Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2173649 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1939
Filing dateAug 26, 1937
Priority dateAug 26, 1937
Publication numberUS 2173649 A, US 2173649A, US-A-2173649, US2173649 A, US2173649A
InventorsFirner William B
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple windowpane construction
US 2173649 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 19, 1939. w. B. FIRNER MULTIPLE WINDOWPANE CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 26, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet l 5 M M Z W W. ll'lllj l Sept. 19, 1939. w. B. FIRNER MULTIPLE WIND OWPANE CONSTRUCTION Filed Aug. 26, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Elva w dow gill/M1723. flmzzz Patented Sept. 19, 1939 PATENT OFFICE 2,173,649 MULTIPLE WINDOWPANE CONSTRUCTION William B. Firner, Detroit, Micln, assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Application August 26,

3 Claims.

This invention relates to a multiple glass window pane structurehaving a heat insulating air space between the panes.

More specifically it relates to improvements in the structure of the double glass window pane which was the subject of copending U. S. patent application S. N. 70,182, filed March 23, 1936. According to the application S. N. 70,182, a pair of window panes are mounted in separate channels r in a frame of strip material which may be of metal such as copper, a thermoplastic sealing compound being used to seal the insulating air space between the panes and bond the parts together.

i The eflicacy of multiple glass window panes with an insulating air space to maintain a temperature differential between the panes, is of course dependent on the maintenance of the seal between the parts.

i It has been found that failure of the seal may occur under the more onerous conditions in which the multiple glass window panes are used. In actual practice the temperature differential may be as much as 130 F. If the panes are large,

5 the differential expansion or contraction of the panes may reach proportions suflicient to cause failure of the seal. Where, in addition, the panes are subjected to vibrations and shocks, as in vehicles for instance, the difliculties of maintaining )a seal are increased.

One object of the invention is a frame of strip material having a section of greater transverse flexibility.

Another object of the invention is a multiple glass window pane having desiccating or dehydrating means for the air confined within the insulating air space.

A further object of the invention is a strip material of improved section, adapted to provide a frame for a multiple glass window pane having a plurality of insulating air spaces, using three or more panes of glass.

The above and other objects of the invention will be apparent as the description proceeds.

According to the invention the separating ridge between the channels in the strip material is shouldered so that the window panes only touch the sides of the separating ridge where they enter the channel. I'his provides space for an adequate amount of sealing compound in the channel between the surface of the panes and the separating ridge, below the line of contact.

During assembly, lateral pressure may be applied against the panes of glass, to clamp the separating ridge between the panes of glass and 1937, Serial No. 160,975

prevent the sealing compound from exuding into the insulating air space.

The separating ridge is preferably of bulbous or pear shaped cross-sectional contour. A separating ridge of such a cross-sectional contour gives the strip material a degree of transverse flexibility suflficient to permit of a comparatively large degree of difierential movement and expansion and contraction of the window panes, without destruction of the seal. In addition, there is the advantage that when the separating ridge is more of less cylindrical in form, there is line contact between the panes of glass and the separating ridge, more effectively preventing the sealing compound from exuding into the insulating air space during assembly.

The separating ridge constitutes an exterior channel within which calcium chloride or any other suitable dehydrant may be sealed in communication' with the air between the panes through communicating holes in the separating ridge.

For use in conditions where extreme temperature differential has to be maintained the strip material may be formed to provide channels for a multiplicity of panes greater than two, including two outer panes and at least one inner pane, all spaced from each other by separating ridges and insulating air spaces to reduce the temperature differential between any adjacent panes. The strip material of improved section with separating ridges of bulbous cross-sectional contour giving the strip; material a degree of transverse flexibility, will provide a self-clamping channel for each inner pane, when lateral pressure is applied against the exterior surfaces of the outer panes during assembly, with space for an adequate amount of sealing compound in each of the channels.

The drawings show the various parts of a double glass window pane unit, and a multiple glass Window pane unit, and the manner in which they are assembled.

In the drawings Fig. 1 shows a completed double glass window pane unit in perspective.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section on line 33 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a view showing the component parts in associated but unassembled relationship.

Fig. 5 shows a perspective view of the double glass window pane unit in a first stage of assembly.

