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Publication numberUS2170881 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1939
Filing dateFeb 9, 1938
Priority dateFeb 9, 1938
Publication numberUS 2170881 A, US 2170881A, US-A-2170881, US2170881 A, US2170881A
InventorsWerts Richard A
Original AssigneeElwin B Hall, Virgil P Baker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas anchor
US 2170881 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. A. WERTS Aug. 29, 1939.

GAS ANCHOR 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Feb.

www m5 u m w y R. A. WERTS Aug. 29, 1939.

GAS ANCHOR Filed Feb. 9, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Aug. 2,9?, 1939 UNITED sTATEs- PATENT OFFICE amsn 1 4 css ANcnoa vil-gn P. mer i Application February 9, 1938, SerialA No. 189,598

s emma.' (ci. 10s-zzn) This invention relates to well pumping apparatus and relates more particularly to a gas anchor for use in connection with a well pump. A general object of the invention is to provide a sim- 5 ple, practical and effective gasanchor.

In the pumping of oil wells there is often considerable sand and free gas present that materially decreases the eiiiciency of the pump. Devices known as gas anchors are sometimes provided for use with the pumps to lessen or prevent the entrance of the sand and free gas to the pump barrels. While the typical gas anchors are quite elective in operation it is usually necessary to withdraw the pump and the string of tubing from the well from time to time to remove the accumulated sand from the anchors.

Another object of this invention is to provide a gas anchor for a well pump that may be cleaned or freed of sand, etc., without pulling the tubing or the pump from the well.

Another object of this invention is to provide a gas anchor in which the solid matter or sand that may have accumulated therein may be easily and quickly washed out by merely lifting the pump from its shoe to allow the column of liquid in the tubing to brush back through the anchor and carry away the accumulated solid matter.

Another object of this invention is to provide a gas anchor of the character mentioned that permits a bottom hole pressure instrument to be run to the bottom of the well following the removal of the pump and without pulling the string of tubing from the well.

Another object of this invention is to provide 35 a gas anchor of the character mentioned that is such that the well may be washed to its bottom when necessary without pulling the tubing from the well.

A further object of this invention is to pro vide a gas anchor that is simple in construction and operation.

The various objects and features of my invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of a typical preferred form 45 and application of the invention, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal detailed sectional view of the improved gas anchor of the present in- 50 vention in position on a tubing and enclosing a typical well pump showing a portion of the pump broken away to appear in vertical cross section. Fig. 2 is a view similar to Flg.`1 illustrating the pump raised from its shoe to allow 55 the liquid in the tubing to rush back through the anchor. Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal detailed sectional view of the lower portion of the gas anchor and the valve means associated with the pump illustrating the parts in the normal po- 60 sitions. Fig. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary lon- Lli) gitudinal detailed sectional view of the upper portion of the anchor and the pump anchoring means showing the pump anchor mandrel in-a raised position and Fig. 5 is an enlarged, transverse, detailed sectional view taken as indicated by line 5 5 on Fig. 1.

'Ihe improved gas anchor of the present invention is adapted for use in connection with practically any form of oil well pump. -In the drawings I have illustrated a typical preferredform of the invention associated with a conventional standing barrel form of pump P, it being understood that the invention is not to be construed as limited or restricted to the particular form or application illustrated in the drawings.

Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings illustrate the lower portion of a string of tubing T extending into the producing portion of an oilwell W. The tubing T is provided at its lower end with a typical pump shoe S having a tapered upwardly facing internal seat I0 and a downwardly facing internal shoulder I I. The shoe S is threaded onto the tubing T so that its upper end presents or forms an upwardly facing external shoulder I2 on-the tubing. 'I'he pump P is removably suspended from the tubing T. The pump P includes the usual barrel I3 and the tubular plunger I4 operable in the barrel I3. An anchor mandrel I5 is provided on the upper end of the barrel I3 and has a ilexible grooved cone I6 adapted to be sprung under the shoulder II to removably lock the pump P in place. A tapered head II is provided on the mandrel I5 and ls adapted to engage downwardly against the seat I0 to support the pump P and to seal oif the lower end of the tubing T. The sucker rod or operating rod R for reciprocating the plunger I4 is connected with the upper end of the plunger I 4 through the medium of a rod section 9. The plunger I4 has a valve V discharging in'to the barrel I3. A guide G on the head I1 slidably guides the rod section 9 and is ported to discharge fluid from the pump barrel I3 into the tubing T. The pumped fluid is admitted to the lower end of the barrel Ill in the manner to be hereinafter described.

