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Publication numberUS2174058 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1939
Filing dateAug 11, 1937
Priority dateAug 11, 1937
Publication numberUS 2174058 A, US 2174058A, US-A-2174058, US2174058 A, US2174058A
InventorsMcgennis Cecil Moulton
Original AssigneeMcgennis Cecil Moulton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 2174058 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 26; 1939. Q M McGENNlS 2,174,058

GAME

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Sept. 26, 1939. c. MfMcGl-:NNIS

GAME

Filed Aug. l1, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 KT E MK TR 5A M Patented Sept. 26, 1939 y UNITED STATES PATENT 4OFFICE Application August 11, 1937, Serial No. 158,603

3 Claims.

This invention relates to games.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a, game which will produce conditions during the course of play as true to life as possible,

wherein each player may encounter various misfortunes or successes and as in life acquire additional Wealth or severe losses in speculation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a game which is simple to play and in which the values obtained at any given time may be readily ascertained without complication.`

A further object of the invention is to provide a game wherein stock market values are involved and in which these values uctuate from time to l5 time in the course of play and may readily be ascertained on the market board or boards.

A further object of the invention is to provide an interesting game which may be played by a number of' players or may, if desired, be played by a single player.

With these and other objects in view the invention consists essentially in a game having a board and markers for each player to be moved on the board, the board having a general track divided into suitable spaces bearing indicia over which the markers are caused to be moved in one direction, and upon which the markers are caused to rest, the board having associated therewith a plurality of sets of cards selected by the indicia on the spaces.

Included with said cards are sets of cards in turn associated with market boards having price.r

lists and a sliding scale for determining the market Values, stock certicates being employed which are valued according to the iiuctuating values on the market boards. In addition to stock certificates, play money is included whereby each player may pay losses or collect gains occasioned by fluctuation of the markets or race track bets, while dice are also included for determining the extent of travel of the marker of each player during the course of play and thus for determining the actions of each player, as fully described in the following specication and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 illustrates a general plan View of the game board employed in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 2 is a plan View of the stock market 5 board illustrating the sliding device for determining the values of the stock.

Figure 3 is a plan View of the sliding device for the stock market board.

Figure 4 is a section taken on the line 4 4' l0 of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a plan view of the grain market board.

Figure 6 is a .plan view of the sliding device employed on the grain market board to deter- 15 mine the values from time to time.

Figure 7 is a plan view of a stock certificate employed with the game.

Figure 8 is a plan view of the reverse side of the stock certificate illustrating the loan value 20 of the certicate and the amount for redemption of the loan.

Figures 9 and 10 are plan views of a Wheat certicate and its reverse side respectively.

Figure 11 is a plan view of one of the control- 25 ling cards from the stock market employed on the game board.

Figure 12 is a plan view of a general Welfare card employed on the game board.

Figure 13 is a plan view of a race track card 30 employed on the game board, and

Figure 14 is a plan view of the play money which may be employed with the game.

Referring to the drawings, i0 indicates the game board which is preferably square and is provided around its margin with a track Il marked off into a series of spaces which are labelled in consecutive order from 1 to 50. The board employs a plurality of markers of any suit- 40 able shape or design, one marker being illustrated by the numeral l2 appearing on the space labelled as l, other markers also indicated by the numeral l2 being shown as conveniently placed in the centre of the board ready for use. A 45 marker is used by each player. each of which may be placed on the starting space I4. Dice are employed to control the movement of the markers aroundthe track II and the dice may be used to determine the rst one to start, for instance, the player throwing the highestvnumber might be given this privilege. 'Ihe markers are moved around the track a number of spaces corresponding to the number turning up at each throw of the dice, and the spaces are provided with directions which must be followed by the player when his marker is moved onto any one of them.

The directions in general concern stock market and grain market speculations occurring in spaces indicated by the numeral I3, race track ventures, as will be later referred to, and general instructions noted on the board as general welfare and indicated by the numeral I5, whereby all players in the game are affected. Certain of the spaces such as the starting space I4 and spaces I6, I1, I8, I9 and 20 include directions whereby the player must move the marker as directed or cannot move the marker, but must act otherwise according to directions. Other spaces, such for instance as indicated by the numeral 2l, contain other instructions which must be followed according to direction.