Fig. 6 shows a perspective view of the component parts of the double glass window pane unit all assembled in proper relationship with the exception of one corner piece of the frame.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional view of a part of a triple glass window pane and shows, the section of the strip material used when there are 'three panes separated by two insulating air spaces;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged perspective view of a corner piece for the frame of the triple glass window pane shown in Fig. '7.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged perspective view of parts shown most clearly in Figs. 1, 4 and 6,- and forming the end pieces of the chamber provided in the exterior channel of the strip .material, to contain the dehydrating agent.

Referring now particularly to Figs. 1 to 6.

The panes of glass l and 2 are held in separated relationship in frames of suitable material such as copper and consisting of side members 3 and 4, end members 5 and 6 and comer pieces I, 8, 9 and Ill. The side and end members are cut with mitered ends from suitable strip copper, rolled to the section shown most clearly in Figs. 2 and 3.

As shown, the separating ridge ll between the channels for the panes of glass is of bulbous section, and so dimensioned that when the panes of glass are in position in the channels with their inner faces bearing against the bulbous part of the separating ridge, there is the required separation between the panes, to provide an insulating air space of the desired thickness, and clearance space for an adequate amount of sealing compound 12 in the channels around the edges of the panes, between the separating ridge and each pane, and between the external surfaces of the panes and the outside of their respective channels.

A vent hole is provided through the separating ridge in at least'one of the members 3, 4, 5 or 6, for reasons later to be given. In the drawings a vent hole is shown at l3, in the member 3, in Fig. 3.

Alternatively a series of vent holes spaced longitudinally of the strip material may be provided.

Bitumen may be used for sealing the panes in the frame of strip material. By extrusion into cold water, the bitumen may be formed into a string at room temperature, in which form it can be very conveniently used.

In assembling, the panes and the metal strip being cut to proper size, a string l2 of bitumen I2, is placed in each channel groove of the strips. The two panes of glass are placed in the grooves of one side strip as shown in Fig. 5, and the opposite strip is placed on the opposite edge of the panes. The ends of the. glass panes are then in turn set into the end strips, and a short string of bitumen I2" is placed over the corners, within the external groove of the strips, and the corner pieces are then pushed on. I

The assembly with all its component parts separated by the bitumen string, as shown in Fig. 6, is then placed in a suitable jig, having spring means exerting a pressure tending to squeeze all the parts together into their proper position, and providing pressure against the external surfaces of the panes of glass to hold them against the separating ridge.

The entire assembly, including the jig, is next placed in an oven, and heated to an even temperature sumcient to melt the bitumen sealing compound so that it will freely flow, but not high enough to volatilize the bitumen or to drive off any vapors or smoke therefrom. When such a temperature is maintained for a sufilcient period of time the bitumen flows between' the glass and the channels in the frame and at the same time the window pane assembly is squeezed.

together by the spring pressure of the jig. The bitumen is prevented from flowing into the insulating air space between the panes of glass by the bulbous portion ll of the separating ridge which makes line contact with the panes.

Particularly when the panes are large, it has been found desirable to hold the panes in a vertical position in the oven to avoid sagging of the glass due to its weight. When this is done it may be necessary to provide small chaplets (not shown) in the bottom channel strip, to prevent the'panes from sinking to the bottom of the channels.

The vent or vent holes previously mentioned provides .a definite path for the egress of air from between the panes as it expands in the oven, and for the ingress of air between the panes as the assembly is returned to room temperature.

As the assembly cools to room temperature the excess sealing compound is scraped off the outside of the panes and theedges of the strip material are pressed against the panes (as shown at I! in Figs. 2 and 3, for example), by drawing a suitable tool along the edges.

The exterior channel formed by the separating ridge between the panes, conveniently provides space for a dehydrating agent to remove all moisture from the air within the insulating air space. A chamber to hold calcium chloride or any other suitable dehydrating agent in the channel, sealed off from the external air, can be provided on one or more sides of the frame of strip material as may be required.

Two pieces I4 of suitable material such as copper of the form shown in Fig. 9, form end closures for the chamber containing the dehydrating agent. The pieces I4 are slid into the channel strip before assembly of the multiple pane. After assembly the two pieces [4 are spaced apart the distance necessary to provide space for the required quantity of dehydrating agent in the channel therebetween, by a piece of flat strip material [5. The parts 14 and I5 are fastened by any suitable means to the strip material of the frame to close and seal the chamber after the dehydrating agent has been placed therein. They may be soldered together with Wood's metal which melts at F. As shown most clearly in Fig. 3, the dehydrating agent IE is thus sealed off from the external atmosphere, and communicates with the insulating air space between the panes, through the vent holes such as l3.

