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Publication numberUS2174708 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1939
Filing dateApr 5, 1937
Priority dateApr 5, 1937
Publication numberUS 2174708 A, US 2174708A, US-A-2174708, US2174708 A, US2174708A
InventorsHartley M Sears, Rothenberg Sam
Original AssigneePatek & Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stapling appliance
US 2174708 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- Oct. 3, 1939.

FIEJ- H. M. SEARS ET AL 2,174,708

STAPLING APPLIANCE Fileq April 5, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. HJM. SEAR; AND

y 5AM ROTHENBERG ATTO Y.

Patented Oct. 3, 1939 srrarnmo minnows Hartley M.,Sears, Pasadena, and Sam Ruthenberg, Los Angeles, Calm, assignors, by direct and mesne assignments, to Patek & (30., a corporation Application April 5, 1937,Serial No. 134,944

3 Claims.

This invention relates to stapling appliances. The general object of the invention is to provide an improved staple and staple fastening apparatus which is particularly adapted for use in securing tags on garments.

Anotherobject of the invention is to provide a novel garment tag staple.

A further object of our invention is to provide a novel roll of garment tag staples.

1o An additional object of the invention is to provide a novel apparatus for securing garment tag staples in position.

Other objects and the advantages of our invention will be apparent from. the following description taken in connection with the accompanyin drawings, wherein: i

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation showing a roll of.our staples;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary plan view showing thego staples;

Fig. 3 is a plan view showing a single staple removed from the roll;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view showing a staple after it has been bent; Fig. 5-is an end view of a staple being inserted between the threads of a garment; Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5 showing the staple completely passed through the fabric;

Fig. 'l is a section taken on line l- 'l Fig. 4; Fig. 8 is a side elevation of an inserted staple; Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 showing the prongs in closed position Fig. 10 is a. view similar to Fig. 2 showing a slight modification of staple;

'35 Fig. 11 is a fragmentary bottom plan view showing the modified staple;

Fig. 12 is a top plan viewof stapling machine embodying the features of our invention;

Fig, 13 is a side elevation with parts in section showing the machine; l Fig. 14 is a section taken on line l4i4 Fig. 13 Fig. 15 is a section taken on line l5--l5 Fig. 13; Fig. 16 is a section taken on line lQ-ii Fig. 14; Fig. 1'7 is a section taken on line l'I--|'I Fig. 14; Fig. 18 is a section taken on line i8i8 Fig.14;

and

Fig. 19 is a fragmentary, sectional view showing the support 68 retracted.

Referring to the drawings by reference charac- 60 ters we have shown our invention as embodied in a roll of staples indicated generally at I. These staples are preferably intended for use in connection with fabrics and as a result the staples are preferably made of a non corrodible material 56 such. as aluminum.

The roll is formed in suitable manner and includes a plurality of individual staples shown in Fig. 2 wherein the staples are formed in an integral roll being connected by necks i0 and each staple includes a central body portion I i having 6 an outwardly directed stifl'ening rib l2 thereon and extending substantially the full length of the body and having pointed. ends l3 with the edges of the ends curved as at H. The rib terminates near the ends of the neck. 10

The staples are manufactured with their parts a in integral relation and they are sheared off just prior to use as will be laterdescribed.

Heretofore it has been the practice to use wire staples and as 'such staples have burred ends the 16 fabric is frequently torn while the staples are being inserted. With our staple as shown in Fig. 5 the use of a burr is avoided and the staple passes between strands of fabric pushing these strands aside as shownin Fig. 6 until the body' o of the staple engages the surface of the fabric as shown in Fig. 8. In the drawings the fabric is indicated at [5 and the label or tag which is to be secured to the fabric is indicated at It.

When the staple is inserted by hand it is pushed 25 completely through the fabric as shown in Fig. 8, and the ends l3 are bent towards the body with the extreme tips of the ends preferably forcing the fabric slightly into the groove I! formed along the lower surface by the rib l2. This disposition go of the points i3 slightly above the plane l9 (see Fig. 9) of the ends of the staple prevents catching of the points. The ends of the neck Iii and the rib I2 determine the line of bend andadd stiifness in body of the staple while the project- 5 ing portion of the neck adds to the area of engagement with the garment.

In Figs. 10 and '11 we show a slight modification of our invention wherein the staple indicated generally at 20 is provided with a neck portion 21 4g and with a rib 22 similar to the neck and rib pore, tions previously described. One of the ends of p the modified staple as at 23 is provided with straight edges 24 and with the axis of the end '23 inclined relative to the axis of the body of 45 the staple. The end 25 is also inclined but is arranged at the other side of the body of the staple so that when the staple passes through goods-26 as shown in Fig. 11 the ends 24 and 25 will be contiguous to each other and will not overlap. With this constructionlonger points can be provided without undue thickness.

