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Publication numberUS2174831 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1939
Filing dateOct 25, 1937
Priority dateOct 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2174831 A, US 2174831A, US-A-2174831, US2174831 A, US2174831A
InventorsStephen V Muller
Original AssigneeStephen V Muller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reversible coat
US 2174831 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

S. V. MLLER :REVERSIBLE COAT Oct. 3, 1939.

, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Oct. 25

FIG

C. 3, X93. sv MULLER l 2,174,831

REVERS IBLE COAT Filed Oct. 25, 1937 2 sheets-sheet 2 INVENTGR.

Patented Oct. 3, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application October 25,

3 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in reversible coats, and refers more particularly to reversible coatsl made of double faced goods by which I mean a composite material consisting of two layers of material woven together by threads which do not constitute either the warp or weave of either, which goods are commonly known in the trade as faced or fancy back cloth.

It is an object of the invention to provide a reversible coat wherein all the seams and edges are so nished that they present an equally neat appearance Whichever sideof the coat is worn outwards, and wherein the garment is made of a single thickness of cloth.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a reversible coat having a reversible strap around each sleeve which may be exposed to View whichever way the coat is worn, or which may be concealed within the sleeve whereby the appearance of a plain unstrapped sleeve is presented.

A further object of the invention is to provide such a reversible coat wherein one side of the coat presents a dress appearance, and the other side is adapted for sports wear.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a reversi-ble coat wherein all linings are dispensed with so that the entire material outlay lies in the cloth itself, thereby reducing the cost of production.

Having thus briefly stated some of the major objects and advantages of the invention, I will now proceed to describe an embodiment thereof with the aid of the accompanying drawings, in 5 which:

Figure l illustrates the garment worn exposing one side, and

Figurev 2 illustrates the same garment with the other side exposed to view after it has been turned inside out.

Figure 3 is an enlarged perspective view showing the first operation when making a shoulder seam, and

Figure 4 shows the completion of the same seam.

Figure 5 is an enlarged perspective view showing the first operation when such seams as the collar or side seams, and

Figure 6 shows the completion of these seams.

Figure 7 is an enlarged perspective view showing the finishing of the vertical edges of the coat, the front sectional portion of this View depicting an enlarged section of the exposed edge of the coat on the line 'l-'l of Figure 1.

1937, Serial No. 170,830

Figure 8 is an enlarged sectional view showing the mounting of the buttons.

Figure 9 is an enlarged perspective View showing the finishing of the bottom edge of the coat and the sleeves; the front sectional portion of this view shows an enlarged section on the line 9 9 of Figure 2.

Figure 1()` is an enlarged detail also in perspective showing the mounting of the reversible strap on one of the sleeves.A v

Referring to the drawings, l designates my reversible coat, which is made throughout of a single thickness of faced or fancy back cloth, wherein the appearance of the two sides of the material is usually entirely dissimilar. It may also be remarked that whereas a coat of one style or model is herein shown and described my invention may of course be applied to reversible coats made according to various styles or models.

To produce my reversible coat it is obviously necessary to make seams between two pieces of material, and to nish the edges, so that an equally neat appearance is presented whichever side out the coat is worn.

Figures 3 and 4 show diagrammatically how the shoulder seam 2 is made along which I desire to produce a raised appearance longitudinally on one side of the joint or seam. 3 and 4 denote the two pieces of material to be joined by the seam. One of these pieces 4 I split intermediately of its thickness along its margin adjacent which the seam is to be made. I place the piece of material 3 against one split portion 4m of the material l with their margins coinciding. I then secure the pieces 3 and 4a together by 5 stitching 5. The marginal extremity of the portion da. which is outwardly of the stitching 5 is then folded upon itself so that this marginal extremity and also the coinciding extremity of the material 3 extends inwardly between the split portions 4a and llbl of the material 4 as shown in Figure 4. The marginal extremity of the split portion 4b of the material 4 is then turned inito lie against the adjacent face of the material 3 with "its line of fold in alignment with the inward fold of the split portion 4a. The split portion 4b is then secured by stitching 6 adjacent its fold to the material 3. It will be noted that in this form of seam a triple thickness of the material lies to one side of the stitching 5 and 6.

