Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2174581 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1939
Filing dateNov 4, 1937
Priority dateNov 4, 1937
Publication numberUS 2174581 A, US 2174581A, US-A-2174581, US2174581 A, US2174581A
InventorsClyde Hoge Edward
Original AssigneeLathrop Hoge Gypsum Constructi
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof and floor construction
US 2174581 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.Oct. 3, 1939. E. c. HOGE 2,174,581

ROOF AND FLGOR CONSTRUCTION Filed Nov. 4, 1957 wimzmwmmmmmw 1.\'\ 'ENTOR.

Bow/ma CLYDE H0615.

ATTORNEYaS.

Patented Oct. 3, 1939 ROOF AND FLOOR CONSTRUCTION Edward Clyde Hoge, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to Lathrop-Hoge Gypsum Construction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a partnership composed of Jay C. Lathrop and Edward Clyde Hoge Application November 4, 1937, Serial No. 172,830

7 Claims.

My invention relates .to the .construction of roofs and floors for buildings of a monolithic character.

Modern construction and design call for roof 5 and floor constructions which are more and more resistant to heat loss, but which, at the same time, may be constructed relatively inexpensively. This has become quite a problem in monolithic buildings, wherein inflammable materials due to fire hazards must be greatly minimized, and where the building must be pleasing of appearance as well as permanent.

It is an object of my invention to provide a roof. or floor construction which has a decidedly high insulating value, and which, at the same time, is fireproof, vermin-proof, and permanent.

These and other objects of my invention, which will be set forth hereinafter, or will be apparent to one skilled in the art upon reading these specifications, I accomplish by that certain construction and arrangement of. parts, of which I shall now describe a preferred embodiment. Reference is now made to the drawing, which forms a part hereof and in which- Figure 1 is a cross section of a floor or a roof embodying my invention.

Figure 2 is a section taken on the section line 2-2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a section of a modification of my invention.

There is a system of floor and roof construction known as the Hoge system, which has been in vogue for many years, and which is described in my patent issued August 14, 1923, bearing No. 1,464,711. In this construction, a series of bars or rails are laid in interspaced relation with composition board on the extending flanges of the rails in order to form a complete surface. Reinforcing material is then laid across the tops of the rails, permitting a sag between the rail tops, and slab material such as gypsum is poured over the whole to fill in the spaces between the rails and to cover the reinforcing material. This construction, while being highly beneficial, does not 45 have the insulation value necessary in modern construction, in that the metal of the rails being a relatively good conductor, in cold weather is apt to become quite cold due to the fact that the rail tops are relatively close to the surface. This, of course, in some cases tends to condense moisture on the bottom part or underside of the flanges when the temperature of the room is relatively high and humid. It has also been my observation that the composition board of the under surface, is not as highly insulating as at present desired, and if the composition boards resting upon the flanges are formed of insulation material in order to increase the insulation of the floor as a whole, the moisture from the slab when it is poured, has a tendency to per- 5 meate the insulation board and discolor it.

Briefly, in the practice, of my invention, I provide interspaced bars I, having base flanges 2. Resting on these base flanges and forming a permanent under surface, I provide composition boards 3. These composition boards may be the well-known plaster board, or may be boards having sound-absorbent and/or heat insulating qualities such as the fibrous air-celled boards, similar to Ce1otex and well known in the in--- dustry. In this construction, my composition boards straddle the projecting flanges 2 of adjacent rails, and I find it desirable, but not necessary, to place a strip or a T-strip 4 between the adjacent and abutting edges of the succeeding; boards 3, in order to give a pleasing paneled appearance from below.

Resting on the composition boards 3 and between the upstanding web 5 of the bars, I place moisture-resistant insulating pads 6, composed M mineral fiber or the like. There is a silica fiber and a moisture-proof rock fiber, both of which I have found quite satisfactory. I do not intend, however, to limit myself to the specific insulating material, since any highly insulating material such as mineral wool made from rock, slag, glass, or similar material, and which will fill the space between the under surface board 2 and the top level of the bars I, or even thicker if desirable, answer my purpose. It is a very important fea-; ture of my invention that this space be completely filled with the pads or batting of insulating material completely to the top edge of. the bars or beyond. The fact that this space is completely filled will cut down any substantial air space which would further the breathing of the structure through the cracks, where the boards 3 abut or where the board edges lie on the flanges 2 of the bars. Thus, condensation within the structure will not readily take place.

