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Publication numberUS2174857 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1939
Filing dateAug 11, 1937
Priority dateAug 13, 1936
Also published asDE678181C
Publication numberUS 2174857 A, US 2174857A, US-A-2174857, US2174857 A, US2174857A
InventorsMikael Vogel-Jorgensen
Original AssigneeSmidth & Co As F L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal separator
US 2174857 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Get. 3, 1939. M. voGELJoRGENsEN 2,174,857

CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR Filed Aug. ll, 1937 .2 Sheets-Sheet 2 NV NTO .MWI @4' i@ ATTORNEY alemana. la, rea

- Vogel-.Horgcnsem Fredeksberg, near Cop t. magen, Denmark, assigner to F. L. Smidth Company, New York, New .Hersey AApnlicatioira August 1li,

' J between a'rotary body and a surrounding casing,

either rotary-jor stationary, and the heavier partlcles move outwardly and are Adisposed on the inner surface of the casing. These particles are* advanced axially along the casing in one direc- 15 tion by suitable means, such, for example, as a conveyor worm mounted on the surface of the inner body, and are discharged at one end of the casing. The smaller particles collect near'the outer surface of the body and, after movingaxially alongthe body in the opposite direction, are lead away by appropriate means. When an apparatus of this 'sort is employed in the treatment of material containing hard particles, such, for example, as raw cement slurry, the conveyor ights are exposed to heavy wear and any parti' cles that may be trapped between the edges of the flights and the casing are likely to cause damage to the ights.

I have found that the life of the conveyor means in such an apparatus may be greatly prolonged by employing a conveyor worm or the like which operates in contact with the inner wall of the casing, and by constructing the conveyor flights and the inner Wall of the casing in such manner that they may yield relatively to one another to permit the escape of hard particles that may be trapped between them. Thev desired yielding eie'ct` may be obtained in various ways, as, for example, the outer edges of the'conveyor flights may bemade resilient, or the flights may be .mounted resiliently on the rotary body, or the inside of the casing may be lined with resilient material, these expedients being used alone or in combination, as desired. The resilient material which I prefer to 45 use for the ights or the casing lining is rubber,A and, preferably, the ights are made up of rubber blocks mounted on rubber or spring mountlngs. For best results, the ights should make light contact with the inner wall of the casing when the rotary body is at rest, since, with that arrangement, the iiights will be forced outwardly by centrifugal action and contact with considerable pressure against the casing wall when the body rotates.

The principles of the invention may be advan- N. Y.,V a corporation of 1937.'. Serial No. 158,447-

Hn'Great Britain August 13, i936 tageously employed in separators used for separating solids from liquids in which the material to be treated is delivered vto the interior of the rotary body and passes outwardly through radial passages to the space between the body and the 6 casing. In -such apparatus, the casingmay rotate in the same direction as thebody but at a v different speed, and the axis of the separator may be vertical with the body of conical form above the discharge ends of the passages and cylindrical 10 below them. The conveyor means may then take' the form of blocks of rubber resiliently secured to I a helical strip or rib which is directly attached to the conical portion of theA body and is mounted on radial vanes secured to the cylindrical porl5 tion. These vanes serve botir as a mounting for the conveyor means and 'increase the efficiency of opera-tion, as will be made clear.

For a'better understanding of the invention, reference may be made tothe accompanying ,20 drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view through a separator constructed in accordance with the in' vention;

Fig. 2 is a view body;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view on a larger scale showing parts of the "conveyor ights; and

Fig. 4 is a transverse section through oneof th nights on a still larger scale. 30

