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Publication numberUS2173528 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1939
Filing dateOct 12, 1937
Priority dateOct 12, 1937
Publication numberUS 2173528 A, US 2173528A, US-A-2173528, US2173528 A, US2173528A
InventorsEdward B Beale
Original AssigneeEdward B Beale
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disinfectant pad
US 2173528 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept 19, 1939 E. B. BEALE 2,173,528

DIS INFEGTANT PAD Filed ot. 12, 1937 55 be desirable. 'Ihis secondtype of. pad will also textile material, or other suitable material. Thus 55 Patented sept, 1a, 1939 2,173,528

l um'rlezn` STATES PATENT ori-ICEv DIsnvFEc'rANr PAD Edward B. Beale, Belle Haven. Va.

Application October 12, 1937, Serial No. 168,666 1s cum (01.15128) This invention relates to a disinfectant pad. be desirable for that type of womens shoe, the Moreparticularly it relates to a shoe form to be body of which consists almost entirely .of a t used for the purpose of disiniecting shoes. portion. Obviously pads may, if desired, similar- An object of this invention is to provide a ly be constructed so as to iit solely in the heel or 5 means for rendering more effective the treatment in any other portion of the shoe. Obviously for 5 of various foot diseases, such as that known as high top shoes a .pad designed to fill not only Athletes foot, by the removal of the danger the footvbut also the leg or ankle portion may y of reinfection from the shoes. Although eiective be used. L remedies for the various foot infections are The absorbent material is preferably surknown, these are in many cases rendered inrounded'with a suitable porous covering 2, such l0 effective by the failure ,of the sufferer to recognize as a light mesh textile covering. This porous enthe shoes as a source of reiniection. The article velope is made of suillcient strength to retain the of the present invention is intended to thoroughly absorbent material when it is forced into the cleanse the shoes of infectious organisms between shoe. However, it is preferably of an open mesh wear-ings. such as will permit actual contact of the ab- 15 A further object of this invention is to provide sorbent material with practically the entire inan article for disinfecting shoes which contains terior surface of the shoe; l the predetermined proper amount of disinfecting A tab 3 or other suitable handle may be se agent, thus eliminating guess work on the part curely anchored to either the porous covering or of the user. ln this way any danger oi insufthe body of absorbent material or both, in such 20 iicient treatment or of overtreatment, with cona position as to facilitate removal of the used sequent injury to the shoe, is avoided. pad from the shoe. Such a tab, or hanlde may,

A further object of this invention is to provide if desired, be made of a non-absorbent material,

a cheap disinfectant pad for shoes which may be such as wood, metal, coated fabric, Cellophane, or

discarded after each use. light rubber membrane, so that it is unnecessary 25 Further objects and advantages of the invento bring the hands' into contact with the vdisintion will be apparent from a consideration of the ectant when removing the pad. I prefer, howiollowing description and the accompanyingever, to form the pad of a light gauze or tape and drawing, in which: l desirably it can be formed of the same material Fig. 1 represents a side view, in section, o! the as is used to envelop the shoe form. 30 shoe form in use in a shoe, A 'sealed liquid container I of any suitable Fig. 2 represents a side view, in section, of the size is embedded in the absorbent material in a shoe form prior to use, .with its internal liquid suitable position. This container is formed from Container inta-Ct, and. any suitable breakable material. It is preferably Fig. 3 represents a side view of a modiiled shoe a glass ampoule with a scored tip 5 which may 35 OImeasily be broken oiT. It may, however, be a cap- 'The body ofthe pad I is made of a suitable sule formed of cellulosic material, gelatin, or even compressible and resilient absorbent material, a soft metal, which may be punctured by the in- Such as animal 0r Vegeta-ble ber batting' for sertion of a needle or other sharp instrument' 40 instance' cotton batting' kraft paper' carton through theabsorbent material.

board, fibrous paper, preferably coarsely fibrous, If a glass ampoule is employed it is preferably or various spongy. materials, for instance, natural positioned so that the Scored glass tip is em sponge, rubber sponge or cellulose sponge. The

body of the pad is preferably made to conform bedded in the narrow toe portion of the pad v where it may be most easily manually broken off.

rutgy totulsle of thetsh' The resilience i It is however desirable that the ampoule be s the rcrelserof the sliaoesviieiotip gilic I embedded. Sumciemly deeply in the absorbent into the shoe, Thorough contact of the pad with material to prevent the broken glass from workthe egire interior surface of the shoe is thereby mi it; gay tizi 415hedstilirllfalli@ gllr'he rtllbisl assur 0U. 0 epa an 11S n ng e ,.50

- Fig. 1 shows a pad designed 'to nl] the ent-,ire or the foot of the wearer, or both. To further shoe. Fig. .3 shows a pad designed to -nll only guard against this danser. the ampoule may be the toe of the shoe. For infections limited to enclosed in a small envelope 6v of porous but the front regions of the foot, the second type may strong material, such as ne wire mesh, strong when the ampoule is broken, the glass fragments are securely retained in the envelope.

