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Publication numberUS2171509 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1939
Filing dateMar 26, 1938
Priority dateMar 26, 1938
Publication numberUS 2171509 A, US 2171509A, US-A-2171509, US2171509 A, US2171509A
InventorsArthur L Peterson
Original AssigneeGeo F Cram Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Terrestrial globe mounting
US 2171509 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1939. A L, PETERSON 2,171,509

TEBRESTRIAL GLOBE MOUNTING Filed March 26, 1938 INYENTOR.

ATTORNEYJ.

Patented Aug. 29, 1939 TERRESTRIAL GLOBE MOUNTING Arthur L. Peterson, Indianapolis, Ind., assignor to The Geo. F. Gram Company, a corporation of Illinois Application March 26, 1938, Serial No. 198,191

4 Claims.

meridian ring.

It is one of the objects of my invention to provide a terrestrial globe and meridian ring so mounted that the globe itself may more readily be observed than the types of globes now used.

Another object of my invention is to provide a mounting for terrestrial globes and its accompanying meridian ring, whereby the meridian ring may be more readily seen and read than has heretofore been the case particularly with the globe inclined on its polar axis.

Heretofore, particularly in the commercial art, the terrestrial globes have been so mounted in their meridian ring that it has been inconvenient and, to a large extent, impracticable to observe the parallels of latitude with the graduate lines or indications on the meridian ring.

It is one of the objects of my invention to provide a mounting for the meridian ring and globe so that the above objections may be overcome.

of mounting the globe;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged front elevation of a portion of the globe mounting; and

Fig. 4 is an elevation of a globe similar to that illustrated in Fig. 1, except that interior illumination for the globe is provided.

In the embodiment illustrated, having particular reference to Figs. 1, 2 and 3, I provide a stand I which may be formed of sheet metal or other like material, having an upwardly extending center pedestal 2.

Laterally extending from this pedestal is an arm 3 which is preferably slightly curved to conform to the curvature of the globe and the globe and its associated meridian ring are mounted at the outer end of this arm.

In the structure illustrated,

ed at the end of the arm 3.

This bolt extends upwardly through the meridian ring and projects into a south polar opening in the globe 4 so that in mounting the parts, the globe may be first inserted in the meridian ring receiving the north polar pin 6 and the meridian ring, 5 then screw threaded on to the pin or bolt 8, the bolt projecting through the south polar opening in the globe. By this arrangement, the globe and meridian ring are both held in proper assembled position. With the bolt 8 screwed up 10 tight into the enlarged boss 1 in the meridian ring 5, the meridian ring is securely clamped upon the arm 3 and held in fixed position against rotation on the arm so as to maintain the ring against rotation on the polar axis of the globe l and in the position illustrated in the drawing.

The assembly is such that the meridian ring lies in a plane having an inclination coincident with the polar axis of the globe. Therefore, with the structure placed upon a desk or other 20 stand, it will be observed that the side 9 of the lobe and the side of the meridian ring are presented in such position as to be more readily observed than would be the case if the globe was arranged vertically or if the globe was arranged with the meridian ring as is usual. The globe and the meridian ring are mounted to be presented to the reader in much the same manner as a book or other article is placed upon a reading desk, with the portions of the globe 30 with the indicia on the meridian ring more directly in line with the vision of the observer.

Furthermore, it will be noted that, due to the fact that the meridian ring is arranged in a. plane inclined coincidentally with the polar axis 5 of the globe, the sides of the meridian ring, particularly one side thereof, are in a position to be more readily observed by the observer than is usually the case and the parallels of latitude may readily be read in connection with the indicia 40 which are formed on the sides of the meridian ring.

In Fig. 4, I have illustrated a modification of the structure illustrated in Fig. 1 wherein the parts are mounted in the same assembled rela- 45 tion except in this instance the globe is carried, at its bottom, on a supporting disc Ill fixed to the meridian ring and there is mounted on the meridian ring, in such a manner as to project within the globe, a lamp socket l I adapted to 50 receive an illuminating lamp 12. Likewise, in this structure, the globe itself may be formed of translucent material.

I claim as my invention:

1. A terrestrial globe comprising a globe adapt- 55 ed to be supported to rotate on its polar axis, a stand, a globe supporting ring mounted on said stand, normally held against rotation on the polar axis of the globe and arranged in a plane inclined at an angle coincident with the polar axis of the globe and a terrestrial globe, mounted within said meridian ring and supported to rotate on its polar axis.

2. A terrestrial globe comprising a globe adapted to be supported to rotate on its polar axis, a stand, a supporting arm extending laterally from said stand, a globe supporting ring mounted on said arm and normally held against rota.- tion on the polar axis of the globe and arranged in a plane inclined at an angle coincident with the polar axis of the globe, and a terrestrial globe mounted within said meridian ring and supported to rotate on its polar axis.

3. A terrestrial globe comprising a globe adapted to be Supported torotate on its polar axis, a

stand, a globe supporting meridian ring mounted on said stand and normally held against rotation on the polar axis of the globe, arranged in a plane inclined at an angle coincident with the polar axis of the globe and having indicia on its upper face, and a terrestrial globe mounted within said ring and supported to rotate on its polar axis.

4. A terrestrial globe comprising a globe adapted to be supported to rotate on its polar axis, a stand, a globe supporting meridian ring mounted on said stand normally held against rotation on the polar axis of the globe and arranged in a plane inclined at an angle concident with the polar axis of the globe, the upper face of said ring being flattened and having indicia thereon, and a, terrestrial globe mounted within said meridian ring and supported to rotate on its polar axis.

ARTHUR L. PETERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4141156 *Sep 6, 1977Feb 27, 1979The Dolly Toy CompanyGlobe lamp with circumnavigating aircraft
US4790756 *Sep 29, 1987Dec 13, 1988The Quaker Oats CompanyWorld globe geographic area viewer
US20080199840 *Feb 21, 2007Aug 21, 2008Abdulkarim Ali Al-MotawwahEducational apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/145, D26/94, 362/809
International ClassificationG09B27/08
Cooperative ClassificationY10S362/809, G09B27/08
European ClassificationG09B27/08