Figures 5 and 6 show how a joint or seam is made along which a relatively flat appearance isdesired as for instance at 8 in Figures 1 and 2 where the collar 9 is attached to the lapels l0. In this instance both pieces of material Il and I2 are split intermediately of their thickness along their margins which are to be joined to form a seam. One piece IIa of the goods II and one piece I2a of the goods I2 are placed together with their margins coinciding and are secured together as by stitching I4 as shown in Figure 5. 'Ihe marginal extremities of the pieces or split portions IIa and I2a are then folded back upon their respective portions. The other split portions IIb and |2121 are then brought together and their marginal extremities are inturned to rest upon the inturned extremities of the split portions IIa. and IZa. The contacting folds of the split portions IIb and I2b are then sewn by stitching I5. In this form of seam a double thickness of material extends along both sides of the seam and presents a more nearly flat appearance.

In order to provide a neat, finished edge along the vertical margins of the garment, the material I6, shown in Figure '7, is split intermediately of its thickness for a short distance back from its edge. Along the inner side of one split portion Ilia parallel with and inwardly disposed from its edge I fell a tape I I by stitching E8 to afford some stiffness and hold the vertical edge flat and straight. The outer extremity of the split portion ISa to which the tape is felled is then turned in and sewn or tacked to the tape as indicated at |8a. The other split portion Iib is then inturned so that its folded edge coincides with the folded edge of the portion Ia. Then these two portions ISa and Ib are suitably sewn together as shown at I 9 along their folded margins.

To finish the bottom and the ends of the sleeves I prefer to omit the tape and finish as shown in Figure 9 for the reason that no reinforcement is required to make the downwardly disposed edges of a garment hang properly and if all foreign matter is left out there is less danger of it buckling or becoming wavy around edges which hang substantially downward. The material is therefore split intermediately of its thickness along its edge into two portions 20a and 29D, these two portions then have their margins inturned as shown at 200m and 20h19` and the folded margins of the two portions 20a and 20h are suitably sewn together as indicated at 2 I.

In order to mount the buttons 22 I provide suitable openings 23 through the material 24 as shown in Figure 8 through which I pass a conventional link 25 having a button on each extremity. Consequently whichever way the coat is worn one set of buttons is in position for use and the other button on each link prevents the one in use from being torn from the material.

From Figures l and 2 it will be noted that the pockets 3D are sewn to one side of the coat so that Awhen the garment is worn as shown in Figure 2 these pockets present the appearance of patch pockets, whereas when the coat is reversed, as

shown in Figure 1, the pocket cuffs 3| only are visible. In order to render the pockets accessible in the latter case slotted openings 32 are formed through the material beneath the cuffs 3 I.

Straps 35 are provided around the sleeves 36. The longitudinal seam 31 is split for the width of the strap 35 to permit the latter to be passed back and forth therethrough so that the strap may extend around either face of the sleeve, usually whichever face happens to be outwardly disposed. The inner end of the strap 35 is secured between inturned split portions of the material on one side of the split seam 3l. A button 39 is provided on both faces of the sleeve to engage a buttonhole 38 formed through the strap 35 towards its outer extremity. 'Ihus it will be seen that one set of straps upon the sleeves is all that is required, as the straps are reversible with the garment. The edges of the sleeve material where the seam is open for a strap to pass therethrough are preferably finished in the manner shown in Figure 9.

While inthe foregoing the preferred embodiment of the invention has been described and shown, it is understood that the construction is susceptible to such alterations and modifications as fall within the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A seam joint comprising two separate pieces of double faced material both of which are split intermediately of their thickness along their margins adjacent which they are tobe connected, one split portion of each piece being sewn to the other, the marginal extremities of said split portions outwardly from the sewing being folded to lie within the split material upon the portions of which they form a part, the other split portion of each piece being inturned whereby the two folded edges are contiguous to one another and their marginal extremities each rest upon the marginal extremity of the other split portion of that piece of material,` and the two contiguous edges being sewn together.

2. A seam joint comprising the combination set forth in claim 1 wherein the stitching by which the contiguous folded edges are attached to one of the split portions of the other piece of material extend only through one split portion of each piece of material.

3. A seam joint comprising two separate pieces of goods one of which at least consists of double faced material, the latter piece being split intermediately of itsv thickness along one margin, each split portion being inwardly folded and sewn to the other piece of goods by stitching which eX- tends through the latter and through only one split portion of the double faced material.

