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Publication numberUS2172035 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1939
Filing dateMar 11, 1937
Priority dateMay 22, 1936
Publication numberUS 2172035 A, US 2172035A, US-A-2172035, US2172035 A, US2172035A
InventorsRoth Roger Eugene
Original AssigneeEtude Pour L Acide Carbonique
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for the saturation of liquids by gas
US 2172035 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 5, 1939.

R. 5;. Row

APPARATUS FOR THE SATURATION OF-LIQUIDS BY GAS Filed March 11, 1937' INVENTOR RQTH ENE

g ROQER E06 T RNEY-s Patented Sept. 5, 1939 UNITED STATES,

PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS Foa ,THE summon or mourns BY GAS Roger Eugene Roth, Olichy,'France, assignor to. Socit dEtude pour lAcide Oarbonique, Clichy',

Seine, France Application March 11, 1937, Serial No. 130,398

' In France May 22. 1936 7' Claims. ease- 22 The object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus for the saturation, by suitable gases, of liquid contained in common receptacles.

With this apparatus, the gas is freed inside the liquid in the form of infinitely small particles, ata suitably calculated rate and pressure forobtaining a good saturation. Moreover, the liberation of the gas taking place in the form of jets directed in diflerent directions, causes" the mixture to be vigorously agitated thus assuring a still better saturation of the liquid.

Since the pressure necessary inside the receptacle must be uniform and constant, a device .-embodying a valve, which will be dealt with later,

is removed a For simplifying the following description, and

by way of example only. the gas mentioned hereinafter is carbonic acid, the liquid water and the receptacle an ordinary glass bottle. i

It is obvious that according to the requirement, any other gas may be used and the water can be replaced by wine, flavoured or alcoholic drinks, coffee, milk, or even medical solutions, etc.

In the appended drawing, Fig. 1 illustrates the apparatus in section and Fig. 2. shows a perspective view of an alternative of the head of the apparatus with its different parts set apart.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of the discharge valve.

Fig. 4 is anenlarged fragmentary sectional A dip tube 1 integral with the head a has the terminal piece g at its bottom end. This tube 50 is also intended to serve as a gas reserve as will be seen further in the operation of the apparatus.

The terminal piece a is made of suitable material and is porous at certain points only. Preferably the porous zones are situated at the hot- 55 tom of said piece and in such a manner as to in vigorouslyso as to compress the washer a.

for this purpose, as well as any other tight packimpart a directional effect to the discharging gas. 1

From these zones CO2 will issue as a fine spray in the form of mixing jets.

The piercing or percussion device for the cap 5 sule h containing the liquid carbonic acid is housed in head a. I I It embodies a percussion tube i, awasher j of elastic material and a spring 10;

Tube i is pierced by holes forthe' passage of 10 the gas.

The capsule his pierced by screwing it in its housing, its valve engaging the perc n tube 1'.

The washer i pressed both by-the end of the.

cartridge and the spring It ensures a perfect tightness, and also acts as packing in the housing 1. Any other percussion system may be used. The carbonic acid set free passes to the tube 1 through passage m.

' The head 0 also containsa passage 1!. closed by 20 a valve 0 made of elastic material, thisvalve being held on its seat by a spring 1: housed inside the spout q. When the pressure inside the bottle exceeds a certain given limit, the valve rises from its seat, part of the 002- escapes into the 5 open air and the spring again forces the valve on to its seat.

Valve 0 and its stem are provided with 'peripheral grooves or their diameters are such that the gas .can escape into the open air when the valve 30 is open. The finger lever 1' serves to control the valve from outside.

The operation of the device-is easily understood. $5

The bottle being filled with water, the collar 1) fixed on its neck, head a is thoroughly screwed Then capsule h is punctured by screwing it into its threaded housing. The carbonic acid can only discharge a through the piece a, in the form of fine jets which saturate the liquid contained in the bottle.

Valve 0 then automatically frees thequantity of carbonic acid undissolved in the liquid. Thus, the pressure inside the bottle cannot reach a dangerous limit.

.when the cartridge n is empty the water is perfectly saturated.

