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Publication numberUS2172259 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1939
Filing dateMar 3, 1937
Priority dateMar 3, 1937
Publication numberUS 2172259 A, US 2172259A, US-A-2172259, US2172259 A, US2172259A
InventorsPosnack Emanuel R
Original AssigneePosnack Emanuel R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stapling method and device
US 2172259 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SPt 5, 1939- E. R. PosNAcK 2,172,259

STAPLING METHOD AND DEVICE Filed March 3, 1937 Patented Sept. 5, 1939 UNITED STAT-Eos .PATENT ori-ice 2,172,259 srsrnmd METHOD AND nEvrcE Emanuel B.. Posnack, Broohlyn, N. Y. y Application March $1937, Serial No. 128,832

9 Claims.

. This invention relates to stapling methods and 'devices Ifor effecting permanent or temporary closures for containers made of corrugated board and the like, for top and bottom sealing of cartons, for securing together several sheets of paper or other material, and for tacking or similar purposes.

q Y In the several conventional methods of stapling, the most commonly employed staple is that hav- 10 ing two prongs` or legs, either straight or substantially arcuate, driven into the work by a plunger travelling normal to the plane of the work. Another form of staple, only occasionally employed,

is the single-legged or at Wire type the top and bottom' of whichl are clenched by positive deecting means, such as by a top and bottom anvil -this type of staplealso being driven by aplunger moving perpendicular to the surface ofniechanisins-a mi the staples themselves are gen-a erally quite expensive due' to the length of the stock and-the forming operationsrequired to produce them. It is one of the objects of this invention to overcome'these shortcomings by simthereofan 'objective which I attain by employing .in certain forms'- bi-tiiis invention en inclineddrive preferably although not exclusively' with single-legged. staples having the penetratingv prongsthereof also inclined with respect to the surface of the work. By means of such a method,

a relatively simple and inexpensive staple can readily be driven into the work whereby the materlal being stapled will be held betweenthe head and leg of the' staple to resist 'a vertical upward Dull inated or retracted, thereby bviating'the necessity of employing special die or anvils for forming so the top head of the staple.

Andit is`a1s0 an object-0f. this invention t0Y .employ the principlesabove mentioned and the methods based thereon either inconnection witha fiatwire or single-legged type of staple or one Il having two legs with azconnecting cross-bar.

plifying stapling operations and reducing the cost' i stapling machine employing an inclined driver It is also within the contemplation of this invention to enable a straight single-legged staple.

40 to be driven into the work simultane usly with the formation of ahead thereon where y the de- Another object of this invention is to provide a staple whereby a secure operative grip will be effected by employing the method above referred toe and whereby a plurality of staples adapted to be driven thereby can be economically housed in 5 -the structure thereof.

- thereof with a: relatively rigid memberA positioned above the work, preferably aided by the resistance afforded by the material being stapled. 4l5

Another object of this invention is' to employ the method above referred to for effecting a stapling operation with the use of an underlying anvil whereby. it` can be employed particularly for bottom stapling of cartons and for the sta- 20 pling together of several sheets of paper.

Other objects, features and advantages will appear from the drawing and the description hereinafter given.

In-the drawing: as

Figure 1 is a fragmentary vertical section of a and a single-legged stapl'ewith an inclined penetrating prong, illustrating the principle o'f one of the features4 of my invention. so

Figure 2is a vertical sectional view showing the '1 relative position of the parts of Figure 1 uponthe completion of .the driving stroke.

Figure 3 isa fragmentary vertical section of a stapling machine employing two inclined 35 drivers, `the drive' of one being advanced with respect to that of the other. vFigure 4 represents the parts of Figure 3 after .the completion of the driving stroke.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary` verticalsection of a 40 device substantially similar to that shown in Flgure 3, 'the drivers being adapted for simultaneous operation.

Figure 6 represents two staples, one long an'd one short, driven into the work by a device similar tothat'ofFigureS. Figure rI is a plan'y view of two staples driven by a device similar to that of Figure 3, .the heads'ofthe staples beingshown in 'crossing relation to each other. s Y

Figure 8 represents a modified form of staple driven into the work by a device similar to that of Figure l, the staple containing an additional verticallydisposed short leg. A

Figure 9 is `a fragmentary vertical secti n bt a 5 5 a staple having a leg forming an obtuse angle.

with the head thereof.

Figure 10 represents two staples driven by a device similar to that of Figure 3, one of the staples being that shown in Figure 8.

vFigure 11 represents two staples, one of the form shown in Figure 8, driven by a device similar to that of Figure 3 with the heads thereof in crossing relation.

Figure 12 is a modified form of staple driven by the method and device of my invention, the staple being provided with along and short leg substantially parallel to each other.

