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Publication numberUS2172669 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1939
Filing dateJun 6, 1936
Publication numberUS 2172669 A, US 2172669A, US-A-2172669, US2172669 A, US2172669A
InventorsRichard B. Taft
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski harness
US 2172669 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. B TAl -T SKI HARNES 5 Sept. 12, 1939.

Filed June 6, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 pig. 1

Sept. 12, 1939. R B TAFT I 2,172,669

SKI HARNESS Filed June 6, 1936 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 war-"=- Fig. 5 2

gvwc wtoo I Richard BTaft Patented Sept. 12, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 19 Claims.

My invention relates to ski harnesses or bindings. The present invention in principleissimilar to that disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 64,644, filed February 19, 1936. Specifically the present invention is an improvement over that disclosed in my aforesaid application.

Skis are employed in a variety of sports-in jumping, in cross country races, in downhill races, and in slalom races. They must, of course, be adaptable to climbing, for in order to come down one must go up. Characteristics which fit a given binding for one style of use usually make it less well adapted to another style of use, and unless a binding is to be specialized for one kind of sport, it must necessarily be a compromise, and that binding is the best which best meets in reasonable measure most of the requirements for the different types of the sport.

In jumping it is essential that the heel be at all times pressed firmly to the ski, for if the ski may depart from the heel the point is likely to throw upward and rearward from the force of the relative air, and perhaps to strike the jumper in the face, and moreover, the skis must be under perfect control for landing from a jump, and can only be under such perfect control if the heel remains at all times tightly in contact with the ski. In climbing, however, and in cross country touring considerable flexibility is desirable, so that the heel of the boot may depart readily from the ski. However, in touring there is a succession of climbing and downhill runs, and at times jumping may be required. In downhill work it is desirable that the heel be not permitted to depart from the ski, or at most but slightly. It follows, then, that one of the essentials of a good ski binding, for all except climbing or cross country work, is that the heel be held at all times firmly to the ski. If in addition the harness possesses the capability of permitting the heel to be raised somewhat from the ski by the application of force in manner suitable to accomplish this, it then fulfills in reasonable measure the requirements for touring and for climbing.

Skiing technique follows several different trends. The Arlberg technique is Widely used, but the telemark technique is becomingly increasingly popular, despite the restrictions of presently available bindings to the employment of this latter technique. In telemark skiing the skis are held close together, one foot ahead of the other, with the weight chiefly on the forward foot. This requires the heel of the rear foot to be raised from the ski, or an undue strain is placed upon the muscles. ideally suited to telemark.

There is, however, a further consideration to be kept in mind, namely, that all skiers occasionally fall, and less experienced skiers will frequently 5 fall, and a forward fall, unless the heel may raise from the ski, is liable to produce a severe injury to the ankle, foot, or leg. To guard against this danger the heel of the ski boot should, under such extraordinary conditions and forces, depart l0 materially from the surface of the ski so that the wearer may fall prone, if need be, on the surface whereon the skis are running, without placing too much strain on the ankle.

Other considerations are case of engagement 15 and disengagement of the toe of the boot with the harness and of the heel-engaging portion of the harness with the heel of the boot; the clearing of snow which may gather, so that it will not interfere with the operation of the harness nor 20 pack under the foot; ease of attachment of the harness to the ski, and ready adaptability of the harness to different sizes of boot.

It is the object of the present invention to provide a harness which in the fullest measure pos- 5 sible meets the various requirements and accomplishes the ends indicated above as desirable.

It is an object to provide a harness which will fit a ski boot which has not a stiffening plate of metal built into it.

It is another object to provide a harness having the advantages and capabilities indicated, which shall be simple in construction and comparatively inexpensive to make, and which need raise the boot but little, if any, above the upper 35 surface of the ski.

It is a further object to provide such a harness which will give to the toes sensitive and reliable control of the ski in all positions of the foot relative to the ski or of the ski relative to the snow 40 surface, and which will therefore insure the proper alignment of the foot with the ski.

Other objects, and particuarly such as relate more purely to mechanical details, will be better understood as this specification progresses. 45

My invention comprises the novel harness and the novel parts and relative arrangement of such parts, as shown in the drawings and as will be hereinafter more particularly described and defined.