It will be appreciated that by multiplying the number of channels and ridges in the frame of strip material, a multiple glasswindow pane having any desired number of panes canbe provided.

Referring now to Figs. 7 and 8, showing the section of strip material I9 and corner pieces 20 for a triple glass window pane having panes 2|, 22, and 23, it will be seen that the "construction is essentially the same as that for a double glass window pane, except that the frame or molding is provided with three channels separated from each other by'two separating ridges 24 and 25. It is assembled in the same way as the structure according to Figs. 1 to 6,and because of the lateral flexibility provided by the bulbous conbetween the two separating ridges, effectually holding the parts in their proper relationship and preventing the sealing compound from exuding into the insulating air spaces. Suitable chambers for a dehydrating agent 21 communicating with the insulating air space between the panes through the vent holes such as 28 and 29 canbe provided in the manner illustrated and described in conjunction with the structure of Figs. 1 to 6 and 9.

I claim:

1. A multiple window pane structure having a frame of strip material for its edges; said strip material being formed with a separating ridge for adjacent panes spaced from each other thereby, said separating ridge being of bulbous crosssectional contour to give the strip material a degree of transverse flexibility, having shoulders in contact with the adjacent panes, and clearance tberebel w. betw en the s faces of the panes and the separating ridge providing space for an adequate amount of sealing compound to bond the panes to the separating ridge.

2. A multiple window pane structure consisting of a number of panesgreater than two, including two outer panes and at least one inner pane, having a frame of strip material for their edges, formed with channels for each pane spaced from each other by separating ridges of bulbous cross-sectional contour giving the strip material a degree of transverse flexibility, whereby all the panes can be pressed in contact with the separatmg ridges by lateral pressure against the exterior surfaces of the two outer panes during assembly, there being clearance space for an adequate amount of sealing compound in the channels around the edges of the panes, between the sepners and being bonded thereto by the sealing 25 compound.

WILLIAM B. FIRNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2578120 *Jan 15, 1946Dec 11, 1951Zeman LouisGuide for window sashes
US2605519 *Jan 12, 1946Aug 5, 1952Bugenhagen George HMultipane window sash
US3105274 *May 19, 1961Oct 1, 1963Armstrong Patents Co LtdMultiple glass pane glazing unit and method of fabrication
US3226903 *Dec 5, 1963Jan 4, 1966Morris A LillethunInsulated stained glass window
US3345791 *Nov 17, 1965Oct 10, 1967Multipane Inc U S AMultiple pane window units
US4171601 *Mar 9, 1978Oct 23, 1979Usm CorporationInsulated glazing unit
US4500572 *Jun 30, 1983Feb 19, 1985Francis Geoffrey VStructural spacer glazing with connecting spacer device
US4552790 *Feb 24, 1984Nov 12, 1985Francis Geoffrey VGlass insulator, hermetic sealing, buildings
US4581869 *Dec 29, 1983Apr 15, 1986Knoll International, Inc.Panel construction for an office system
US4651482 *Apr 10, 1985Mar 24, 1987Ryszard BorysCorner construction for prefabricated spacer for multiple-glazed windows
US5113628 *Jan 18, 1991May 19, 1992Anthony's Manufacturing Company, Inc.Railless refrigerator display door
US5910083 *Aug 12, 1996Jun 8, 1999New Anthony, Inc.Integral spacer for door rail
US5913786 *May 27, 1997Jun 22, 1999Mayer; E. HowardWindow sash
US7332202 *Oct 16, 2002Feb 19, 2008Saint-Gobain Glass FranceInsulating glazing and the production method thereof
USRE35149 *May 19, 1994Jan 30, 1996Anthony's Manufacturing Company, Inc.Railless refrigerator display door
USRE35392 *Mar 24, 1994Dec 10, 1996Anthony's Manufacturing Company, Inc.Glass refrigerator door structure
EP2525039A2May 17, 2012Nov 21, 2012Smits Gemert B.V.Glass-frame-combination as well as window and door provided with the glass-frame-combination
WO1986006132A1 *Apr 9, 1986Oct 23, 1986Ryszard BorysPrefabricated spacer and corner piece for multiple-glazed windows
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/786.1, 52/172, 52/800.14
International ClassificationE06B3/66, E06B3/667
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/667
European ClassificationE06B3/667