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Publication numberUS2174367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1939
Filing dateDec 7, 1937
Priority dateDec 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2174367 A, US 2174367A, US-A-2174367, US2174367 A, US2174367A
InventorsPaul Hoffman
Original AssigneeAmerican Brake Shoe & Foundry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Welded anchor block
US 2174367 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 26, 1939. P. HOFFMAN WELDED ANCHOR BLOCK Filed Dec. 7, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet l mv NT ATTORNEY P. HOFFMAN WELDED ANCHOR BLOCK Sept. 26, 1939,

Filed Dec. 7, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 /i T RNW Patented Sept. 26, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WELDED ANCHOR BLOCK Application December '7, 1937, Serial No. 178,503

6 Claims.

The invention relates to railroad. track equipment and, more particularly, to anchor blocks, such as are used for connecting the fixed and movable wing rails of railway frogs.

Heretofore, it has been the practice commercially to make anchor blocks either of cast steel or of plate forgings. Diificulty has been encountered in the past in obtaining smooth riding joints between the wing rails and the stock rails. The cast steel or plate forged anchor blocks heretofore used have not been able to provide track joints at this point as good as the ordinary track joint between stock rails. The invention, in its preferred form, overcomes this difficulty by using standard rolled steel angle bars or fish plates for connecting the wing rails to the stock rails. These angle bars are connected by a heavy rolled steel plate suitably welded to the bases of the angle bars.

The invention also consists in certain new and original features of construction and combination of parts hereinafter set forth and claimed.

Although the novel features which are believed to be characteristic of this invention will be particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto, the invention itself, as to its objects and advantages, and the manner in which it may be carried out, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof in which:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of one type of spring frog with which the invention may be used;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged plan view of the toe block according to the invention connected to its wing and stock rails;

Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3--3 of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the toe block by itself.

In the following description and in the claims, various details will be identified by specific names for convenience, but they are intended to be as generic in their application as the art will permit.

Like reference characters denote like parts in the several figures of the drawings.

In the drawings accompanying and forming part of this specification, certain specific disclosure of the invention is made for purposes of explanation, but it will be understood that the details may be modified in various respects without departure from the broad aspect of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings and, more particularly,.to Fig. 1, the invention is shown applied to one well known type of spring frog. It will be understood, however, that the invention has other applications and that it may be used with other types of frogs of either the spring type or the fixed type.

In Fig. 1 the usual railroad ties are denoted by I II and. the tie plates on which the frogs rest are denoted, in general, by I I. The movable wing rail is denoted by I2 and the fixed wing rail by I3. The point rails are denoted by I4 and I5 and the frog point by I6. The point rails I4 and I5 are shown broken away because of space limitations, but it will be understood that these rails are connected to the stock rails in the usual manner.

The movable wing rail I2 is connected to the stock rail IT by a hinged or movable joint I9 and the fixed wing rail I3 is connected to stock rail I8 by fixed joint 20. The joints I9 and 20 are formed, in part, by the novel toe block 21, which will be described hereinafter more in detail.

The frog is provided with the usual spacer block 2! between point rails I4 and I5 and spacer block 22 between the frog point I6 and the fixed wing rail I3 to provide a main line flangeway for the flanges of wheels running through the frog on the main line. The movable wing rail 42 slides on its tie plates I I and is provided with hold down guide assemblies 23, spring assemblies 25 and 26, and a stop 24. These details of construction will be obvious to those skilled in the art who will understand that these parts are suitably bolted or otherwise connected together in such manner that for trains traveling on the branch line, the wheel flanges will force the movable wing rail I2 laterally, permitting the wheel flanges to pass between the frog point It and wing rail I2.

It will be understood that the main line track constitutes stock rail I'I, wing rail 52, frog point I6 and point rail I5, while the branch line track constitutes stock rail I8, wing rail I3, frog point I6 and point rail I4.

Referring now to Figs. 2-4, the anchor block 2'! comprises a pair of toeless angle bars 3| and 32 connected by a tapered plate 33. The toeless angle bars may be of standard construction and the. same as used for ordinary joints between stock rails. These angle bars are of rolled stock and in the form shown comprise fishing portions 34 and 35 engageable with the fishing surfaces of the rail head 31 and base flange 38. These angle bars have a recess 36 which clears the web of the rail to permit unobstructed wedgingaction between the fishing surfaces of the angle bar and the fishing surfaces of the rail.