'I'he improved gas anchor of the present invention comprises, generally, a case or body 29 surrounding the pump P to provide a fluid charnber C and receiving the well fluid from its upper end, means 2| for suspending the body 20 from the tubing T and a valve 22 associated with the pump P and normally closing the lower end of the body 20.

The body 2n is provided to enclose or surround the well pump P with substantial clearance and thus leave the fluid receiving reservoir or chamber C from which the pump P draws its supply of liquid. In accordance with the simple preferred ,form of the invention illustrated thebody 20 is an elongate tubular structure formed of one or more lengths oi! pipe or tubular stock. The body 2|! is considerably larger in diameter than the pumplbarrel I3 and the tubing T, and is suillciently long to extend from a point above the shoe S to a. point beyond the lower end oi' the pump P.. A head or cap 23 is provided on the lower end of the body 2li. The cap 23 has a wall 24 that tapers downwardly and inwardly to a central opening 25. A bevelled seat 26 is provided on the wall 24 at the upper end of the opening 25'. The wall of the opening 25 may slope downwardly and outwardly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the device.

The means 2| for suspending the anchor body 20 from the tubing Tis such thatthebody and the tubing are related for relative vertical'movement. The means 2| includes a sleeve 21 arranged on the lower portion of the tubing T. The sleeve 21 is slidable or shiftable on the tubing and its lower end is adapted to bear against the:

above described shoulder I2 of the shoe S. The means 2| further includes a plate or ring 28 surrounding the sleeve 21 and connected with the sleeve and the body 20. The ring 28 may be xed to the sleeve 21 and the body 20 in any suitable manner, for example it may be welded to those members. The parts are preferably related so that the upper end of the anchor body 20 is above the shoulder I2 when the sleeve 21 rests downwardly against the shoulder. This relationship is clearly illustrated in the drawings. The ring 28 is perforated or provided with a plurality of spaced openings 29 to allow the liquid from the well to iiow over the upper end of the body 20 into the chamber C.

The valve 22 is provided to normally close the opening 25 in theA cap 23 to prevent the entrance of the well fluid to the lower end of the chamber C. In accordance with the invention the valve 22 is slackly connected with the pump P to be opened or raised from the seat 26 when the pump P is pulled or raised. The means for connecting the valve 22 with the pump P includes a connecting member 30 threadedly connected with the lower end of the pump barrel I3. The standing valve 8 of the pump P may have its seat 1 resting on the upper end of the member 30. 'Ihe member 30 has a longitudinal opening 3| communicating with the lower end of the barrel I3 and a plurality of ports 32 place the passage 3| in communication with the chamber C so that liquid from the chamber may be drawn into the pump barrel I3. A tubular guide 33 is threaded to the lower end of the connecting member 30 and is provided at its lower end with a plug 34. A central vertical opening 35 is provided in the plug 34 and a mandrel 36 is slidable or shiftable vertically in the opening. A head 31 is provided on the upper end of the mandrel 36 and slidably cooperates with the interior of the guide 33 to assist in guiding the mandrel 36. The head 31 is cooperable with the plug 34 to limit downward movement of the mandrel 36. Bleeder ports 38 preferably communicate with the upper and lower parts of the opening in the tubular guide 33 to permit free movement of the head 31.

The valve 22 is secured to the lower end of the mandrel 36. In practice the valve 22 may be a simple, tapered or frusto-conical member designed to seal downwardly against the seat 26. The parts are related and proportioned so that the valve 22 cooperates with the seat 26 to close the opening 25 when the sleeve 21 bears downwardly against the shoulder I2. A helical spring 39 surrounds the exposed lower portion oi' the mandrel 36 and is arranged under compression between the plug 34 and the valve 22. The spring 39 urges the valve 22 against its seat 26 to assure the proper action o! the valve when the pump P is in operation.