Associated with the spaces I4, I5, I'I, I6 and 20 are controlling cards to determine the transactions of each player when his marker is moved to any one of these spaces. There are four sets of cards, set A corresponding to certain of the spaces I3, set B corresponding to the remainder of the spaces I3, set C corresponding to the spaces I5 and set D corresponding to the spaces I4, I1, I8 and 20. Thus, a player moving onto a space I3 must pick up a card from a set A or set B, .depending as to whether the space concerns the stock market or grain market, and act in accordance with the instructions given on said card. For instance, in Fig. 11, a card from set A is shown with instructions to buy 20 shares of Automotive Corporation from the stock market. Similarly if the players marker is moved to one of the spaces I5 or one of the spaces I4, II, I8 or 20, he must take a card from set C or set D respectively. As shown in Fig. 12, the cards corresponding to the spaces I5 and having to do with general welfare, affect all players. As an illustra tion, the stock market drops five points so that the stock held by all players is depreciated. In the case of set D having to do with race track transactions, a card .is illustrated in Fig. 13 whereby the player wins on a bet placed at the race track.

Associated with the sets of cards A, B and C are market boards such as a stock market board 22, see Fig. 2, and the grain market board 23, see Fig. 5. In the case of the stock market board there are employed several columns of figures 24, certain of which are designed to represent a given stock, the columns being divided oil into a series of equal spaces with gradually increasing and decreasing values occurring in said spaces above and below respectively the center set of spaces 25 which represent par value of the stock. Over the board is placed a sliding member 26 which is preferably of tubular construction so that it can slide over the board 22, the center ofthe member 26 being slotted as at 21 so that one space of figures across all columns may be disclosed. The sliding member 26 is divided off into columns 28 corresponding with the columns of figures 24 on the board, and in the columns 28 the names of the stock are inserted to designate what stocks .are represented by the various columns on the board.

The two outside columns on the board carry figures to indicate fluctuation on the board and the outer columns on the sliding member 28 are marked to correspond with market fluctuations. It will be apparent, therefore, that if a card is taken from the set C and the card is that shown in Fig. 12 wherein the stock market drops five points, the sliding member 26 is moved downwardly below the par value tothe numerals 5 occurring in either of the outside columns 24 of the board, whereupon an intermediate column gives the current value of the stock concerned. The same course is followed when the stock market rises, the sliding member 28 being moved up on the board above the center point or above par value the given number of points indicated on the card from set C and indicated on the board in either outside column.

The grain market 23 is laid out on exactly the same plan, including columns of gures 24, sliding member 26 as shown in Fig. 6, which is divided off into columns 28 corresponding with market ilcutuations and the various grains which may be bought. Thus the buying and selling on the grain market or stock market is controlled according to the card drawn from sets A or B and these cards directly aiect the player drawing them and may affect other players at the same time. Certain cards in these series may control the loans held by the player, as will be noted from the lists of cards appearing hereinafter.

Certificates for stocks and for grain buying are provided as indicated in Figs. 'I to 10, each certicate indicating the amount of the share or the number of bushels of grain it represents. On the reverse side of the certlcate the loan value thereof is given to indicate what amount of money may be obtained on them from the bank, whereas the certificate also discloses the amount payable to the bank for the redemption ofcertificates. The certificates are held by the player as they are bought and are placed on the table adjacent to the game board and if loans have been obtained on them they are turned face. downwards so as to indicate that a loan has been obtained on them and the loan value. Thus at a glance a players obligation can be determined, whereas the value of the certificate may be readily noted from the current prices on the stock market and grain market boards.

Suitable play money is provided so that all monetary transactions may be carried out during the course of the game. A suitable form of play money is illustrated in Fig. 14.

In the preferred arrangement for the game the following certificates and cards are employed.