The apparatus illustrated comprises a rotary body lll which is mounted on a shaft ll, the upper end of the shaft being hollow and having a belt pulley I2 attached thereto so that the shaft and body may be rotated in the vusual way. The 35 shaft l l is mounted'for rotation'in upper and lower bearings i3 and i4, respectively, the latter being shown as of the step t I The body is enclosed within a casing l5 provided with top and bottom lsleeves I6, Il, respec 40 tively, through which the shaft l I projects, and the casing is supported by a bearing i8 on which a shoulder on sleeve l1 rests. Beyond 'the end of the sleeve W, the shaft I I is provided with a gear i9 meshing with a gear 20 fast on a shaft 2| sup 45 ported in bearings 22, 23, respectively,'th`e shaft 2l having a second gear 2t meshing-with a gear 25 fast on the sleeve Il. The construction issuch that the body and casing rotate in the same direc'- tion but at'diferent speeds. 50

The separator disclosed is particularly adapted for the treatment of slurry and similar materials, and the material is introduced from a hopper 26 from which leads a discharge pipe 21 which passes into the upper hollowend of shaft 55 in side elevation of the ,rotary 25 ing outwardly from the interior of the hollow to discharge openings in the The material then enters the portion of` shaft II wall of the body.

. space between the outer wall of the body and the inner wall of casing I5.

In this space is a conveyor means consisting of a helical strip cr rib 38, on which are mounted-a plurality of blocks 3 I.

That ,part of the body lying above the discharge openings is of generally conical form, and the part below the discharge openings is cylindrical. The rib 30 is attached. directly to the conical wall of the body and is supported throughout the length of the cylindrical portion on a plurality of radial vanes 32 attached to the body.` The vanes not onlyl serve as a mounting 'for the strip but, in addition, prevent slippage of the material relative to the body and the formation of eddy currents in the material, thus increasing the efciency of the apparatus. v

The material entering the helical passage is subjected to centrifugal action, whichcauses the heavier coarser particles to tact with the casing wall. These particles are then moved upwardly by the action of the conveyor means to theupper end of' the casing, where the particles are. discharged through radial discharge passages 33. The lighter finer particles collect on the outer wall of the body and pass down between the varies 32 to the bottom of the casing, where the material is discharged through passages 34.

In the construction illustrated, the conveyor means comprises blocks 3l of rubber which are secured to the strip 30 by bolts 35 which/pass through metal cover plates 36, through the blocks, and through enlarged openings 31 in the strip. The under and inner side of each block 3I is supported and protected by a metal plate 38 of appropriate form, and interposed between the under side of the plate 38 and. theltgp of the strip 30 is a rubber blocl38 through'which the bolt passes. AA similar rubber block l is interposed between the under side of the strip 30 and a washer 4I held on the bolt bya nut 42. -The dimensions and mounting of the strips 3l are such that they make light contact with the inner wallv of the casing when the body is at rest, but when the body is rotating, the blocks 3I move outwardly slightly so as to make tight contact with the casing wall. The mounting of the blocks, as

' described, isl such lthat the blocks'may yield and move away slightly from the casing inthe event A.

that particles are trapped between-the outer edges of the blocks and the Vcasing wall. t

The construction described makes use of resilyient blocks forming the contacting members of the conveyor flights, and also provides resilient mountings for these blocks. In addition, if d'esired, the inner wall of the casing may be promove out into conof a rotary body, a casing surrounding the body,

a helical rib mounted n the outside of said body, a plurality of conveyor 'blocks mounted on one lateral face of said rib, bolts passing through the blocks and loosely through the rib to hold the blocks in position, and yielding means interposed between the blocks and the lateral face of the rib and permitting said conveyor blocks to yield with respectl to said rib in directions both radially and axially of said casing.

2. In a centrifugal separator, the combination of a rotary body, a helical rib mounted on the outside thereof, a plurality of rubber conveyor blocks mounted on one lateral face 'of the rib, bolts passing througli the blocks and loosely through the rib to hold the blocks in position,

and rubber members interposed between the blocks and the lateral face of the rib.

3. In a centrifugal separator, the combination of a rotary body, a helical rib mounted on the outside thereof, a series of rubber members located at each of the opposite sides of said rib, bolts passing loosely through said,rib each of which passes through two of said rubber members at opposite sides of the rib, and rubber conveyor blocks abutting 'one series of said rubber members and clamped thereto by said bolts.

