatus comprising a container having a gas inlet tube leading thereinto, a conventional tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of. said pin for bearing against the inner end o! said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin i'or urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a comparatively constrlcted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being screwed into said tube, with the valve pin projecting outwardly, whereby the valve acts as an inlet valve when charging the container with gas, additional means for slightly depressing the valve pin in order to permit the valve to act as a constricted discharge passageway during the ejection of the cream and gas mixture, a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, a protective device secured to the discharge opening oi' the cylinder, and an outlet from said protective device adapted to be detachably secured over the aforesaid gas inlet tube, said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the apparatus from the gas cylinder.

13. Apparatus for whipping cream or for like purposes, said apparatus comprising a container which is fully enclosed except for a pipe leading therefrom, a valve in said pipe so faced as to hold gas in the container, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipe outside said valve, a valve depressor in said nozzle, an operating handle for moving the nozzle relative to the pipe in order to cause opening of the valve, a conventional commercially available cylinder of. gas, a protective device secured to the discharge opening of the cylinder, an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the aforesaid pipe when the nozzle is removed. said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the container from the gas cylinder, and indicator means to indicate when the desired container pressure has been reached.

14. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck. a pipe leading through said cap, a valve in said pipe so faced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge noaale removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor in said discharge nomie, an operating handle for moving the depressor against the valve pin, a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, a protective device secured to the discharge opening o! the cylinder, an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the aforesaid pipe. said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the bottle from the cylinder.

15. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neckl a. pipe leading through said cap, a tire air valve of standard type screwed into said pipe and so laced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor ilxedly secured in said discharge nozzle, an operating means for moving the discharge nozzle relative to the pipel until the valve pin is depressed, a protective device adapted to be secured to the discharge opening ot a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, and an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the aforesaid pipe, said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the bottle from the gas cylinder.

16. In combination, a conventional commercially available cylinder oi gas. a protective device secured to the discharge opening oi the cylinder, an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the gas inlet tube oi a household apparatus for mixing a gas and a liquid, said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the apparatus from the gas cylinder, said protective device comprising a safety valve or pop valve including a movable valve loaded by a compression spring the tension of `arhich is adjusted to desired value, and means causing gas released upon opening of the valve to produce a distinguishing whistle.

17. Apparatus for charging a beverage with a, gas. said apparatus including a fitting adapted to be received over the conventional threaded gas inlet pipe of ordinary home carbonating units, a tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a. comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being disposed in said fitting, a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, a pressure-limiting protective device connected directly to the outlet ofthe cylinder, and a ilexible discharge pipe from said protective device adapted to be detachably secured to the aforesaid fitting, whereby the beverage container may be repeatedly filled from the single cylinder of gas.

JULIAN KAHN.

Disclaimer 2,l70,53l.-Julm Kahn New York, N. Y. Arnna'rus ron MIXING A LIQUID Wrrn A GAS. by the inventor.

atent dated Aug. 22, 1939. Disclaimer filed July 1, 1949,

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims l, 2, 3, and 4 of said patent.

[om Gama Auml z, 1949.1

14. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neck. a pipe leading through said cap, a valve in said pipe so faced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge noaale removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor in said discharge nomie, an operating handle for moving the depressor against the valve pin, a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, a protective device secured to the discharge opening o! the cylinder, an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the aforesaid pipe. said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the bottle from the cylinder.

15. A household attachment comprising a cap removably applicable to a glass bottle having a standard neckl a. pipe leading through said cap, a tire air valve of standard type screwed into said pipe and so laced as to hold gas within the bottle, a discharge nozzle removably applied over said pipe, a valve pin depressor ilxedly secured in said discharge nozzle, an operating means for moving the discharge nozzle relative to the pipel until the valve pin is depressed, a protective device adapted to be secured to the discharge opening ot a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, and an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the aforesaid pipe, said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the bottle from the gas cylinder.

16. In combination, a conventional commercially available cylinder oi gas. a protective device secured to the discharge opening oi the cylinder, an outlet from said protective device adapted to be secured over the gas inlet tube oi a household apparatus for mixing a gas and a liquid, said protective device operating to limit the maximum pressure which may be applied to the apparatus from the gas cylinder, said protective device comprising a safety valve or pop valve including a movable valve loaded by a compression spring the tension of `arhich is adjusted to desired value, and means causing gas released upon opening of the valve to produce a distinguishing whistle.