Metal reinforcing material I is laid transversely over the bars 5 and the top slab 8 is poured so that the reinforcing material I will be contained therein. This top slab may be formed of gypsum, plaster, or any one of the lighter concretes, such as the ones which contain exfoliated vermiculite,

' or any of the gaseous lighter concretes. I do not intend to limit myself necessarily to the material of the slab 8 or to a single poured slab, since I have found it satisfactory to use a preformed slab with a minimum size which will permit the straddling of tWo adjacent rails. It is, however, necessary that this slab 8, whether of. pre-cast slabs, or of a single poured slab, must contain reinforcing material extending transversely of the cross bar, so as to strengthen the same.

The above structure is such that some moisture may get down into the mineral fiber insulating pads or batting 6, but there is no weight resting and exerting a pressure on this insulating material 6, in order to consolidate it and ruin its beneficial features, and as noted, there will be a minimum of breathing space to set up moisture condensation.

In this construction, the entire structural slab is over and above the rails I, and the rails are thereby thoroughly insulatedfrom the outside temperature, which prevents them from con ducting temperature differentiations through the structure. Due to this construction, the total load of the slab 8 and the reinforcing material 1 is carried directly on the bars I, so. there is no pressing upon and consolidating of the insulating material 6.

The above described construction forms a roof or a floor which is completely fire and verminproof, and which has a high degree of resistance to heat loss, as well as permanency of construction and relative cheapness. I do not necessarily have to use cross bars in the form of a rail, or a T, since it is possible to use H-sections. However, it is necessary that my bars I have base flanges as is clearly apparent.

When pouring certain material for my slab 8, it may be beneficial to place a layer of felted paper or composition board 9 on top of the insulating material 6 and the rails, so that when the material of the slab is poured, it will bind to the felted paper or composition board. It may also be beneficial to water-proof either this layer and/or the under surface boards 3 by saturation or coating with some material well known in the art and the above is understood to be included in the contemplation of my invention.

It is to be understood that different forms of my preferred form may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A roof or floor structure for buildings comprising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a consolidated body extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, for the purpose described.

2. A roof or floor structure for buildings comprising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a consolidated body extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, said consolidated body comprising gypsum plaster, for the purpose described.

3. A roof or floor structure for buildings comprising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a consolidated body extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, said consolidated body comprising light concrete, for the purpose described.

4. A roof or floor structure for buildings com prising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a poured unitary slab extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, for the purpose described.

5. A roof or floor structure for buildings comprising metal cross. bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and. supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a poured unitary slab extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, said slab consisting of gypsum plaster, for the purpose described.

6. A roof or floor structure for buildings comprising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a poured unitary slab extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, said slab consisting of light concrete, for the purpose described.

'7. A roof or floor structure for buildings coinprising metal cross bars having base flanges laid in interspaced relation, composition boards supported on the flanges of the cross bars to form a permanent under surface, insulating material completely filling the spaces between the cross bars and supported by said under surface, a layer of felted paper positioned over and covering said insulating material, a metal reinforcement extending transversely of the cross bars and located above the same, and a consolidated body extending above and supported on the cross bars and containing the metal reinforcement, for the purpose described.

EDWARD CLYDE. HOGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2457982 *Dec 9, 1942Jan 4, 1949Deichmann Otto AMethod of producing building panels
US3193971 *Apr 20, 1961Jul 13, 1965Bethlehem Steel CorpConcrete forms
US3269071 *Sep 26, 1963Aug 30, 1966United States Gypsum CoGypsum composition and building construction
US3289371 *Sep 1, 1961Dec 6, 1966Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpReinforced composites and method for producing the same
US4090336 *Apr 14, 1975May 23, 1978Carroll Research, Inc.Insulated roofing structure
US4120131 *Sep 3, 1976Oct 17, 1978Carroll Research, Inc.Building structure
US4267678 *Jun 15, 1976May 19, 1981Carroll Research, Inc.Insulated roof structure
US4685259 *Feb 14, 1986Aug 11, 1987Peabody Noise Control, Inc.Sound rated floor system and method of constructing same
US5930965 *Sep 23, 1997Aug 3, 1999Carver; Tommy LeeInsulated deck structure
US7353642 *Jul 17, 1995Apr 8, 2008Jose Luis HenriquezConcrete slab system with self-supported insulation
US7886488 *Jun 19, 2006Feb 15, 2011United States Gypsum CompanyAcoustical isolation floor underlayment system
US20110107689 *Nov 9, 2009May 12, 2011Paul Michael HolguinFactory built energy efficient sustainable building
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/338, 52/408, 52/612, 52/349
International ClassificationE04B5/17, E04B5/29
Cooperative ClassificationE04B5/29
European ClassificationE04B5/29