4. In a centrifugal separator, the-combination of a rotary body, a casing surrounding the body, a rigid helical rib mounted on the outside of said body, conveying material mounted on one lateral face of said rib, bolts passing through said conveying material and loosely through the rib to hold the conveying material in position, and yielding means interposed between the conveying material and the lateral face of the rib and permitting said conveying material to. yield with re-` spect to said rib in directions both radially and axially of said casing.

5. In a centrifugal separator, the combination of a rotary body, a casing surrounding the body, a rigid helical rib mounted on the outside of said body, conveying material carried by said rib and having a yielding edge in contact with the inner' surface of the casing, and means for clamping said material to the rib including a resilient member interposed between said rib and said material and through which said material is affixed to the rib, said clamping means inclusive of said resilient member permitting said conveying maf terial to yield with respect to the rib in directions both radially and axially of said casing.

MIKAEL VOGEL-JORGENSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2791158 *Apr 6, 1954May 7, 1957Downingtown Mfg CoFiber cleaner
US4298161 *Oct 18, 1979Nov 3, 1981Wilkinson Rubber Linatex LimitedCentrifuge
US5037373 *Nov 2, 1989Aug 6, 1991Richard Mozley LimitedSolids-liquids separator
US5354255 *Dec 17, 1992Oct 11, 1994Alfa Laval Separation Inc.Decanter centrifuge with conveyor capable of high speed and higher flow rates
US5520605 *Jun 7, 1995May 28, 1996Baker Hughes IncorporatedMethod for accelerating a liquid in a centrifuge
US5545119 *Dec 22, 1994Aug 13, 1996Kloeckner-Humboldt-Deutz AktiengesellschaftSolid bowl worm centrifuge
US5551943 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 3, 1996Baker Hughes IncorporatedFeed accelerator system including accelerating vane apparatus
US5632714 *Jun 7, 1995May 27, 1997Baker Hughes Inc.Feed accelerator system including accelerating vane apparatus
US5651756 *Jun 8, 1995Jul 29, 1997Baker Hughes Inc.Feed accelerator system including feed slurry accelerating nozzle apparatus
US5658232 *Jun 8, 1995Aug 19, 1997Baker Hughes Inc.Feed accelerator system including feed slurry accelerating nozzle apparatus
US5840006 *Aug 20, 1993Nov 24, 1998Baker Hughes IncorporatedFeed accelerator system including accelerating vane apparatus
US6077210 *Jun 5, 1998Jun 20, 2000Baker Hughes IncorporatedFeed accelerator system including accelerating vane apparatus
US6123656 *Nov 6, 1995Sep 26, 2000IncentraDecanter centrifuge
US6561965 *Oct 20, 2000May 13, 2003Alfa Laval Inc.Mist pump for a decanter centrifuge feed chamber
US6572524Jul 14, 2000Jun 3, 2003Alfa Laval Inc.Decanter centrifuge having a heavy phase solids baffle
US20130210601 *Aug 15, 2011Aug 15, 2013Alfa Laval Corporate AbCentrifugal separator
CN103052448A *Aug 15, 2011Apr 17, 2013阿尔法拉瓦尔股份有限公司A centrifugal separator
EP2422882A1 *Aug 27, 2010Feb 29, 2012Alfa Laval Corporate ABA centrifugal separator
WO1993012886A1 *Dec 16, 1992Jul 8, 1993Baker Hughes IncorporatedFeed accelerator system including accelerating vane apparatus
WO2012025416A3 *Aug 15, 2011Apr 26, 2012Alfa Laval Corporate AbA centrifugal separator
Classifications
U.S. Classification494/54
International ClassificationB04B1/20, B04B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB04B1/20, B04B1/2008
European ClassificationB04B1/20A, B04B1/20