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Publication numberUS2172682 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1939
Filing dateJun 24, 1938
Publication numberUS 2172682 A, US 2172682A, US-A-2172682, US2172682 A, US2172682A
InventorsStephen Joseph Rauba
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Soldering iron holder
US 2172682 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 12, 1939- s. J. RAUBA 2,172,682

SOLDERING IRON HOLDER Filed June 24, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet l Inventor tfia aZenj azzba 4/ Attorneys P 12, 1939- s. J. RAUBA 2,172,682

SOLDERING IRON HOLDER Filed June-24, 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Inventor 512975022 ZdzAZYa By V MM A itorneys Patented Sept. 12, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SOLDERING IRON HOLDER Stephen Joseph Rauba, Linden, N. J. Application June 24, 1938, Serial No. 215,695

5 Claims. (Cl. 113-111) This invention relates to a novel and specifically improved holder adapted to receive a conventional soldering iron in a manner to support the latter in a position convenient to the user and without requiring care and attention on the part of the user in guarding against the hot iron coming into contact with such articles or things as may be seared, burned, and otherwise damaged thereby.

A further object of the invention is to provide a holder of the character above mentioned which will have the further advantage of affording a measure of protection to the hands and fingers of the user against being burned by careless handling of the iron incidental to placing the iron in a position of rest or removing the same from such position for ready use.

The invention together with its objects and advantages will be best understood from a study of the following description taken in connection with the accompanying illustrative drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a side elevational view illustrating the improved holder with one form of base therefor shown in section,

Figure 2 is a top plan view of the holder seen in Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a view showing the holder in longitudinal section and a second or modified form of base also in section,

Figure 4 is a detail transverse sectional view taken substantially on the lines 4-4 of Figure 3,

Figure 5 is a top plan view of the second form of base appearing in Figure 3.

Referring to the drawings by reference numerals it will be seen that in the preferred embodiment thereof the improved holder comprises a supporting rod or post 5 on which is mounted for universal movement a soldering iron-accommodating sheath or socket 6.

In the preferred embodiment thereof the sheath or socket 6 is constructed of metal or other suitable material and is substantially cylindrical in cross-section tapering to a point at one end and from a point intermediate its ends tapering in an opposite direction and then flared to provide a mouth 1 through which the iron 8, as shown, is inserted into the socket or holder.

The socket, holder or sheath 6 has an upper section 9 that is hinged to the main body of the holder as at I0 and is yieldably urged inwardly with respect to the body of the holder for frictional contact with the iron 8 through the medium of a longitudinally bowed leaf spring II that at one end is suitably connected as at I2 to the pointed end of the holder or socket and at its opposite end is suitably connected as at l3 to the aforementioned hinged section 9.

Also, and as shown, the holder or sheath is lined throughout with asbestos M, or other suit- 5 able insulating material which will serve to prevent the holder, at the exterior thereof, becoming heated to any material extent.

As a further precaution against overheating of the holder without unduly cooling the iron 8 l0 placed therein the holder or socket 6 at the bottom thereof and adjacent the pointed closed end thereof is provided with perforations l5 that extend through the body of the holder and the lining as shown. Also the section 9 of the holder is 15 provided with perforations l6 that extend through said section 9 of the holder and through the portion of the lining material l4 associated therewith.

On the underside thereof and intermediate its 0 ends the holder 6 is provided with a socket l1 formed integral or otherwise positively secured thereto, and said socket has a removable side II that is secured to the fixed side of the socket through the medium of screws I8 or in any other 25 suitable manner.

The socket l1 accommodates therein a ball or spherical element I9 provided on the upper end of the supporting post 5. It will thus be seen that the socket 6 is mounted on the upper end 3 of the post 5 to be rotated in any and all directions so that the socket may be angled to the desired position of adjustment according to the discretion and convenience of the user.

For use with the supporting post or standard 35 5 there is provided a suitable base, which, as shown in Figure 1 and indicated by the reference numeral 20, is in the form of a rubber vacuum cup provided with a socket 2| to receive the lower end of the post 5. Obviously the base 20, being of vacuum cup form, may be readily applied to a floor surface or any other suitable supporting surface and will have a positive gripping action thereon so as to support the complete assembly in a positive and efficient manner and against being accidentally displaced.