During operation of the pump P the parts are in the positions illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawings with the sleeve 21 resting on the shoulder I2 to carry the body 20 and with the valve 22 closing the opening 25. The liquid in the well flows over the vupper end of the body 20 into the chamber C and as the pump operates the liquid is drawn through the ports 32 and discharged from the guide G into the tubing T. It will be apparent how the anchor body 2|! serves to prevent, to a large degree, the entrance of free gas and sand to the barrel I3 of the pump'.

After a period of operation of the pump solid matter and sand may accumulate in the lower portion of the chamber C and it may become necessary or desirable to flush out this accumulated material. The anchor body 20 may be fully cleared of accumulated solid matter by merely stopping operation of pump P and raising the pump rod R to lift the pump P to a position such as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings. The pump P may be readily raised by means of the rod R to lift the cone I1 from the seat IIJ to free the head I6 from the shoulder II. With the pump P in a position such as shown in Fig. 2

of the drawings the columns of liquid standing in the tubing T is free to rush down through the shoe S into the chamber C. The above described raising of the pump P lifts the valve 22 from the seat 26 and the liquid from the tubing 'I' is free to flow down through the chamber C and discharge from the opening 25. This uid iiowing downwardly through the chamber C at a relatively high velocity carries with it the accumulated sand and solid matter. The pump P may be readily lowered to its original position such as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings tocondition it for further operation.

' If it is desired to run a bottom hole pressure instrument into the lower portion of the well the rod R is raised to pull the pump P from the well. The withdrawal of the pump P from the well, of course, leaves the opening 25 open to the Well and the well pressure instrument may be lowered through the tubing T and the body 20 to pass throughl the opening 25 into the lower portion of the well bore. The tapered or inclined wall 24 effectively guides the instrument through the opening 25. When a reading has been taken the instrument may be withdrawn in the usual manner and if desired, the pump may be run into the well and reseated in the shoe S for further operation'. i

In lthe event it becomes desirable or necessary to wash the lower portion of the well bore the pump rod R is raised to withdraw the pump P from'the well. The tubing T is then lowered and Water or the like is pumped down through the -tubing T to discharge from the opening 25. This Water or uid discharged into the well from the opening 25 eifectually washes the well. In the event that an accumulation or bridge of sand is encountered by the cap 23 the engagement of the cap with the accumulated matter may hold the anchor body 2|Il against downward movement. The continued downward movement of the tubing T brings the lower end of the shoe S against the inclined wall 24 and the pumped fluid from the tubing T is discharged directly through the opening 25. 'This fluid discharging from the opening 25 may have a considerable velocity and is effective in breaking or washing away the sand bridge. Following the cleaning of the well bore the tubing T may be returned to the desired 1ocation. It will be observed that the sleeve 21 cooperating with the shoulder I2 causes the anchor body 20 to move upwardly with the tubing T. The well pump P may again be run through the tubing T and seated in the shoe S for further operation.

Having described only a typical preferred form and applica-tion of my invention I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any variations or modifications that may appear to those skilled in the art or fall within the scope of the following claims.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A gas anchor for use in combination with a tubing and a pumpremovably suspended therefrom, the anchor including a body forming a reservoir from which the pump receives its fluid, the upper portion of the reservoir being directly open to the well to receive fluid therefrom, the body having an opening in its lower end, means suspending the body from the tubing, and a valve carried by the pump and normally closing said opening.

2. A gas anchor for use in combination witha tubing having a shoulder and a well pump removably suspended from the tubing. the said anchor comprising a body defining a fluid chamber from. which the pump draws its fluid, the upper end of the chamber being directly open to the well to reecive iiuid therefrom, said body having an opening in its lower end communicating with the lower portion of the chamber and the well, means on the body cooperating with said shoulder to support the body on the tubing and shiftable on the tubing to allow relative longitudinal movement between the body and tubing, and a valve connected with the pump to normally close said opening and movable to an open position by raising the pump.

3. A gas anchor for use in combination with a tubing and a pump removably suspended therefrom, the anchor including a body surrounding the pump with clearance to provide a chamber around the same, the upper portion of the chamber lbeing open to the well, the body having an opening placing the lower end of the chamber in communication with the well, and a spring urged valve slackly connected with the pump to normally close said opening and movable to an open position when the pump is raised.