17. Apparatus for charging a beverage with a, gas. said apparatus including a fitting adapted to be received over the conventional threaded gas inlet pipe of ordinary home carbonating units, a tire air valve including a slender tube having its inner end acting as a valve seat, a pin extending through said tube at both ends, a valve part secured to the inner end of said pin for bearing against the inner end of said tube, and a return spring coiled about said pin for urging the valve to closed position, the passage through said tube around said pin being a. comparatively constricted passage, and the passage between said valve part and valve seat being even more highly constricted when the valve pin is only slightly depressed, said tire air valve being disposed in said fitting, a conventional commercially available cylinder of gas, a pressure-limiting protective device connected directly to the outlet ofthe cylinder, and a ilexible discharge pipe from said protective device adapted to be detachably secured to the aforesaid fitting, whereby the beverage container may be repeatedly filled from the single cylinder of gas.

JULIAN KAHN.

Disclaimer 2,l70,53l.-Julm Kahn New York, N. Y. Arnna'rus ron MIXING A LIQUID Wrrn A GAS. by the inventor.

atent dated Aug. 22, 1939. Disclaimer filed July 1, 1949,

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims l, 2, 3, and 4 of said patent.

[om Gama Auml z, 1949.1

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2719660 *Feb 10, 1950Oct 4, 1955Ellis John MMethod of preserving packaged materials
US2828050 *Jul 28, 1955Mar 25, 1958Engelder Arthur EGas flow control unit
US3035617 *Jan 9, 1957May 22, 1962American Nat Bank And Trust CoFuel transfer adapter with dual valve actuator
US3131733 *Jan 27, 1961May 5, 1964Oil Equipment Lab IncDevices for transferring pressurized liquid between containers
US3522928 *Nov 8, 1968Aug 4, 1970Teknova AsFixture comprising a socket to be mechanically secured on the end of a tubular member,such as the discharge spout of a gas bottle
US4526730 *Jan 31, 1983Jul 2, 1985Cochran Daniel MHome carbonating apparatus
US5056676 *Jan 4, 1991Oct 15, 1991Allen HerbertBottle cap for repeatable airtight sealing
US5102627 *Oct 18, 1989Apr 7, 1992The Coca-Cola CompanySupply of controlled medium-pressure CO2 gas in simple, convenient, disposable packaging
US5186902 *May 18, 1990Feb 16, 1993The Coca-Cola CompanySupply of controlled, medium-pressure CO2 gas in simple, convenient disposable packaging
US5188257 *Oct 31, 1991Feb 23, 1993The Coca-Cola CompanySupply of controlled, medium-pressure carbon dioxide gas in simple, convenient disposable packaging
US5270069 *Oct 31, 1991Dec 14, 1993The Coca-Cola CompanyMethod for supplying carbonating gas to a beverage container
US5350587 *Nov 29, 1993Sep 27, 1994The Coca-Cola CompanyMethod of dispensing carbonated beverage using a gas generator
US5439038 *Jul 2, 1993Aug 8, 1995Consumer Product Technologies, Inc.Carbonated beverage containers pressurizing device
US6276545 *Sep 23, 1998Aug 21, 2001Marisa MarchignoliLever actuated universal stopper for opened bottles
US9352949May 22, 2015May 31, 2016GrowlerWerks, INC.Beverage dispenser and variable pressure regulator cap assembly
US20100028515 *Nov 7, 2007Feb 4, 2010Michael GormleyRe-carbonating device
US20110215485 *Mar 8, 2010Sep 8, 2011Steinberg Benjamin HHome carbonator designed to work with used consumer product bottles; especially used drink bottles
US20120137631 *Dec 2, 2010Jun 7, 2012Shlomo HaimiNon-carbonated drink bottle pressurization cap
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/20, 251/340, 285/354, 426/477, 222/39, 215/280, 222/545, 426/474, 366/182.1, 366/340, 222/3, 261/DIG.160, 141/25, 285/355
International ClassificationA47J43/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/16, A47J43/128
European ClassificationA47J43/12K