For use in lieu of the suction cup base 20 there is provided a base 22 which may be formed of metal and may be of any suitable design, preferably of the star design shown in Figure 5. Base 22 is provided with apertures 23 for receiving screws or other fastening elements through the medium of which it may be positively secured to a work bench or the like. At the center thereof the base 22 is provided with a socket 24 to accommodate the lower end of the post 5 which may be secured in the socket through the medium of a set screw or other suitable fastening element 25 as shown in Figure 3.

From the above it will be seen that I have provided a holder for soldering irons and the like which may be readily set up on a floor, work bench, or other suitable supporting surface and which when so set up will serve as an efiicient holder for soldering irons to the end that the user thereof may be protected against injury due to burns as a result of careless handling of the iron, the device also serving as a protection against injury and damage occurring to floors, floor-covering and the like with which the iron when placed on make-shift holders, as is now the general practice, is likely to come into contact.

It is thought that a clear understanding of the construction, utility, and advantages of a holder embodying the features of the present invention will be had without a more detailed description.

Having thus described the invention what is claimed as new is:

1. In a holder for soldering irons and analogous tools, an elongated socket member tapering from a point intermediate its ends to a point at one end and from said point intermediate its ends tapering towards the opposite end and then flaring at said opposite end to provide a flared inlet mouth for the socket, and said socket at said one end having a hinged section and a spring device connected therewith normally urging the hinged section inwardly of the socket for irictional contact with the soldering iron positioned within the socket.

2. In a holder for soldering irons and analogous tools, an elongated socket member tapering from a point intermediate its ends to a point at one end and from said point intermediate its ends tapering towards the opposite end and then flaring at said opposite end to provide a flared inlet mouth for the socket, and said socket at said one end having a hinged section and a spring device connected therewith normally urging the hinged section inwardly of the socket for frictional contact with the soldering iron positioned within the socket, and said socket being lined throughout with insulating material.

3. In a holder for soldering irons and analogous tools, an elongated socket member tapering from a point intermediate its ends to a point at one end and from said point intermediate its ends tapering towards the opposite end and then flaring at said opposite end to provide a flared inlet mouth for the socket, and said socket at said one end having a hinged section and a spring device connected therewith normally urging the hinged section inwardly of the socket for frictional contact with the soldering iron positioned within the socket, and said socket being lined throughout with insulating material, and also having certain areas thereof perforated as and for the purpose specified.

l. A soldering iron holder of the class described comprising a rubber suction cup base provided on its convex side with a socket, a vertical rod forming a standard and having its lower end mounted in said socket, said rod rising vertically from the base, a sheath for reception of the head of the soldering iron, said sheath having universal mounting on the upper end of said standard, being open at one end and closed at the opposite end, the open end having a spring pressed retention element to facilitate insertion and maintenance of the soldering iron.

5. A soldering iron holder of the class described comprising a rubber suction cup base, a vertical rod forming a standard and having its lower end attached to the crown portion of said suction cup base, said rod rising vertically from the base, a sheath for reception of the head of the soldering iron, said sheath being mounted on the upper end of said standard, being open at one end and closed at the opposite end, the open end having a spring pressed retention element to facilitate insertion and maintenance of the soldering iron, and said sheath having an insulating lining.

STEPHEN JOSEPH RAUBA.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3294348 *Mar 3, 1965Dec 27, 1966Cerisano Francis EHolder for soldering irons and the like
US3327981 *May 17, 1965Jun 27, 1967Lockheed Aircraft CorpSoldering iron holder
US3622010 *Sep 4, 1969Nov 23, 1971Renelt Marjorie GenveraPortable ornamental tissue holder
US3858833 *Aug 15, 1973Jan 7, 1975Fink RobertFishing rod holder
US4127251 *Jul 8, 1977Nov 28, 1978Mattel, Inc.Doll stand
US4251043 *Mar 30, 1979Feb 17, 1981Ronny HornerAdjustable soldering iron holder
US4308878 *Nov 29, 1979Jan 5, 1982Silva Wilbur WCurling iron holder
US4660610 *Jul 22, 1985Apr 28, 1987Bath Iron Works CorporationInsulating device for heated working tools such as welding torches and the like
US4671476 *Jan 10, 1986Jun 9, 1987Euisub YimAdjustable soldering iron stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/117.4, 219/242, 248/176.1
International ClassificationB23K3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB23K3/027
European ClassificationB23K3/02G