In the accompanying drawings I have shown my invention embodied in an illustrative harness, and it will be understood that variations may be made in the form and arrangement of parts, and that certain of the parts illustrated in connec- 55 The present binding is tion with my copending application, referred to above, may be added to or incorporated in the present invention.

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a part of a ski, the harness, and a boot, in operative position, and with parts in their normal positions.

Figure 2 is a similar view, showing parts in the position they might assume while climbing.

Figure 3 is a similar view, the boot being omitted, illustrating an abnormal position of the parts of the binding.

Figure 4 is a plan View of the harness, with the spring relaxed, but illustrating an alternative form of toe clamp.

Figure 5 is a transverse section through the ski, boot and binding, taken substantially on the line 55 of Figures 1 and 6.

Figure 6 is a bottom plan view of a part of the sole of the ski boot, showing a sole plate secured thereto, such as may be employed in conjunction with my binding.

The principal parts of the harness are a base plate l, adapted for securement to the ski S, a toe plate 2 adapted for engagement by the forward portion of the sole b of a boot B, and spring means 3 engageable with the heel H of the boot, and extending thence forwardly, toproduce a forwardly and downwardly acting force on the heel, tending to hold it to the ski. A heel plate, as illustrated in my copending application, might be employed if desired.

The base plate I is suitably secured to the ski, as by the screws H). The toe plate 2 is movable relative to the base plate in. such a way as to move the rear end of the toe plate upwardly, and. the forward end of the toe plate rearwardly. It is not objectionable that the forward end of the toe plate also move downwardly. It is therefore possible to interengage the toe plate and the base plate for movement of the toe plate relative to the base plate about a transverse axis A which is located above the upper surface of the base plate and ski, and preferably rearwardly of the forward end of the toe plate and boot B, or at least not forwardly thereof. If the axis A were forwardly of the forward end of the toe plate, the toe would rise above the ski with any pivotal action, and proper control of the ski would be lost.

This guiding interengagement may take the form of guides which are circular arcs, lil on the base plate and 20 on the toe plate, which closely engage each other to permit rocking movement of the toe plate, but to prevent any bodily side wise or twisting movement. The upper surface of ,the base plate, then, may be formed with an arcuate depression, as best seen in Figure 3, and the ski may be transversely grooved to receive this depressed portion of the base plate. This does not weaken the ski inasmuch as the metal base plate strengthens it more than the strength that is lost by the grooving of the ski, and, furthermore, the weakest part of a ski is usually near the tips. The two guides l5] and 28 may be engageable by movement of the toe plate about the axis A to engage the ends of the guides, and any such relative position of the two plates at disengagement is beyond the position that would be assumed by them during any normal use of the ski, so that there is no danger of accidental disengagement of the guides l0 and 20. V

The boot should be engageable with the toe plate by means which are readily engageable and disengageable, when desired, and preferably by means which are engageable by forward movement of the boot relative to the toe plate, and

disengageable only by relative rearward movement of the boot. Two such means are shown. In Figure 4 the usual type of clamps 2| is illustrated as secured to and upstanding from the edges of the toe plate, for engagement with the side edges of the boot sole 0, which is usually protected by metal edges. These clamps 2! may be adjustable, if preferred, in any well known manner, and it may be observed that space is permitted beneath the toe plate for the accommodation of any such adjusting means. Preferably, however, the toe plate is provided with an undercut groove 22 (see Figure 5) opening rearwardly, within which is engageable a sole plate :1 (Figure 6), which is adapted to be secured to the sole of the boot, adjacent the toe thereof, by means such as the screws 40.