Figure 13 is still another form of staple, shown driven into the work by the device and method of my invention.

Figure 14 is a fragmentary vertical section of another form of stapling machine embodying my invention, including an underlying anvil, the parts being shown -during the operative drive of the plunger.

Figure 15 is a view similar to Figure 14 showing the staple in its fully clenched position.

In the operation of a preferred form. of my invention, an inclined staple is driven downwardly4 into the work by an inclined plunger whereby, upon the completion of the stroke, the head portion of the staple will lengage the surface of the Work and the penetrating portion thereof will be inclined at an angle thereto. Hence in this position the head and penetrating portions of the` staple will hold therebetween-a portion of the material being stapled, thereby resulting in a resistance to a straight upward vertical pull of the staple.

Thus in Figures 1 and 2, which illustrate the principle of one of the features of this invention, the stapel), positioned against and supported by the inclined guide 3l, is driven downwardly by the inclined plunger 32. Inasmuch as the leg 33 of the staple is inclined with respect to the surface of the work 34, and the head 35 of the staple is substantially parallel to said surface, a downward drive of the plunger will cause said head to engage the surface of the work, and upon continued pressure, to be actually countersunk therein as shown in Figure 2. The leg 33 enters at an inclination, substantially in the direction shown in Figure 2, assuming that the resistance afforded by the material is not sumciently great to cause an additional bending of said leg. Hence it is apparentY that the portion 36 of the material being stapled is partially gripped between the `head and leg of the staple, thereby presenting a to indicate the direction in which the leg extends.

In attempting to remove the staple, the normal tendency would obviously be to pull vertically upwardly. This would be resisted by all the material directly above the inclined leg 33 of the staple. In addition to this resistance, there is of course the usual frictional resistance of the material against the leg of the staple, thereby necessitating more than an average pull to dislodge the staple, unless it is pulled outwardly in the direction of the leg thereof.

Although a single staple of the type shown in Figures 1 and 2 may be suincient in many cases especiallylfor tacking and tagging purposes, a

' 56 downwardly along converging paths, into the outlet or open portion 44 in the base of the machine. It is obvious that the plungers 55 and 56 can be operatively actuated by any conventional means whereby they can be made to follow the convergent paths of said channels. Under the influence of said plungers, the staples will become embedded in the work, the terminals ofv the inclined legs of the two oppositely positioned staples being brought into proximate relation to each other.

It will be seen from an examination particularly of Figures 3, 4 and 6 that the heads of the staples are substantially in one vertical plane, as is most obvious from an inspection of Figures 4 and 6 which illustrate the heads ofthe staples as being in engaging relationship at the termination of the drive. And it is of course obvious that the ultimate relative positions of the heads of cooperating staples will be dependent upon the angles and relative positioning of said channels. In the particular form of my invention illustrated in Figures 3 and 4 the opening 44 is shown suiiiciently wide to accommodate both heads in overlapping relation as well as the terminal portions of the plungers 55 and 56. In the form shown, the plunger 56 is relatively narrow and adapted only to engage that portion of the underlying staple 58 adjacent the junction of the head and leg thereof, whereas the plunger 55 is considerably wider andis in engagement with substantially the entire head portion of the underlying staple 51.

It is of course understood that the relative dimensions of the plungers are merely illustrative and that other dimensional proportions may be employed within the spirit and scope of this invention.

In the lform of my invention illustrated in Figure 3 it is preferred that the plunger 56 be actuated slightly before 55, so as to enable the staple 58 to be completely embedded within the work before staple 51, thereby enabling the overlapping relationship of the heads to be effectuated. Asis clearly illustrated in the drawing, the

, opening v44 is suiliciently wide to accommodate not only the overlapped heads of the staples, but also the lower extremities of the plungers 55 and 56, thereby rendering it readily feasible for the combined drive to be eilectuated. In the form illustrated a considerable portion of the drive of v, v

both plungers takes place simultaneously. The

said plungers 55 and 56 can be actuated in any l conventional manner, as it is primarily within the contemplation of this invention to provide such means and such steps whereby two of the above-described type of staples can be operatively driven by any selected or conventional actuating 4 a straight vertical upward pull will be resisted can also be in crossing relation, as is shown in i Figure 7,'where the underlying staple 59 is held against withdrawal by the overlying staple 60.'

In Figure 5 the relative positions of the plungers 31 and 3l are'such as to bring the heads 52 and 53 of the staples 41 and 48 into proximate relationship, as distinguished from the overlapping arrangement above described. In this form of my invention, the drive of both staples can be completed simultaneously.