Stock certificates There are 10 ten share certiiicates for each of the six pseudo companies, as follows:

Automotive Co ratione- Loan value SMO-to redeem, pay $550' Continental R way Loan value S400-to redeem, pay $440: General Utilities Ltd Loan value S400-to redeem, pay $440 National Canneri Ltd Loan value S300-to redeem, pay Slim' Peoples Oil Cor raton Loan value S300-to redeem, pay $337' Standard Steel ompany- Loan value S300-to redeem, Py 830' Grain bill of sale Loan value 8mo-to redeem, pty $330. Loan value #oOo-to redeem, pay $660.

Loan value S400-to redeem, pay $440. Loan value S500-to redeem, Doy $650.

Stock market cards These consist of a set of 58 cards printed one side only, as follows:

Printing Loan value Silo-to redeem, pay $21).

Player has option of buying`10 shares Automotive Co lon.

way. Buy 10 shares Continental Railway. Player has option of buying 20 shares Continental Railway. Buy 20 shares Continental Railway. Plyr has option oi.' buying 10 shares General Utilities Buy 1b shares General Utilities Lcd. Pllalyr has option of buying 20 shares General Utilities Buy m shares General Utilities Ltd.

Player lies option of buying 10 shares National Canneries Ltd.

Buy 10 shares National Canneries Ltd.

Player has option of buying 20 shares National Canneries Ltd.

Buy 20 shares National Canneries Ltd.

Player has option of buying 10 shares Peoples Oil Corporation.

Buy 10 shares Peoples Ox l Corporation.

Player has option of buying 20 shares Peoples Oil Corporation.

Buy 20 shares Peoples Oil Corporation.

Player has option of buying 10 shares Standard Steel Company.

Buy l shares Standard Steel Company.

Player has option of buying 20 shares Standard Steel Company.

Buy 20 shares Standard Steel Company.

Sell your shares.

Player has option of selling all shares held.

All players sell your shares.

Bank calls your loans. Sell shares and grain ii necessary. Bank calls all loans.v Players must sell shares and grain il necessary.

Grain market cards of a. set of 59 cards as follows:

Number of cards Printing Player has option of buying 1000 bushels barley. Buy 1000 bushels barley.

Player has option of buying 2000 bushels barley. Buy 2000 bushels barley.

Player has option of buying 1000 bushels ilax. Buy 1000 bushels iiax.

Player has option of buying 1000 bushels oats. Buy 1000 bushels oats.

Player has option of buying 2000 bushels oats. Buy 2000 bushels oats.

Player has option of buying 1000 bushels rye. Buy 1000 bushels rye.

Player has option of buying 2000 bushels rye. Buy 2000 bushels rye.

Player has option ol buying 1000 bushels wheat. Buy 1000 bushels wheat.

Player has option of buying m00 bushels wheat. Buy 2000 bushels wheat.

Sell your grain.

Player has option of selling all grain held.

All players sell gram. Y

Bank calls your loans. Sell shares and grain il necessary. Bank calls all loans. Players must sell shares and grain if necessary.

General welfare cards These include 70 cards printed on one side such as shown in Figure 12 and are as follows:

Number of cards Printing Stock market rises 1 point.

Steck market rises 2 points. Stock market rises 3 points. Stock market rises 4 points.

Stock market rises 8 points.

Stock market rises 9 points.

Stock market rises 10 points.

Stock market drops 1 point.

Stock market drops 2 points.

Stock market drops 3 points.

Stock market drops 4 points.

Stoik market drops 5 points.

Stock market drops 6 points.

Stock market drops 7 points.

Stock market drops 8 points.

Stock market drops 9 points.

Stock market drops 10 points.

Grain market rises i point.

Grain market rises 2 points.

Grain market rises 3 poin Grain market rises 4 poi: ts.

Grain market rises 5 po nts.

Grain market rises o po nts.

Grain market rises 7 points.

Grain market rises 8 points.

Grain market rises 9 points.

Grain market rises l0 points.

Grain market drops 1 point.

Grain market drops 2 points.

Grain market drops 3 points.

Grain market drops 4 points.

Grain market drops 5 points.

Grain market drop- 6 points.

Grain market drops 7 points.