The toe plate 2 normally should lie substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate l, as shown in Figure 1, and the heel H-should be held down tightly to the ski, and should be pulled forwardly to prevent disengagement of the sole plate 4, or of the edges of the sole from the clamps 2|. To this end I employ a spring 3 of considerable length, strength and elasticity, which engages the heel H, preferably within a groove h, and which extends forwardly and preferably somewhat downwardly. At least it extends forwardly in a direction which passes beneath the axis A, and thus produces a tendency, acting through the sole of the boot B, to turn the forward edge of the toe plate slightly upwardly, and to pull the heel H tightly down upon the ski. The spring, at its forward end, may be anchored in any suitable manner, and might be provided with means for adjustment, as is common in bindings, though preferably a spring as long as is possible is employed, and different springs may be employed for different sizes of shoe, or for different desired tensions. The spring 3 is shown as provided with a clip 3!] at its forward end, having'a keyhole aperture 3| therein for engagement with a stud l3 carried by an ear l2 which depends from the base plate I, at each side of the ski. The stud i3 might be secured in any suitable manner to receive the clip 38, and indeed for that type of binding, typified by the wellknown Kandahar binding, wherein a cable is secured in frontof the toe of the boot, the stud l3 might be replaced by a suitable guide for the cable, the latter forming an extension of the spring.

Now with the boot engaged with the toe plate, and with the heel spring 3 engaged with the heel, the spring, which should produce considerable forwardly and downwardly acting force on the heel, holds the heel rather firmly to the ski, and the harness is thus suitable for downhill runnin slalom racing, or even for jumping. in climbing, however, or if in cross country work, it is necessary to raise the heel, the boot, if it has no stiffening plate in its sole, will flex, as indicated in Figure 2, and the heel may be raised upon the application of sufificient force, such as would be exerted in climbing. Indeed, if necessary, or if the ski boots sole is inflexible, the toe plate 2 may rock about the axis A, as is shown in Figure 2, the spring yielding, yet the spring will return theheel to the ski with adequate force when the displacing force is removed.

If, now, the skier falls forwardly, the spring will yield, the toe plate will rock in the manner indicated in Figure 3, with relation to the base plate, and the skier may fall forward, and may in fact kneel on his ski, without injury to himself or to the ski or binding.

It will be observed that a bar or arcuate surface 25 is formed on the toe plate 2, in wiping contact with the arcuate portion of the base plate I. If snow or ice tends to pack between the toe plate 2 and the arcuate guides or portion of the base plate, this bar 25 in wiping contact with the arcuate surface will clean the surface automatically and break loose any packed snow or ice, and it has been found in practice that the device is automatically self-clearing under all conditions.

Competitive skiers, in downhill racing, lean forward from the heels, and such skiers do not want the heel to lift, at least, no more than may be permitted by the slight flexibility of the sole of the ski boot, reinforced by a steel plate. To enable the present harness to meet the special requirements of such skiers, in competition, yet to be adapted to their uses in pleasure skiing, and equally to the uses of non-competitors, or skiers of average ability, or beginners, I may provide a lock 5, guided at IS on the base plate, and engageable beneath the forward edge of the toe plate 2, as seen in Figure 1. This may be, and ordinarily would be, retracted, as in Figure 2, but is ready for use when desired. A look screw 56, received in the base plate I, will secure it in either position, the base plate having two spaced holes for the reception of the lock screw to secure the lock 5 in operative or inoperative positions (see Figure 4) What I claim as my invention is:

l. A ski harness comprising a toe plate adapted for engagement by the toe portion of a boo-t, means supporting the toe plate on a ski for move ment of its rear end upwardly and its forward end rearwardly, and spring means engageable with the rear portion of the boot to produce pressure of the heel of such boot downwardly upon the ski.

2. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, interengaged means carried by the respective plates and guiding the toe plate for movement of its rear end upwardly from a normal position, substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate, and of its forward end rearwardly, and spring means engageable with the heel of the boot and extending forwardly and downwardly to exert a downward pressure on the heel to hold it to the ski, but yieldable upon the occurrence of an extraordinary force, to permit the aforesaid departure of the toe plate from its normal position.

3. In a ski harness, a member adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and means on said member guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the member about a transverse axis which is located above the boots sole and not forwardly of the end of the boots toe.

4. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and normally lying substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate, and means on the base plate guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the base plate about a transverse axis which is disposed rearwardly of the forward end of the toe plate.

5. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a foot, and normally lying substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate, and means on the base plate guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the base plate about a transverse axis which is located above the plane of the base plate and behind the forward end of the toe plate.

6. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and normally lying substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate, and means on the base plate guiding the toe plate for movement in a circular arcuate path relative to the base plate about a transverse axis which is disposed above the plane of the base plate, and spring means engageable with the rear portion of the boot to hold the heel thereof normally to the ski, but yiel-dable upon the occurrence of an extraordinary force.

7. A ski harness comprising a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and having an arcuate guide, the axis whereof extends transversely, spaced above the upper surface of the toe plate and behind theboots toe,a plateadapted for securement to a ski, and having an arcuate guide complemental to and engageable with the guide on the toe plate.

8. A ski harness comprising a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and having an arcuate guide, the axis whereof extends transversely, spaced above the upper surface of the toe plate and behind the boots toe, a plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and having an arcuate guide complemental to and engageable with the guide on the toe plate, and a spring extending from the heel of the boot forwardly and generally downwardly, to hold the heel to the ski.

9. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot by forward movement of the boot relative to the toe plate, and for disengagement only by relative rearward movement of the boot, means on the base plate guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the base plate, from a normal position wherein the toe plate lies substantially in the plane of the upper surface of the base plate, about a transverse axis disposed above such plane and rearwardly of the normal position of the forward end of the toe plate, and spring means engageable with the heel of the boot and extending forwardly, to prevent accidental disengagement of the boot from the toe plate, and to hold the heel of the boot to the ski.

10. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, and having an arcuate guide, the axis whereof extends transversely, spaced above the upper surface of the base plate, a toe plate having a slot opening rearwardly, and having an arcuate guide complemental to and engageable with the guide on the base plate, a sole plate adapted for securement to the sole of a boot, adjacent the toe, and shaped to engage within said slot, and to be disengaged therefrom only by relative rearward movement of the boo-t to which it is secured, and a spring engageable with the heel of the boot and extending forwardly, in a line extending beneath the axis of the guides, to hold the heel down upon the ski, and to prevent accidental disengagement of the sole plate from its slot.

11. A ski harness comprising a plate adapted for securement to a ski, and having an arcuate surface extending transversely of the ski, the axis whereof lies above such arcuate surface, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, complemental guide means on the two plates for rocking movement of the toe plate about such axis, and the toe plate having an edge in wiping contact with the arcuate surface of the base plate, in all positions of the toe plate, to clear snow and ice therefrom.

12. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, and having an arcuate guide, the axis whereof extends transversely, spaced above the upper surface of the base plate, a toe plate having an arcuate guide complemental to and engageable with the guide on the base plate, said toe plate being adapted for engagement by a boot by relative forward movement of the latter, ears depending from the base plate at each side of the ski, and a spring extending from the heel of the boot forwardly at each side, and engageable with said ears to produce a forwardly and downwardly acting force on the sole and heel.

13. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate, means connecting the toe plate to the base plate and guiding the toe plate for relative movement, to swing its rear end upwardly and its forward end rearwarcll and means to lock the toe plate against such movement, at will.

14. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate, means connecting the toe plate to the base plate and guiding the toe plate for relative movement, to swing its rear end upwardly and its forward end rearwardly, and a lock mounted on the ski and engageable at will beneath the forward end of the toe plate, to prevent such movement thereof.

15. A ski harness comprising a plate adapted for securement to a ski, and formed with a circular arcuate guide, the axis whereof is disposed transversely of the ski and above such guide, and a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and formed with a complemental guide engageable with the first guide for rocking movement of the toe plate about such axis.

16. A ski harness comprising a plate adapted for securement to a ski, and formed with a circular arcuate guide, the axis whereof is disposed transversely of the ski and above such guide, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and formed with a complemental guide engageable with the first guide for rocking movement of the toe plate about such axis, and a lock mounted upon the ski, forwardly of the toe plate, and movable at will to engage beneath the forward end of the toe plate, to prevent upward movement of the rear end of the toe plate.