. By using the method employed by the structures of Figures 3 and 4, but with the'flrst driven staple shorter than the other, a result such as'Iis shown in Figure 6 can be obtained. Here the two staples are preferably driven in the same plane, the head of the rst driven staple 6I underlying that of the second drive staple 62, the terminal point 63 of the ilst driven staple being positioned above the leg of staple 52. In this structureit is of that direction; and there may be a further -in- Award' bending thereof as a result of the resistance ofthe material 1l upon the completion of the drive by any of the structures above described.

With any of the forms of staples shown in Figures 8 to 13 inclusive, where a short leg depends from the head of the staple on the side thereof opposite the long leg, a very secure clenching effect will be obtained. With any of these staples,

a straight vertical upward pullwill be resisted by jacent the short leg. Thus, by referring to Fig-v ure 8, a p'ull in the direction of the arrow will be resisted by the portion 19 of the material being stapled, inasmuch as theshort leg 69 would have to lplow through said portion 19 in-order to enable the staple to be removed; and a straight vertical course obvious that the plungers 64 and 65 are operatively'actuated similar to the plungell's 55 and 56 of Figures 3 and 4. When the staples are embedded in position as shown in Figure 6, a straight upward pull of staple 62 will be resisted not only'by the material above the leg thereof,

but also by the leg 6I which is in the' path thereof; and the staple 6| could obviously not be withdrawn because the head thereof is overlapped by the head of staple 62. With this arrangement, not only are two staples driven into the work to coact with each other in a minimum are so arranged as to make it extremely diilicultlto remove them without plowing through the material of the work.

It is preferred that the two oppositely posio tioned staples such-ae 51 and 5B be in the same vertical plane, inasmuch as it is highly probable that the ultimate positions of the legs of the staples would be as shown in Figure 4. In actual practice, even though the legs of the two staples are in substantially the same plane, one ,will normally slip by the other to complete the clench m crossing Irelationship.A s

' By employing the inclined drives -shown in any of the. foregoing structures, modified forms of staples can also be driven to produceV greater holding effects. For example, the staple 56 of Figure 8 contains ya downwardly extending short leg 61, so that the holding 'power ofthe staple will be increased considerably thereby. When (se Figure 10), may also contain such a short downwardly extending leg, and the head of staple 69 may be substantially flat. When the staples pull will be resisted by the material above. the' long leg. Hence regardless of the direction of the pull, the staple will be rmly held in place.

In connection with the aforementioned staples containing short legs, it should be noted that they can be readily driven by any of the inclined drives above described. The major portion of the d rive is employed to direct the long leg into the material substantially in the direction of the inclination of this leg; and the short leg will beend of the plunger stroke.

' plowing through to any appreciable extent, parspace to eifect a secure stapling grip, but they.

ticularly in view of the fact that both the staple and the material being stapled are intended for this purpose to be slightly resilient and sufllciently tough. l

vEmploying the principle of an inclined drive,

an sunderlying anvil 15 can be employed where that may be necessary, such as for bottom stapling of containers, or for the securing together of several sheets of paper. By referring to Figures 14 and 15, it will be seen that'the inclined plunger 16 engages the staple. 11 to direct it through the work-against-the said anvil 15, the position of the two plungers are employed, one of the legs 88.

7are driven in crossing relation to each other, the

m. result will be similar to that shown in Figure 11,

where` the staple 10 contains a short downwardly extending leg and the underlying staple is preferably substantially flat headed. v

It is within the -contemplation ogthis invention 55` to employ a leg forming either an acute or an obtuse angle with the head thereof; the staple tom, 'thereby clamping the material therebe- 1 tween.

In this form of stapling device, a relativelyl inexpensive staple can hencebe employed to perform the stapling operations generallyfperformed by conventional oillce stapling machines or bot- Y It is of course understood that other additional forms and `modifications of the apparatus and adaptations of the-method constituting this inventioncan be employed beyond and in addition to lthose hereinbefore described, all scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

within trie 1. In a stapling machine for driving two oppositely positioned staples each a head portion substantially parallelto the surface-of the work4 being stapled and a leg at an linclination 4thereto, two plungers converging towards the base -of the machine and each engageable with one of said staples, the inclination ofthe plunger;

being substantially that of the'legs of the corresponding staples, an opening in the base of the machine suiliciently -wide to accommodate the head portions of said two oppositely positioned staples when in overlapping engagement and the lower portions of the two plungers at the end of their strokes, and guiding means for directing said plungers and the staples driven thereby to said opening whereby the said head portions are in overlapping engagement.

