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Publication numberUS2172053 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1939
Filing dateNov 8, 1938
Priority dateOct 24, 1938
Publication numberUS 2172053 A, US 2172053A, US-A-2172053, US2172053 A, US2172053A
InventorsCarl B Robbins
Original AssigneeCalaveras Cement Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building block
US 2172053 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 5, 1939. c. B. RoBBlNs BUILDING BLOCK Filed Nov. 8, 1958 A TTORNEY Patented Sept. 5, 1939 PATENT ori-ICE 2.172,05?,l BUILDING BLOCK CarlfB. Robbins, Stanford University, Calif., assignor to Calaveras Cement Company, a corporation of California Application November 8, 1938, Serial No. 239,516

Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in concrete building blocks.

The conventional concrete building blocks now commonly used in the fabrication of' wall struc- 5 tures are designed. primarily to provide left-inplace forms adaptedv to hold vertical columns. of

thermal insulating material. Wall structures made with concrete building blocks of this particular type have several disadvantages, the most objectionable of which is that their construction or design doesnot provide for adequate internal reenforcing. It is well known that a mass of concrete cast as a, unitary structure is considerably stronger thanv an equal mass made up of a number of pre-cast units, and since it is not possible with theY concrete' building blocks now commonly usedY to construct a wallhaving a unitary and integrally formedv concrete structure throughout, the load-bearing properties of such a wall are not adequate to meet certain building requirements.

Overcoming, these disadvantages, I have provided an improved building block of novel shape and construction having internal spaces for hold- 25" ing thermal insulating material as well as concrete and steel' reenforeements.

Another object of my invention is to provide an improved rectangular-shaped building block having an opentop and= an open bottom and provided internally with cells or spaces for holding a section, of thermal insulating material.

Another' object of my invention is to provide an improved building block having a construction, which in associationA with other similar blocks forming a wall structure, provides reenforcing means adapted to' both` reenforce the Wall and at the same time seal the horizontal and Vertical vjoints ordinarily located between the blocks.

40 Other and further objects of my invention will be pointed out hereinafter, indicated in the appended claims, or will be obvious to one skilled in the art upon an understanding of thepresentdisclosure. For the purpose of this application I have elected to show herein certain -forms and details of building blocks and wall vstructures representative of my invention; it is to be understood, however, that the embodiments of my invention herein shown and described are for purposes of illustration only, and that therefore they are not to be regarded as exhaustive of the variations of the invention, nor are they to be given interpretations such as might have the effect of limiting the claims,` short of the true and most comprehensive.. scope of the invention in the art.

In the accompanying` drawing:

Fig. lis a. Perspective view. of a building block embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a Vperspective view of a partly fabri- 5 cated wallv made from a number of blocks illustrated in Fig. 1.;

Fig.y 3 is a side elevation of a wall constructed in accordance with my invention, showing a porion thereof broken away and in vertical sec- 10 ion;

Fig. 4 is a sectional View. taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is asectional view taken onthe line 5-5 of Fig. 4. 15

Referring particularly to- Figs. l to 5 inclusive, the. numerall designates a concrete building block of general, rectangular shape, open at its top and.bottom,rand having its two longest sides 2 and 3- separatedl one from another by a lon- 20 'gitudinally disposed, parallel partition 4. The partition divides theinterior of the block into two cells' or spaces 5 Vand 6 which are approximately of thel same width, but not necessarily so. The' opposite ends of the cell 5 are enclosed 25 by end members 1 and 8 while the opposite ends of the cell 6 are enclosed by end members 9 and Ill. The end members1 l, 8, 9 and Illy are preferably disposed in parallel relation to one another. The combined lengths of the end spaces 30" Il and l2Y and the cell lv are substantially the same as that of the cell 5. When` two of the blocks are positioned end to end there is provided behind the contiguous portions of the ends l and 8 an enclosed space (made'up of the end space 35v ll of one block and the end space l2 of the other), which is adapted to contain a body of concretev that seals the vertical joint between theV two blocks. So as to provide for the integral horizontal connection of the bodies of cement 40 normally located in the end4 Spaces ll and I2 with the body of cement filling the cell 6, the end members 9 and I0 are each, at their top and bottom edges, curved inwardly toward each other as at 9 and l0 respectively. y

Infabriating a wall structure in accordance withv my invention,V the blocks are arranged in overlapping `formation one 'above the 'other with the extreme ends of one block positioned midway between the ends of a block located directly 50 beneath it, as illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. The dimensions of the cells 6 of the blocks being such that their widths are considerably less than their lengths, enables certain of the steel rods I3a to assume diagonal or slanting positions, thereby 55 providing a reenforcing structure which possesses improved load-carrying' properties. To further provide a thoroughly reenforced structure, Steel rods I3 are positioned in horizontal positions resting upon the curved end members 9. and I0, as shown in Fig. 2. After the rods I3 and I 3a are placed as aforesaid, the interconnected cells and spaces 6, II, and I2 throughout the height, length and breadth of the wall are filled with concrete 0r other suitablereenforcing material. When the concrete has hardened in the usual manner, a unitary and integrally connected concrete structure by horizontal steel rods I3 and by vertical and diagonal steel rods I3a is provided throughout the length, breadth and height of the wall. The-- interconnected spaces or cells 5 of the blocks are next filled with a suitable thermal insulating material I5.