17. A ski harness comprising a base plate adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, means connecting the toe plate and the base plate, and guiding the toe plate for movement relative tothe base plate, from a normal position wherein the toe plate lies substantially in the plane of the skis upper surface, to an abnormal tilted position, wherein the rear end of the toe plate is disposed above such plane and the forward end of the toe plate is disposed below such plane, the base plate having a portion depressed beneath such plane to accommodate such movement of the toe plate, when necessary, into abnormal position.

18. A ski harness comprising a member adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and normally lying substantially in the general plane of the upper surface of the ski, and means on said member guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the member in an are substantially centered in a transverse axis spaced materially above the boots sole.

19. A ski harness comprising a member adapted for securement to a ski, a toe plate adapted for engagement by a boot, and normally lying substantially in the general plane 01 the upper surface of the ski, means on said member guiding the toe plate for movement relative to the member in an are substantially centered in a transverse axis spaced materially above the boots sole, and spring-urged means engageable with the heel of the boot, and urging such heel forwardly and downwardly.

RICHARD B. TAFT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4029336 *Oct 20, 1975Jun 14, 1977Haimerl Dennis JConvertible ski binding
US4268063 *Aug 7, 1978May 19, 1981Vereinigte Baubeschlagfabriken Gretsch And Co. GmbhCross country ski binding
US4452467 *Jul 13, 1982Jun 5, 1984Trak Sportartikel GmbhCross country ski
US4836572 *Apr 21, 1987Jun 6, 1989Nordica S.P.A.Ski binding, particularly for cross-country skiing
US5769444 *Jul 30, 1996Jun 23, 1998Mason; James FrederickSnowshoe binding
US5924719 *Jan 27, 1998Jul 20, 1999Salomon S.A.Apparatus for attaching a gliding element to a shoe
US6017050 *Oct 11, 1996Jan 25, 2000Salomon S.A.Assembly for binding a boot to a gliding element
US6209903Jan 13, 1999Apr 3, 2001Salomon S.A.Apparatus for attaching a gliding element to a shoe
US6308979 *Jan 28, 1999Oct 30, 2001James A. LudlowReleasable cross country ski binding
US6390494 *Nov 29, 2000May 21, 2002Skis Rossignol S.ACross-country ski binding
US6467796 *Mar 10, 2000Oct 22, 2002Joshua WeltmanSki binding assembly
US6964428 *Jan 20, 2004Nov 15, 2005Salomon S.A.Device for binding a boot to a sports article
US7216888 *Nov 12, 2005May 15, 2007Black Diamond Equipment, Ltd.Binding system
US7320474Sep 20, 2005Jan 22, 2008Salomon S.A.Device for binding a boot to a sports article
US7644947 *Jul 7, 2005Jan 12, 2010Salomon S.A.S.Device for binding a boot to a sports article having a separate elastic return system
US8366138 *May 12, 2010Feb 5, 2013Kuusamon Uistin OyBinding for fastening a boot
US9050521 *Sep 1, 2004Jun 9, 2015Salomon S.A.S.Cross-country ski system provided with a direct bearing lateral surface
US20040164519 *Jan 20, 2004Aug 26, 2004Salomon S.A.Device for binding a boot to a sports article
US20060012151 *Jul 7, 2005Jan 19, 2006Salomon S.A.Device for binding a boot to a sports article having a separate elastic return system
US20060012152 *Sep 20, 2005Jan 19, 2006Salomon S.A.Device for binding a boot to a sports article
US20060087102 *Oct 20, 2005Apr 27, 2006Peter ColesReleasable systems
US20070040357 *Sep 1, 2004Feb 22, 2007Francois GirardCross-country ski system provided with a direct bearing lateral surface
US20070108736 *Nov 12, 2005May 17, 2007Black Diamoned Equipment, Ltd.Binding system
US20100289251 *May 12, 2010Nov 18, 2010Kuusamon Uistin OyBinding, e.g. ski binding
US20100314854 *Jun 15, 2010Dec 16, 2010Salomon S.A.S.Ski binding and ski therefor
EP1839711A1 *Nov 3, 1999Oct 3, 2007ATOMIC Austria GmbHPivotable connecting device between a piece of sports equipment and shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/614
International ClassificationA63C9/00, A63C9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63C9/02
European ClassificationA63C9/02