The glass ampoule or other sealed container will contain a suihcient dose'of any of those known effective puritives for infections `of the feet which may be applied in a liquid form. In particular an oily substance, preferably more or less volatile, may be used. Such an oily substance may be a light petroleum oil, for instance any hydrocarbon fraction within the range of petro- Y leum ether and kerosene. such as gasoline or kerosene. When the interior -of the shoe is thoroughly saturated therewith, such a substance serves to effectively discourage the infectious organisms which are present. When used with leather shoes it has the additional advan tage of nourishing and'preserving the leather.

A particularly effective disinfectant composition consists of an emulsion of a light petroleumv oil with an aqueous solution of a disinfectant substance. The light petroleum oil is preferably the so-called soluble oil, which is a highly purified, water white oil which can be easily beaten into an extremely stable emulsion with water or aqueous solutions. 'A suitable disinfecting agent for the water phase is a dilute solution of chlorine or other oxidizing agent in water. Small amounts of suitable emulsifying agents may be present. If desired, various essential oils, such as the various terpenes, may be included in the mixture to give a pleasant odor to both the disinfectant composition and the treated shoes.

When theemulsion is applied to leather, the oil phase is absorbed into the leather and protects it against the hardening and cracking action of the water phase. 'Ihe disinfectant water phase serves to destroy the organisms present on the lining and at or near the inner surface of the ,leather of the shoes. Emulsions of this type are more particularly described and claimed in the application for Unitel States Letters Patent of Edward B. Beale, Serial No. 168,665, filed October 12, 1937.

The entire shoe form is intended to be made up and sold as a unit. It is preferably constructed of materials sufficiently cheap in price that it may economically be disposed of after a single application. The article is used -by breaking the tip from the ampouleso as to permit the disinfectant fluid to run out and saturate the absorbent material. The liquid is carried by capillary action to all the surfaces of the shoe form. The ampoule is of such a size that it contains the precise amount of'. liquid required to effectively saturate the entire body of absorbent material. After the ampoule is broken the form `may be immediately inserted within the shoe where the leakage from the ampoule will rapidly saturate the form and adjacent surfaces of the shoe or the shoe form may be tilted back and forth to insure the complete emptying of the ampoule and saturation of the form before the form is forced into the shoe. It is allowed to remain in place be-L tween wearing or for at least such a period of time as is necessary for a thorough saturation of. the lining of the shoe and the pores of the leather. 'Ihe form may then be withdrawn from the shoe and be discarded. A similar treatment of the shoe should take place after each wearinguntil a complete cure of the foot infection has taken p ace.

A single shape of shoe form will sufhce for various shaped shoes of the same general style since the form may be compressed into many different shapes. Only a small number of different sizes need be provided to accommodate the diverse sizes of the shoes of men, women and children, since the resilience'of. the form makes it possible for the largest size to be compressed into a much smaller shoe without a loss of effectiveness.

Certain variations in the invention disclosed will be apparent to those skilled in the art and are intended to be included within the scope-of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded therein a frangible liquid container.

2. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a. shoe and adapted to be inserted intothe shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entireinterior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded therein a frangible liquid container containing a disinfectant liquid.

3. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform tothe interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded therein an ampoule with a breakable tip. Y

4. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and 'adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and,when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded therein a glass ampoule with a breakable tip, said ampoule containing a disinfectant liquid.

5. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform kto the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface. of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded. therein a glass ampoule with a breakable tip and means surrounding said ampoule for confining the glass fragments resulting from the broken tip.

6. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interiorsurface of the Q shoe and comprising a body of absorbent materounded by a porous envelope adapted to confine .the glass fragments resulting from the broken tip.

7. A disinfectant shoe' form shaped to conformA to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoetin a`relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprisinga resilient body of absorbent material enclosed in a confining envelope of porous flexiblejnaterial and a frangible li'quid container embedded in said absorbent material.

8. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform ananas A to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the .shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of. expanding andcontacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a resilient body of absorbent material enclosed in a confining envelope of porous flexible material and a glass ampoule with a breakable tip embedded in said absorbent material.

9. A disinfectant shoe form comprising a resillent body o`f absorbent material enclosed in a conning envelope of porous exible material, a glass ampoule with a breakable tip embedded in said absorbent material, said ampoule containing a disinfectant liquid, and a porous envelope surrounding said ampoule adapted to confine the glass fragments resulting from the broken tip.