The plate 33 is made of heavy rolled steel and is tapered according to the angle of the frog. This plate is welded to the lower flanges of the angle bar in any well known or desirable manner. However, it is important to obtain a strong weld between the plate 33 and angle bars 3I and 32 so that the resulting structure is for all intents and purposes a one-piece block.

In the weld shown for purposes of illustration, the edges of the plate 33 and of the base flanges of the angle bars 3|, 32 are recessed or cut away to receive the welding material 40. This type of welded joint may be used on the top surface alone or it may be used on both the top and bottom surface as indicated. The line of welding 40 may extend continuously along the joint between the angle bars and the base plate or it may be interrupted at predetermined intervals to make the joint more durable.

The main line joint I9 and branch line joint 20 have outer angle bars 43, 44 which may be of the same general construction as the angle bars 3|, 32. The branch line joint 29 is a fixed or rigid joint and is made up of stock rail I8, wing rail I3, angle bars 32 and 44 and bolts 45. The bolts 45 clamp the rails I3 and I8 firmly together between the angle bars 32 and 44, the fishing surface of the angle bars engaging the fishing surface of the rails with a wedge-like action forming a smooth joint for traffic at this point.

The movable joint I9 is made up of movable wing rail I2, stock rail I1, angle bars 3I, 43 and bolts 46 and 4?. Referring especially to Fig. 2, it will be noted that the end 48 of angle bar 43 is defiected slightly to permit slight angular movement of the movable wing rail I2. A thimble 49 (Fig. 3) passes through a hole in the wing rail I2 and surrounds one of the bolts 41 and the resulting assembly tightly clamps the angle bars 3| and 43 together, but permits a small limited movement of the wing rail I2.

It will be noted especially that the extreme end of the wing rail I2 partakes of no lateral movement but only a slight rotary movement and in all cases remains tightly wedged between the angle bars 3I and 43 so that the end of the wing rail I2 receives firms and efficient support by the engagement of the fishing surfaces of the angle irons with the fishing surfaces of the rail at all times irrespective of the angular movement of the wing rail I2. In addition, the wing rail I2 has fishing surface support from the free end of one of the angle bars 3I or 43 depending upon which way the wing rail is moved.

Thus an anchor block is provided which provides true fishing surface support to the joints between the stock rails and wing rails of the frog. At the same time, the main purpose of the anchor block anchoring the two wing rails and of holding them in the proper relation is obtained. The advantages of an anchor block of rolled stock is obtained as to strength, reliability, performance and cheapness of construction. It is comparatively inexpensive to take two standard angle bars, cut a heavy plate to the proper taper and weld these parts together.

The present construction is superior to those heretofore used in that for the first time true fishing surface support is obtained at the toe block joints. These joints will now stand up as long as the regular track joints between stock rails and have as easy riding qualities. This increased smoothness is of great importance with the present high speed train operations.

While certain novel features of the invention have been disclosed and are pointed out in the annexed claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a track construction, a frog having a frog point and wing rails, stock rails, joints connecting said stock rails to said wing rails, said joints including an anchor block forming part of said joints, said anchor block comprising side plates made of standard rolled fish plates and a base plate having tapered edges and made from a rolled plate, said base plate being rigidly welded to the bases of said fish plates, each joint also having an outer fish plate, all said fish plates having projecting fishing portions engaging the fishing surfaces of the wing ra ls and stock rails and having clearance spaces opposite the webs and fillets of said rails, and bolts clamping the stock rail and wing rail of each joint between their respective fish plates.

2. In track construction, a frog having a frog point and wing rails, stock rails, joints connecting said stock rails to said wing rails, said joints ineluding an anchor block forming part of said joints, said anchor block comprising side plates made of standard, rolled toeless angle bars and a base plate having converging edges and made from a rolled flat plate, said angle bars being 1w disposed with their base angle portions facing each other, said base plate being rigidly welded to the lower angle portions of said angle bars, each joint also having an outer angle bar, said angle bars having projecting fishing portions 3 engaging the fishing surfaces of the wing rails and stock rails and having clearance spaces opposite the webs and fillets of said rails, and bolts connecting the angle bars of each joint with its respective stock rail and wing rail therebetween.