4. A device of the character described for use in combination with a well tubing having a shoe and a pump removably anchored in the shoe, the

device comprising a hollow body providing a reservoir from which the pump receives its fluid. the upper end of the body being directly open to the well and there being an opening in the lower end of the body for discharging downwardly into the well, means connecting the body with the tubing, a valve for closing the said opening. and means connecting the valve with the pump to be withdrawn from the opening upon withdrawal of the pump from the well to leave the opening clear for the passage of an object into the well.

5. A device ot the character described for vuse in combination with a well tubing having a shoe and a pump removably anchored in the shoe, the device comprising a hollow body forming a reservcirfromwhichthepimpnceivesiteuid. the

upper end of the body being directly open to the well and there being an opening in the lower end of the body for discharging into the well, means connecting the body with the tubing including a sleeve shiftably surrounding the tubing and adapted to rest on the shoe, and a connection between the sleeve and body, a valve for closing the said opening, and means connecting the valve with the pump to be withdrawn from the opening upon lifting oi' the pump or withdrawal of the pump from the well.

6.A device of the character described for use in combination with a well tubing having a shoe and a pump removably anchored in the shoe, the device comprising a hollow body receiving the pump to provide a reservoir thereabout, the upper end of the body being open to the well and there being an opening in the lower end of the body for discharging into the well, means connecting the body with the tubing, a valve for closing the said opening, and means connecting the valve with the pump to be withdrawn from the opening upon lifting of the pump or withdrawal of the pump from the well whereby fluid in the tubing may discharge through said opening, the last mentioned means comprising a stem on the valve and a slack connection between the stem and the pump.

'1. In well pumping equipment comprising tubing, a shoe on the lower end of the tubing, a well pump, an anchor on the pump cooperable with the shoe to suspend the pump from the tubing, the combination of a hollow body open at its upper end to directly receive uid from the well and forming a reservoir from which the pump draws its fluid, thebody having an opening in its lower end, means connecting the body with the tubing, a valve for closing said opening, and a connection between the valve and the pump whereby raising the pump opens the valve to allow the liquid in the tubing to flow down through the body and discharge from the opening.

8. In well pumping equipment comprising tubing, a shoe on the lower end of the tubing, a well pump, an anchor on the pump cooperable with the shoe to suspend the pump from the tubing, the combination of, a hollow body open at its upper end to receive fluid from the well and enclosing the pump to form a reservoir therefor, the body having an opening in its lower end,

means connecting the body with the tubing, a

valve for closing said opening, a slack connection between the valve and the pump whereby raising of the pump opens the valve to allow the fluid in the tubing to discharge the body and the opening, and spring means normally holding the valve closed.

9. In well pumping equipment comprising tubing, a shoe on the lower end of the tubing, a well pump. an anchor on the pump cooperable with the shoe to suspend the pump from the tubing, the combination of a hollow body open at its upper end to receive fluid from the well and enclosing the pump to form a' reservoir therefor, a wall across the lower end of the body having an opening for placing the reservoir in communication with the well, a valve for normally closing the said opening, a connection between the valve and pump whereby the valve is movable with the pump, and means shiftably supporting the body on the tubing whereby the shoe and said wail may be brought into cooperation following removalofthepumptoprovideforthedischarge otiluidfrom thetubingthroughsaidopening.,

RICKARDLWIRTB.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2525233 *Jun 16, 1947Oct 10, 1950Miller Sidney AGas and oil separator
US2526086 *Oct 19, 1945Oct 17, 1950Sanders Joseph OSand flusher
US3149671 *Jul 16, 1962Sep 22, 1964Gem Oil Tool Company IncVelocity joint and container
US3963073 *Jun 25, 1975Jun 15, 1976Laval Claude CPurging apparatus
US7000694Jun 4, 2003Feb 21, 2006Crews Gregory AOil anchor
US20040244987 *Jun 4, 2003Dec 9, 2004Crews Gregory A.Oil anchor
US20060076143 *Nov 30, 2005Apr 13, 2006Crews Gregory AOil anchor
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/105.1, 92/82, 210/534, 166/332.1, 166/105.5
International ClassificationE21B43/34, E21B43/38
Cooperative ClassificationE21B43/38
European ClassificationE21B43/38