' In Figs. 12 to 19 inclusive we show our im-' proved apparatus for securing our improved staples in place. As showrr-the apparatus includes a base 30 having upwardly projecting brackets 3| at one end. A shaft 32 passes through'the brackets and pivotally engages a U-shaped operating member frame 33. Mounted upon this operating member frame we show a removable housing 34 which may be held in place by a thumb screw 35. The housingis preferably cylindrical and is adapted to receive a roll of our improved staples. The strip of staples extends as at 36 having its edges passing beneath a. U-shaped member 31 (see-Fig. 15).

In order to advance the strip step by step we show a feed device indicated generally at 38 and including a shaft 39 mounted on the frame This shaft is surrounded by a member 33. spring 40 one end 4| of which engages beneath the member 33 while the other end is provided with a contact plate 4|- which is adapted to engage a spring pressed pin 42 mounted on the base 30. 39 so that when the contact member 4| is engaged by the pin 42 the shaft 39 is rotated. Mounted on thisshaft. we show a pairof arms 43 which at their upper end receive a shaft 44 on which a feed dog 45 is mounted to turn and which is normally urged downwardly by a spring The construction is such that when the shaft 39 is rotated the shaft 44 goes forwardly and the dog engaging one of the corrugations |2 advances the strip of staples and when the shaft 38 is rotated in reverse direction the dog passes freely over the top of the rearward staple.

Mounted on the forward end of the frame 33 we show .a housing 50 which includesan inner guide member 5| having a recess 52 in which a spring 53 is mounted andwhich engages a knob 54 on a plunger member 55 the lower portion of which is cut away as at 56 and is notched as at 51 to form a recess 68 which is of sufiicient width to straddle a bending member 6| mounted on the frame 33,

The result is that when the'knob 54 is struck than thespring 53. A spring 6| normally urges the frame 33. upwardly. The forward staple previous to the bending operation just described is engaged by hammer member 65 which-includes a recess 66 to engage the rib l2. The edge 61 constitutes a shear edge which severs the staple intermediate the neck thereof and moves the staple down into contact with a support member 68 which is urged upwardly'by a spring 69 and which rests beneath a pin on the frame 33. The curvature of the member 68 at H where it engages the pin is such that the member 68 is held in the position shown in Fig. 13 untilthe fra 33 is swung about its pivot 32 whereupon the fiiaft 39 engages a cam surface 12 on the member '68 and moves the latter towards the shaft 32 thus moving the end of the member '68 from beneath the staple. This allows the plunger 55 tdpress the staple through the. fabric and against an anvil 13 on the base 30' into the shape shown in Fig.9.. .The block.6| (Figs. 13

The spring tightly engages the shaft and 16) is provided with a slot 14 in which the member 68 slides and with a recess through which the staple slides.

The front wall of the housing 50 at its lower end includes an outwardly .directed recess 50' into which the severed neck portion of the forward staple projects. The sides of the recess 50' are tapered andare spaced apart a distance greater than the width of the projecting severed end. Consequently the end of the staple fits in" this recess 50' and the die cut portion of the staple engages the wall 50 at 50" at its junction with the recess 50'. Thus accuracy is secured and cumulative error is prevented. Thisport for a strip of material having oppositely disposed prongs from which staples may be formed, means to bend a pair of oppositely disposed prongs to form a staple,"means to advance the bent staple, means engaging the prongs of the bent staple to limit the feeding movement, said staple advancing means including a pivoted arm having a dog pivoted thereon, said dog being adapted to engage a-staple, and means to rock said arm when the support is swung on its pivot.

2. A stapling machine-including a pivoted support for a strip of material having oppositely disposed prongs from which staples may be formed, means to bend a pair of oppositely disposed prongs to form a staple, means to advance' the bent staple and means engaging the prongs of the bent staple to limit the advancing movement, said staple advancing means including-a .pivoted arm having a dog pivoted thereon, said dog being adapted to engage a staple, means to rock said. arm when the support is swung on its pivot, a. plunger member on said pivoted arm,

said plunger member including a shear edge adapted to sever a previously formed staple from the strip, and an anvil disposed in the path of movement of said plunger member. 7

3. A stapling machine including a pivoted sup! port for a strip of material having oppositely disposed prongs from which staples may be formed, means to bend a pair of oppositely disposed prongs to form a staple, means to advance the bent staple and means engaging the prongs of the bent staple to limit the feeding'movement,

" said staple advancing means' including a pivoted arm having a dog pivoted thereon, said dog being adapted to engage a staple, means to rock said arm when the support is swung on its pivot, a plunger member on said pivoted arm;

said plunger member, including a shear edge adapted to sever a previously formed staple from the strip, means to support a severed staple,

an anvil disposed'in the path of movement of said plunger member, and means to shift the staple supporting means from the path .of movement of the staple when the pivoted arm is moved towards the anvil.