3. In a spring frog construction, a frog point, a movable wing rail, a fixed wing rail, stock rails, joints connecting said stock rails to said wing rails, each joint having a set of inner and outer standard, rolled fish plates engaging the fishing surfaces of its respective wing rail and stock rail, and a base plate rigidly welded to bases of the inner fish plates, said base plate and inner fish plates forming an anchor block for holding said wing rails and the stock rails connected thereto in proper relation.

4. An anchor block for spring frogs and the like comprising side plates and a base plate, said side plates being made from standard, rolled fish plates, said fish plates having upper and lower fishing surfaces adapted to engage the fishing surfaces of the contacting rails, said fish plates having clearance spaces between said fishing surfaces cpposite the fillets and web of the rails, said base plate made from rolled stock and having converging side edges rigidly welded to the bases of said fish plates.

5. An anchor block for spring frogs and the like comprising side plates made from standard, rolled, toeless angle bars, said angle bars having upper and lower flanges carrying fishing surfaces adapted to engage the fishing surfaces of the contacting rails, said angle bars having clearance spaces between their fishing surfaces opposite the fillets and web of the rails, said angle bars having base angle portions facing each other, and a base plate made from rolled stock and having converging side edges rigidly welded to the said angle portions.

6. In a spring frog, a frog point having lead rails connected thereto, a fixed wing rail held in fixed relation to said frog point and providing a main line flangeway therebetween, a movable Wing rail, spring devices normally holding said movable wing rail against said frog point, main line and branch line stock rails, a main line joint between said main line stock rail and said movable wing rail, a branch line joint between said branch line stock rail and said fixed wing rail, an anchor block forming part of said joints, said anchor block comprising a base plate having tapered side edges and main line and branch line side plates welded to said edges, said side plates having outwardly projecting extensions carrying fishing surfaces, said branch line joint comprising said branch line side plate, an outer fish plate, said branch line stock rail and said fixed Wing rail, bolts rigidly clamping said branch line stock rail and said fixed wing rail in true fishing surface engagement with said branch line side plate and said fish plate, said main line joint 7 comprising said main line side plate, an outer fish plate, said main line stock rail and said movable wing rail, a first set of bolts passing through said last mentioned fish plate and said main line side plate rigidly clamping said main line stock rail therebetween, said last mentioned fish plate being deflected outwardly and having a clearance hole, a nipple in said clearance hole between said main line side plate and the deflected part of said last mentioned fish plate, a second set of bolts passing through the deflected part and said main line side plate for clamping said movable wing rail therebetween, one of said second set of bolts passing through said nipple.

PAUL HOFFMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3976239 *Aug 12, 1975Aug 24, 1976Elektro-Thermit GmbhProcess for reconditioning worn frogs
US4283030 *Feb 20, 1980Aug 11, 1981Bethlehem Steel CorporationRailway switch heel block
US4624428 *Sep 20, 1984Nov 25, 1986Abex CorporationSpring rail frog
US4637578 *Oct 26, 1983Jan 20, 1987Abex CorporationRailroad frog having movable wing rails
US5544848 *Feb 6, 1995Aug 13, 1996Abc Rail Products CorporationRailroad spring frog
US5704570 *Dec 16, 1993Jan 6, 1998Yamato Kogyo Co., Ltd.Welded nose rail used for crossing
US5820702 *Oct 29, 1996Oct 13, 1998Yamato Kogyo Co., Ltd.Welded nose rail used for crossing
US6138958 *Jul 21, 1998Oct 31, 2000Yamato Kogyo Co., Ltd.Spring rail frog
DE3634231A1 *Oct 8, 1986Apr 14, 1988Schwihag GmbhRailway switch points with component locking mechanism - secures components rigidly by brackets through rail webs
Classifications
U.S. Classification246/468, 246/276, 238/280, 238/380
International ClassificationE01B7/00, E01B7/14
Cooperative ClassificationE01B7/14
European ClassificationE01B7/14