2. In a method of driving staples each having a head and a leg forming an acute angle therewith, the steps of positioning two oppositely disposed staples with their legs in converging relation and their heads in substantially one vertical l plane, applying driving pressure upon the heads of said oppositely disposed staples in the direction of the work being stapled, and directing said staples in such converging paths toward the work' as to cause the heads of the two driven staples to overlap and the legs thereof to penetrate said work in crossing relation to each other.

3. In a method of driving staples each having a head and a leg forming an acute angle therewith, the steps of positioning two oppositely disposed staples with their legs in converging relation and the head of one closer to the work being stapled than the other, the heads of the ^two staples being substantially in one vertical plane, applying driving pressure first upon the head of the lower staple and then upon the other staple in the direction of the work, .and directing said staples towards the work at such inclination as to cause the legs of the two staples to penetrate the work and the heads thereof to be in overlapping engagement.

4. In a method of stapling, the steps of selecting two staples each having a head and a leg forming an acute angle therewith, the leg of one of the staples being shorter than the other, positioning the two staples with their legs converging towards the work being stapled, applying driving pressure first upon the head of the shorter-legged staple and then upon that of the other staple in the direction of the work, and directing said staples towards the work at such an inclination as to cause the legs of the two staples to penetrate the work and the heads thereof to be-n overlapping engagement.

5. In a method of'stapling, the steps of selecting two staples each having a head and a leg forming an acute angle therewith, the leg of one of the staples being shorter than the other, po-

sitioning the two staples in substantially the samel plane with their legs converging towards the work being stapled, applying driving pressure first upon the head of the shorter-legged staple and then upon that of the other staple in the direction of the work, and directing said staples towards the work at such an inclination as to cause the legs of the two staples to penetrate the work and the heads thereof to be in overlapping engagemenhand whereby the driven legs will be in substantially the same plane.

6. AIn a stapling machine for driving two oppositely positioned staples each having a head portion substantially parallel to the surface of the work being stapled and a leg at an inclination thereto, two channels converging towards the base of the machine and each inclined thereto at an angle substantially equal to that between the leg of each staple and its head, said channels being adapted to slidably accommodate two oppositely disposed staples with the heads thereof in substantially one vertical plane, two plungers slidably movable within said channels and each operatively engageable with the staple therein, said channels extending through the base of the machine and thereby providing an open part for operatively accommodating the head portions of the staples.

7. In a stapling machine for driving two oppositely positioned staples each having a head portion substantially parallel'to the surface of the work being stapled and a leg at an inclination thereto, two channels converging towards the base of the machine and each inclined thereto at an angle substantially equal to that between the leg of each staple and its head, said channels being adapted to slidably accommodate two oppositely disposed staples with the heads there of in substantially one vertical plane. two plungers slidably movable within said channels and each operatively engageable with the staple therein, one of said plungers being engageable with.

substantially the entire head of the underlying staple and the other plungerv being engageable with that portion of the head of its' underlying staple adjacent its juncture with the leg of the staple.

8. In a method of driving staples, the steps of selecting a staple of resilient wire comprising a substantially fiat head portion with a long and a short leg at opposite sides thereof, the long leg being inclined to the head portion and the short leg being in non-parallel relation to the long leg, positioning the staple with said head portion substantially parallel to the plane of the work being stapled and said legs extending towards the work, applying driving pressure upon said head portion of the staple, and directing the staple towards'theY work in a path substantially in the direction of the said inclination of the long leg to force said legs into the work, whereby the short leg will encounter greater resistance to penetration than the long leg resulting 9. In a method of driving a staple of resilient wire with a substantially at head portion and non-parallel long and short legs at opposite sides thereof, the long legbeing inclined to the head portion at an acute angle, and the short leg forming an angle with the head portion no greater `than the steps of positioning the staple with said head portion substantially parallel to the plane of the work being stapled and said legs extending towards the work, applying driving pressure upon saidV head portion of the staple, and directing the staple' towards the work in a path substantially in the direction of the said inclination of the long leg to force said legs into the worlnwhereby the short legwill encounter greater resistance to penetration than the long leg resulting in a yieldable deection'thereofwithin the worktowards the long leg. v

EMANUEL R. POSNACK.

Vin a yieldable deflection thereof within the work'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2543626 *Apr 5, 1949Feb 27, 1951Gen ElectricMethod of attaching a panel to a surface
US4265160 *Feb 27, 1978May 5, 1981Martinez Renato GComposite staple-type fastener having relatively movable locking portions
US4598852 *Aug 29, 1984Jul 8, 1986Swingline Inc.Fastener driving tool including fastener deformation and guidance arrangements
WO1982000429A1 *Aug 7, 1980Feb 18, 1982Olesen PA fastener driving tool for corners
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/432.1, 227/148, 411/470
International ClassificationB27F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27F7/00
European ClassificationB27F7/00