The pressure liquid can be poured out, as with,

an ordinary siphon, by means of the spout q provided the bottle is sufliciently tilted and valve 0 is opened by pressing finger lever r. The gas agave in tube 1 permits the emptying of the Alternatively the head a may be unscrewed,

poured from the bottle, in the case where it is desired to have the water highly saturated. This last-method is specially recommended for making lemonade. When using the device as a siphon a large part of the carbonic acid escapes from the liquid.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for thesaturation of liquid by gas, comprising a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid, a stopper, a tube prolonging the stop per, dipping into the receptacle and closed at its free end by a hollow body permeable to gases under pressure; means for fixing the stopper on the receptacle, a passage in the stopper forfeedin a gas under pressure into the tube, a second passage in the stopper connecting the inside of the receptacle above the maximum liquid levelvided with a sealing flange, an externally-threaded stopper fitted into the neck of said receptacle, an internally-threaded collar for receiving the externally-threaded stopper, a second collar resiliently gripping the neck of the receptaclg beneath said flange, connecting lugs between the two collars, and a sealing ring between the stop.-

per and the. neck of the receptacle.

3. Apparatus for the saturation of liquids by gas, comprising: a receptacle, a stopper, a tube prolonging the stopper, dipping into the receptacle and closed at its free end by a hollow body. permeable to gases under pressure, means for fixing the stopper on the receptacle, a capsule for the pressure gas having a threaded flange, a mortise threaded into the stopper receiving the flange of the capsule, a piercing tube for the capsule placed in the mortise, a passage in the stopper joining the mortise to the tube, a sec ond passage in the stopper connecting the inside of the receptacle with the exterior.

4. Apparatus for the saturation of liquids by the device bodily removed and the liquid directly Der Joining the mortise to the tube, a second passage in the stopper connecting the "inside of receptacle with the exterior, a chamber covering the exterior of said second passage, and a loaded valve in said chamber.

5. Apparatus for --the saturation of liquids by gas, comprising: a receptacle, a stopper, a tube prolonging the stopper dipping into the receptacle and closed at its free end by a hollow body permeable to gases under pressure, means for 'fixing the stopperon the receptacle, a capsule for the pressure .gas having a threaded flange, a mortise threaded into the stopper receiving the flange of the capsule, a piercing tube for the capsule placed in the mortise, a .passage in the stopper joining. the mortise to the tube, a second passage in the stopper connecting the inside oi.

receptacle with the exterior, a chamber covering 6. Apparatus for'the saturation of liquids by gas, comprising: a receptacle, a stopper, a tube prolonging the stopper dipping into the receptatile and closed at its free end by a hollow body permeable to gases under pressure, means for fixing the stopper on the receptacle, a capsule for the pressure, gas..having a threaded flange,

a mortise threaded into the stopper receiving gas, comprising: a receptacle adapted to contain a liquid, a stopper, 9. tubeprolonging the stopper, dipping into the receptacle and closed at its free'end by a hollow body permeable to gases under pressure, means for fixing the stopper on the receptacle, a passage in the stopper for feeding a gas under pressure into the tube, a second passage in the stopper connecting the inside of the receptacle above the maximum liquid level with the exterior to enable liquid to enter said latter passage at the upper portion of the receptacle and be poured therefrom, and a loaded releasable valve closing sage.

ROGER EUGENE ROTH.

said last-mentioned pas-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600901 *Mar 7, 1950Jun 17, 1952Meldau Fred JohnBeverage carbonating device
US2682977 *Apr 7, 1949Jul 6, 1954Nat Dairy Res Lab IncWhipped cream dispenser
US4735348 *Jan 16, 1986Apr 5, 1988Norcarl Products, Inc.Apparatus for making a carbonated beverage
US5635232 *Nov 23, 1994Jun 3, 1997Perlage Systems, Inc.Shatterproof bottle-shaped storage container that securely encloses a glass bottle containing a beverage allows high pressure co2 gas to be dissolved in the beverage while remaining in original bottle
US7926791 *Jan 18, 2007Apr 19, 2011Bertoli Charles JOxygen supply humidification system
US8177196 *Apr 18, 2011May 15, 2012Bertoli Charles JOxygen supply humidification system
WO1999052622A1 *Apr 10, 1999Oct 21, 1999Brita GmbhDevice for introducing gas into a liquid
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/17, D07/300.1, 261/DIG.700, D23/232, 261/122.1, 222/399
International ClassificationB67D1/04
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0412, B01F3/04801, Y10S261/07
European ClassificationB01F3/04C8D2, B67D1/04B