Since the concrete structure I 4 is connected inV every direction throughout the length, breadth and height of the wall, thereby adequately reenforcing the latter, the sides, ends and partition of the blocks may be of considerably less thickness than is the case with concrete building blocks of the kind now commonly used. After thefwall has been completed the vertical Vas well as the horizontal joints between the blocks'are eectively sealed by the body` of concrete material I4 which fills the connected spaces II and I2 and the cells 6.

VThe building blocks constituting the present invention may be made from either concrete or other suitable material.V 1

Having described my invention, what I claim 1. A substantially rectangular building block, open at its top and bottom and having a longitudinal partition disposed'in parallel relation to the longest sides of the block, the said partition dividing the interior of the block into two longitudinal cells, each of said cells being enclosed by end members, and the 'end members of one of the cells each being disposed inwardly at its upper and lower edges to permit a quantity of plastic material located in the said last mentioned cell to extend over its said end members and become integrally connected to a partY of said plastic material located in areas adjacent the ends of said last mentioned cell.

2. A substantially rectangular building block, open at its top and bottom and having a longitudinal partition disposed in parallel relation to the longest sides of the block, the said partition dividing the interior of the block into two longitudinal cells, the said cells each being enclosed by end members, and the end members of one cell each being cut away at at least one of its free edges, wherebyY a space is provided atrpoints where the said end members are cut away for the positioning of a connecting portion of a body of plastic material located in the last mentioned cell and in areas adjoining theends of the latter.

3. A substantially rectangular buildingfblock, open at its top and bottom and having la longitudinal partition disposed lin parallelV relation to the longest sides ofthe block, the said partition dividing theinterior of the block intotwo longi- I4 reenforced Y tudinal cells, the said block having its opposite ends so deformed as to make one cell shorter than the other cell, the end walls of the shorter of the two cells being disposed inwardly from' the end walls of the other cell, and the end walls of the shorter cell being cut away at at least one of its free edges to provide a space for the positioning of a connecting portion of a body of plastic'material normally located in the shorter of the two cells and in areas adjoining the ends of the latter.

A substantially rectangular building block openV at its top and bottom and having a longitudinal partition disposed in parallel relation to the longest sides of the block, the said partition dividing the interior of the block into two longitudinal cells, the said block having its opposite ends disposed so that the ends of one cell are positioned inwardly from the ends of the other cell,

whereby cells of dilerent lengths are provided, and whereby end spaces are provided adjacent the opposite ends of the shorter of the two cells, the opposite ends of the shorter cell being each cut away at its top and bottom edges to provide spaces for the positioning of a connecting portion of a body of plastic material normally located in the said shorter cell and in the spaces adjoining the latters ends.

f 5. In a masonry wall structure, a plurality of` substantially rectangular buli-ding blocks, each open at its top and bottom and each being divided interiorly into two longitudinally disposed cells by a longitudinal partition disposed in substantially parallel relation to the long sides of the block, the said blocks being arranged in horizontal rows with one adjacent row superimposed upon another row and the blocks of adjacent rows arranged in overlapping positions so that the opposite ends of one block are centrally positioned with respect to the two adjacent blocks supporting it, the said blocks of each row being arranged with a portion of their ends contiguous to one another, and each of the blocks having their contiguous ends of such an inwardly disposedirregular shape that the ends of one cell are poistioned inwardly from the ends of the other cell, whereby cells of different lengths are provided, and whereby end spaces are provided adjacent the opposite ends of the shorter of the two cells, the opposite ends of the shorter cell beingV each cut away at at least its top or bottom edge to provide a space for the positioning of a connecting portion of avbody of concrete material normallyrlocated in the said shorter cell and in the end spaces adjacent the latters ends, the said end spaces of adjacent blocks being so disposed that when lled with said body of concrete material the vertical joints of the contiguous blocks are sealed, the said blocks when so arranged in horizontal superimposed rows providing two vertical material-holding forms each comprising a series of interconnected cells, the saidbody of concrete material being located in the particular form having the said end spaces and the shorter cells, and a body of insulating material located in the other form.`

CARL B. ROBBINS

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3221457 *Jun 25, 1962Dec 7, 1965Ernest VevodaMonolithic wall slab and method of constructing same
US4748782 *Jun 16, 1987Jun 7, 1988Johnson Stanley DSelf-aligned and leveled insulated, drystack block structures and means and methods therefor
US5072556 *Dec 20, 1989Dec 17, 1991Egenhoefer George GWall assembly construction
US5735090 *Aug 8, 1995Apr 7, 1998Papke; WilliamModular foundation construction and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/405.3, 52/607, 52/438
International ClassificationE04B2/42, E04B1/76, E04B2/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/42, E04B1/76, E04B2002/0295
European ClassificationE04B2/42, E04B1/76