Grain market drops 8 points.

Grain market drops 9 points.

Grain market drops 10 points. A

Race track card-do not move marker, butplayer must place a bet at race track.

Race track card-do not move marker, but player has option of placing a bet at 'race track.

All players sell your shares.

All players sell your grain.

Bank calls your loans.

Bank calls all loans.

All; players collect dividend of $1 per share on all shares eld. Alli payers collect divideudoi $2 per share on all shares Race track cards Number of cards Printing Your horse loses. Nonstarter. Collect refund. Your horse wins. Colle 2 Your horse wins. Your horse wins. Your horse wins. Your horse wins. Your horse wins.

distinctly coloured so that they can be distinguished at a glance.

Y Play money The play money is of similar design throughout but all the denominations are of a diierent colour and the amounts may be as follows:

X 1o 500 50 x 20 1,000 50 X 5n 2,500 50 X 100 5,000 50 X 500 25,000 35 x 1000 35,000

Total 69,000

dollar bill, two twenty dollar bills, three ty dollar bills, three one hundred dollar bills, three ilve hundred dollar bills and two one thousand dollar bills. When two to six are playing and when more than six are playing, the same amounts are given with the exception that only one one thousand dollar bill is allotted each person. At the start of each game the 58 stock market cards are shuilled and placed on the board at A. Similarly, the 59 grain market cards, the '70 general welfare cards and 50 race track cards are shuflled individually and placed on the board as at B, C and D respectively. The stock market and grain market fluctuating boards are set at par and the markers may be placed on space No. 1, indicated as the start. Following this, the dice, preferably two in number, are thrown by the players in order of their turn, after the initial starter is selected, the markers being moved along the number of spaces indicated by the throw of the dice, whereupon the player follows the instructions given on the spaces and selects one of the sets of cards, as the case may be and buys or sells stock or grain, places a bet at the race track, or causes the welfare of all concerned to be changed one way or another, according to instructions received on a general welfare `card that might be drawn. In this way the fortunes of each and all players are varied one way and another and the stock market and grain market boards are caused to uctuate, the buying and selling transactions in these markets being controlled by the current price. After eachcard is drawn the card is placed at the bottom of the set and the play continues.

In stock market and grain market transactions, the maximum point either the stock market or grain market can reach is 25 above or below par. Should the market be, say, 20 above or below par and a general welfare card be turned up of 6 or more points, which would raise or lower the market beyond the maximum, no change is made in the market iiuctuating board and the card is placed approximately in the middle of the general welfare deck and the player -draws another card.

Should a player hold shares or grain and turn up a stock market or grain market card instructing to buy shares or grain which cost more than the play money which the player holds, he or she obtains a loan from the bank for the amount stated on the reverse side of the stock or grain certificates. All certificates pledged to the bank for a loan must be turned over to show that'the certificate is pledged as security for a loan.

If a player turns up a stock 'market or grain market card which calls for the purchase of shares or grain and the player has not su'lci'ent funds to pay for the purchase, player borrows from the bank the amount speciliedv on each certlilcate owned as well as the loan value as indicated on the certificates being bought (providing the latter loan is required to complete the payment of the purchase), but should the total loan value thus available plus cash on hand not be sumcient to pay for the purchased certiilcate(s) then the sale is obviously cancelled. The players marker remains where it was placed, but the next player plays and the game goes on in the same manner as before. The player who could not complete his or her purchase, being in the same position as in real life. If the market should rise this player would not be able to take advantage of the prot and the reverse should the market drop.

When a loan is made to a player the certicate(s) are pledged to the bank and is payable at call by the bank. The certificates, while retained by the player for convenience, must be turned over so that the loan and pledged side is uppermost to -show that it is pledged to the bank, and the loan is repaid, theamount payable is the amount of the loan, plus 10% interest (the rate set for call money).