STEPHEN V. MLLER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2442749 *Mar 15, 1946Jun 8, 1948Archer Rubber CompanyLady's raincoat
US2515089 *Sep 21, 1946Jul 11, 1950Raphael KamhiReversible skirt
US2696617 *Feb 25, 1953Dec 14, 1954Worcester Gurdon SaltonstallVest
US2759192 *Dec 18, 1953Aug 21, 1956Levi DaisyInterlocking seams reversible garments and method for making the same
US3038167 *Nov 25, 1959Jun 12, 1962Stephen Rajki IncEdging for multilayered fabric and method of making the same
US3085256 *Sep 12, 1960Apr 16, 1963David H Smith IncElasticized garment seam construction
US3155985 *Jun 19, 1962Nov 10, 1964Gallagher Helen SReversible shirt dickey
US3492676 *May 17, 1968Feb 3, 1970Clay B KingReversible garment and method for making same
US3846844 *Jul 18, 1973Nov 12, 1974Ben Kahn Furs CorpReversible fur garment
US4142476 *Oct 26, 1977Mar 6, 1979Hirschman Shalom ZMethods of making feminine hygienic pads
US4631765 *May 13, 1985Dec 30, 1986Casey Susan DModular covering and a method of assembling the same
US4878258 *Sep 19, 1988Nov 7, 1989Casey Susan DModular energy saving covering
US6728970Jan 24, 2003May 4, 2004Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment having reversible shell for military or paramilitary firefighter
US6874162 *Mar 25, 2003Apr 5, 2005Kaplan-Simon Co.Reversible jacket having multiple hoods
US6892394Feb 17, 2004May 17, 2005Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment having reversible shell for military or paramilitary firefighter
US7111327 *Jun 23, 2003Sep 26, 2006Blauer Manufacturing Company, Inc.Lightweight protective clothing and textile material incorporated therein
US7146646Feb 19, 2004Dec 12, 2006Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective method using reversible garment for military or paramilitary firefighter
US7168097 *Mar 14, 2005Jan 30, 2007Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment having reversible shell for military or paramilitary firefighter or emergency worker
US7690318 *Oct 9, 2007Apr 6, 2010International Automotive Components Group North America, Inc.Method of sewing a decorative seam and trim component made by that method
US7703151 *Aug 28, 2006Apr 27, 2010Blauer Manufacturing Company, Inc.Cuff closure for reversible garments
US7739749Mar 14, 2005Jun 22, 2010Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Reversible, protective garment for military or paramilitary firefighter or emergency worker
US8726416 *Oct 22, 2012May 20, 2014Conrad RoblejoLab coat article and method
US20040143883 *Jan 24, 2003Jul 29, 2004Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Reversible, Protective garment for military or paramilitary firefighter
US20040181843 *Feb 17, 2004Sep 23, 2004Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment having reversible shell for military or paramilitary firefighter
US20040181844 *Mar 20, 2003Sep 23, 2004Kim Hong KooReversible jacket
US20040187186 *Mar 25, 2003Sep 30, 2004Kaplan-Simon Co.Reversible jacket having multiple hoods
US20050155130 *Mar 14, 2005Jul 21, 2005Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Protective garment having reversible shell for military or paramilitary firefighter or emergency worker
US20060000003 *Mar 14, 2005Jan 5, 2006Grilliot William LReversible, protective garment for military or paramilitary firefighter or emergency worker
US20060195963 *Feb 19, 2004Sep 7, 2006Grilliot William LProtective method using reversible garment for military or paramilitary firefighter
US20080047047 *Aug 28, 2006Feb 28, 2008Blauer Manufacturing Company, Inc.Cuff closure for reversible garments
US20090090285 *Oct 9, 2007Apr 9, 2009International Automobile Components Group North America, Inc.Method of sewing a decorative seam and trim component made by that method
US20110185470 *Aug 4, 2011Carl JonesReversible garment
US20130227761 *Mar 1, 2012Sep 5, 2013Julie HoskinsReversible-pocket scarf
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/424, 112/426, 2/DIG.200, 2/275, 2/93
International ClassificationA41D15/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S2/02, A41D15/005
European ClassificationA41D15/00C