' SAM RO'I'HENBERG.

HARTLEY M. SEARS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2580444 *Dec 12, 1945Jan 1, 1952Bocjl CorpFastener forming and driving device
US2653316 *Oct 28, 1950Sep 29, 1953SpotnailsHammer stapler
US2701360 *Dec 31, 1951Feb 8, 1955Bocjl CorpFastener feed means for fastener driving devices
US2887004 *Nov 4, 1954May 19, 1959William H StewartStaple having flat depressed head with reinforcing ridge
US2938212 *Apr 20, 1953May 31, 1960Inv S Man CorpPneumatic tacker
US2946059 *Mar 29, 1956Jul 26, 1960Fastener CorpStapling apparatus
US3007169 *Nov 17, 1958Nov 7, 1961FleurFastener receiving clip applying machine
US3279673 *Oct 5, 1964Oct 18, 1966SchafrothStapling machine
US3695311 *Nov 10, 1970Oct 3, 1972Hanigan Thomas JWire tieing tool
US4220070 *Feb 10, 1978Sep 2, 1980Anstett Edgar PNailing strip for nails to be driven therefrom
US4251168 *Sep 11, 1978Feb 17, 1981Groetschel Karl MFastening means for roof mats for mine workings
US4470531 *Dec 17, 1981Sep 11, 1984Anstett Edgar PNailing machine
US4762260 *Sep 11, 1986Aug 9, 1988Ophthalmic Ventures Limited PartnershipSurgical microstapler
US4780038 *Nov 7, 1986Oct 25, 1988Ivan BachClamp for fastening tubes and wires
US4887601 *Nov 6, 1987Dec 19, 1989Ophthalmic Ventures Limited PartnershipAdjustable surgical staple and method of using the same
US4969591 *Jun 27, 1989Nov 13, 1990Ophthalmic VenturesSurgical stapling system
US5303539 *Jan 29, 1993Apr 19, 1994The Gillette CompanyStaple forming
US5890276 *Feb 16, 1995Apr 6, 1999Moore Push-Pin CompanyApparatus and method for insertion of picture hangers
US7267682 *Dec 4, 2002Sep 11, 2007Cardica, Inc.Anastomosis staple
US7722610 *Jun 1, 2006May 25, 2010Tyco Healthcare Group LpMultiple coil staple and staple applier
US8006888Aug 30, 2011Tyco Healthcare Group LpMultiple coil staple and staple applier
US8475493Jun 7, 2007Jul 2, 2013Cardica, Inc.Surgical staple for anastomosis
US8771312Nov 5, 2007Jul 8, 2014Cardica, Inc.Anastomosis fasteners
US8801753 *Feb 26, 2013Aug 12, 2014Cardica, Inc.Surgical staple for anastomosis
US9261125 *Aug 8, 2011Feb 16, 2016Max Co., Ltd.Staple strip and staple cartridge
US9382934 *Aug 8, 2007Jul 5, 2016Max Co. Ltd.Staple strip and staple cartridge
US20030218046 *May 24, 2002Nov 27, 2003Mangone Peter G.Fastening device, fastening system and related methods
US20060278679 *Jun 1, 2006Dec 14, 2006Viola Frank JMultiple coil staple and staple applier
US20100176179 *Aug 8, 2007Jul 15, 2010Max Co., Ltd.Staple strip and staple cartridge
US20100301093 *Dec 2, 2010Viola Frank JMultiple coil staple and staple applier
US20130178878 *Feb 26, 2013Jul 11, 2013Cardica, Inc.Surgical staple for anastomosis
WO1988001955A2 *Sep 10, 1987Mar 24, 1988Ophthalmic Ventures Limited PartnershipSurgical microstapler
WO1988001955A3 *Sep 10, 1987Apr 7, 1988Ophthalmic Ventures LtdSurgical microstapler
WO1989004144A1 *Oct 28, 1988May 18, 1989Ophthalmic Ventures Limited PartnershipSurgical stapling system
WO1994016843A1 *Jan 3, 1994Aug 4, 1994The Gillette CompanyStaple forming
Classifications
U.S. Classification227/86, 411/442, 411/444, 411/920, 227/95
International ClassificationB25C5/16, B25C5/04
Cooperative ClassificationB25C5/16, Y10S411/92, B25C5/04
European ClassificationB25C5/04, B25C5/16