When bank calls a loan or loans or all loans, the player or players aiected must pay their loans, first from cash holdings and if not sunk cient sell (first) shares in alphabetical order until sufficient funds are realized. Grain holdings also in alphabetical order, being the last sold. Il market is below par and player cannot meet loan the shortage is noted andthe game is at once iinished and all players sell their holdings and the winner is determined. I

Should a players marker'rest on a storage Acharge or a general welfare storage charge card be turned up and any player has not suillcient funds on hand, he or she must obtain a loan from the bank against shares or grain holdings. 'If all certicates held are already pledged for loans, the player must sell shares, etc., in alphabetical order, pay off the respectiverloans and thus obtain the necessary funds to pay the storage charges. If suilicient funds cannoty be raised by tliisprocedure, the game ls finished as the player is bankrupt. The shortage is noted and all players sell their holdings and the winner is determined.

Should the bank have all of its funds out on loan and a player require a loan to purchase stock or grain, the loan is declined and the player cannot complete the purchase. This should happen very rarely as the combined bank, stock and grain market brokers, etc. should always have funds on hand, unless all the players have won large amounts during the course of their play.

Should the bank be short offunds to pay out a dividend to a player, it must call all loans. If on rare occasions the bank is without funds with which to pay a dividend and the bank has no money on loan to collect, the -gaine is iinished and players count the value of their holdings as cash and the winner is determined. v

The length of time the game is' t0 be played should be determined at the start of the game and finished promptly at that set time unless, as previously explained, a player or the bank, etc., should become bankrupt.

It will be apparent, of course, that the number of cards, certicates, shares and the amount of money and its denominations may be varied. Likewise, the playing board might be diierently arranged while the sliding member on the stock and grain boards might be of diiIerentcharacter. The foregoing preferred arrangement is illustrative of the general principle of the game which is designed to conditions during the course of play to be as true to life as possible.

Various modifications may be made in the invention without departing from the spirit thereof or the scope of the claims, and, therefore, the exact forms shown are to be taken as illustrative only and not in a limiting sense, andI desire that only such limitations shall be placed thereon as are imposed by the prior art or are specifically set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. In a game including a game board having a track divided into a plurality of spaces bearing indicia over which markers are moved and on which markers are brought to rest and a set of cards corresponding to indicia on said spaces, each oi' said cards bearing instructions to be followed, certain of said instructions concerning market transactions, the combination with said game board and said cards of a market board indicating market prices for different market conditions, shiftable means on said market board, said means being shifted on said market board in accordance with instructions on said cards to set the market price for al1 market transactions following a movement of said shiftable member.

2. In a game including a game board having a. track over which markers are moved and on which markers are brought to rest, said track being divided into spaces bearing indicia and including indicia concerning stock market, grain market and general instructions, a plurality of sets of cards, each set corresponding with indicia on said track and bearing instructions to be followed, one of said sets corresponding with indicia concerning the stock market, a second set corresponding with indicia concerning the grain market and a third set corresponding with indicia concerning` general instructions, the combination with said board and said sets of cards of stock market and grain market boards each operatively associated respectively with the rst and second sets of cards and both operatively associated with the third set of cards, shiftable means on said boards, said means being shifted in accordance with the instructions on the third set of cards, and setting the prices for the market transactions indicated by the rst two sets of cards.

3. In a. game including a game board having a track divided into a plurality of spaces bearing indicia over which markers are moved and on which markers are brought to rest, and a set of cards corrponding to the indicia on said spaces, each of said cards bearing instructions to be followed, certain of said instructions concerning market transactions, the combination with said game board and said cards of a market board marked to provide columns, said columns being divided into a plurality of corresponding spaces, said spaces in each column being in alignment with a series of corresponding spaces in the other columns, one series of aligned spaces being provided with symbols of a standard value, the remaining spaces in each column, disposed above and below said series having standardl values, being provided with symbols of gradually increasing and decreasing value respectively, a shiftable member disposed to slide on the market board, said shiftable member having columns corresponding with the columns on the board, the columns on said shiftable member bearing indicia, said shiftable member beingslidable to single out selected aligned spaces across the columns and the symbols therein contained in accordance with instructions on said cards to set the market price for all market transactions which follow a movement of said member.

` CECIL MOULTON MCGENNIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256, 40/109
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00069, A63F2003/00328, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6D