10. A disinfectant shoe form shaped toconform to the interior of a shoe and adaptedto be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the -shoe and comprising a body of. absorbent cotton having embedded therein a frangible liquid container.

11. A disinfectant inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed 'state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding l2. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to con- -form to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and,`when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface ,of the shoe and comprising` a body of carton board having embedded therein a frangible liquid container.

13. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and adapted tobe inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a resilient body of absorbent cotton ,enclosed in a conning envelope of porous exible material and a frangible liquid container embedded in said absorbent material.

14. A Adisinfecant shoe form shaped to con- -forni tothe interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively comshoe form shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and'adapted to be pressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a resilient body of fibrous paper enclosed in a conning envelope of porous exible material and a frangible liquid container embedded in said `absorbent material.

15. A disinfectant shoefcrm shaped to conform to the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and,'when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the entire interior surface of the shoe and comprising a resilient body of carton board enclosed ina conining envelope of porous flexible material and a frangible liquid container embedded in said absorbent material.

16. A disinfectant vshoe form shaped to conform to at least a portion ofthe interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a. relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the desired portion of the interior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of absorbent material having embedded therein a frangible liquid shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in,

a relatively compressed state and, when so in-` serted, capable of expanding and contacting the desired portion of the interior surface of the shoe and comprising a resilient body of absorbent cotton enclosed in a confining envelope of porous -exible material and a frangible liquid container embedded in saidabsorbent material.

soV

19. A disinfectant shoe form shaped to conform to at least a portion of the interior of a shoe and adapted to be inserted into the shoe in a relatively compressed state and, when so inserted, capable of expanding and contacting the desired portion of the interior surface of the shoe and comprising a body of, absorbent material havingv therein an easily punctured so ampoule.

Y- EDWARD B. BEALE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446904 *Jul 19, 1946Aug 10, 1948Frank Brush HaroldShoe tree with a desiccant
US2601851 *May 19, 1949Jul 1, 1952Jones Robert OApplicator for treating skin ailments
US3200427 *Mar 10, 1964Aug 17, 1965Gravett Daley CatherineShoe-tree accessory
US3476506 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 4, 1969Andersen Prod H WSterilization apparatus
US3782262 *Oct 23, 1970Jan 1, 1974Polaroid CorpMotion picture processing and projection system employing multi-purpose cassette
US4058425 *Mar 18, 1974Nov 15, 1977A-T-O Inc.Inhalant disperser
US4774769 *Jun 15, 1987Oct 4, 1988Klaus DollstApparatus for drying and/or warming shoes
US4877018 *Sep 12, 1988Oct 31, 1989Masuhiko TakigawaDevice for deodorizing and drying portion between toes
US5291669 *Aug 28, 1991Mar 8, 1994Rochester Shoe Tree Co., Inc.Shoe preservers
US5542191 *Oct 25, 1995Aug 6, 1996Shouse Financial CorporationFootwear drying insert
US6378224Oct 30, 2000Apr 30, 2002Carol M. QualkinbushApparatus for removing odor and moisture from footwear and the like
US7604623 *Aug 30, 2005Oct 20, 2009Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Fluid applicator with a press activated pouch
US7930837 *Sep 29, 2008Apr 26, 2011Michael James HuebnerPreserver including an expandable bladder
US8099879 *Jan 14, 2009Jan 24, 2012Michael James HuebnerModular preserver system
US8277741Oct 28, 2008Oct 2, 2012Mccabe Colin AdamAnti-germicidal and/or antimicrobial apparatus for reducing and/or eliminating germs and/or bacteria from the soles of footwear and method for use
US20070048062 *Aug 30, 2005Mar 1, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Fluid applicator with a press activated pouch
US20100104470 *Oct 28, 2008Apr 29, 2010Mccabe Colin AdamAnti-germicidal and/or antimicrobial apparatus for reducing and/or eliminating germs and/or bacteria from the soles of footwear and method for use
US20110061257 *Sep 17, 2009Mar 17, 2011Balsillie Christopher HAccessory Drying Insert
US20110078928 *Oct 2, 2009Apr 7, 2011Scott BarnhillShoe protection article
US20140259721 *Mar 12, 2014Sep 18, 2014Biovation, LlcBiodegradable polymer non-woven field boot dryer insert with absorbency and antimicrobial chemistry
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/292, 12/128.00R, 12/128.00B, 239/57, 604/293, 43/131, 604/306, 422/305, 422/29
International ClassificationA43D3/14
Cooperative ClassificationA43D3/14, A43D3/1491
European ClassificationA43D3/14, A43D3/14E8