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Publication numberUS2175117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1939
Filing dateJul 23, 1937
Priority dateJul 23, 1937
Publication numberUS 2175117 A, US 2175117A, US-A-2175117, US2175117 A, US2175117A
InventorsBrady David R, Nathan Hack
Original AssigneeHack Shoe Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe and insole forming last
US 2175117 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

SHOE AND INSOLE FORMING LAST Filed July 25, 1957 IN VENTORS.

R96, 23 24 :Dfir/O P 89/9 2 7 BY /Y/9 77/19 JV/9a,;

ATTORNEY.

Patented Oct. 3, 1939 SHOE AND INSOLE FORMING LAST Nathan Hack and David R. Brady, Detroit, Mich., assignors to Hack Shoe Company, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application July 23, 1937, Serial.No. 155,271

13 Claims.

This invention relates to shoe lasts and has for its objectto provide an improved last which may be employed as a means for forming an insole according to an orthopedic or foot supporting design and also to form the sole itself or to form any other last members such as arch supports and the like.

It is known that when a leather insole is wet for the purpose of forming'that it will thereafter shrink and diiiiculty is often experienced in fitting the sole into the shoe for-which it was made. The principal object of this invention is to provide a last which may beemployed in conjunction with a shaped plate as a means for molding the insole, provision being made for then drying the sole while in this mold, whereby the shoe may be completed on the last after removal of the plate.

Another object is toprovide means for preventing shrinkage of the sole during the drying thereof in order thatthe size of the final product may be definitely predicted from the size of the blank,

More specifically it is an object of the inventionto provide a shoe last upon which a-shoe may be completed, the last having curved or formed portions adapted to receive orthopedic supports, such as may be made integrally with an insole, as, for instance longitudinal arch support, an outside arch support and the like.

A further object is to provide a last for the formation of an insole thereon, preferably, of some light metal such 'as aluminum, having means for heatingthe interior thereof, as for instance by the introduction of steam to the interior thereof, whereby an insole molded thereon may be rapidly dried.

A further object is to provide a plate for use in conjunction with the above described last as a mold member, the plate being provided with a toe cap-to serve as a fulcrum to press an insole blank into the shape of the bottom of the last and the mold member and having reception for the above mentioned flanges.

Another object is to provide a plate or mold member as above described of aerated form in order to permit rapid drying of the molded insole in response to heating of the last, and to provide means in or on the inside surface of the plate for preventing shrinkage of the sole during drying thereof.-

Another object is to teach the manufacture of a mold for use in a press, the mold being adaptable ior making insoles having integral orthopedic supports in the form of upstanding flanges arising, preferably from oppositessidesHthereof.

' pect of the heel.

Other objects and advantages will hereinafter become more apparent as reference is had to the accompanying drawing wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of our invention including a wooden last and plate, looking at the side of the longitudinal arch,

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a metal last looking at the side of the outside arch with our invention applied thereto.

Fig 3 is a perspective of a formed insole,

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of the last, as illustrated in Fig. 2, without the plate.

Fig. 5-is a top perspective of the plate, and

Fig. 6 is a side elevation of an upper mold part and a section through a lower mold part, constituting a modification of our invention.

More particularly, l indicates a last which is usually made hollow and of some suitable metal, such as aluminum. As is customary, we intend that a shoe is to be built on the last, As a first step in making the shoe on the last we place an insole blank in place against the bottom of the last and in order to make the blank take the form of the last we provide a plate 2 the upper surface of which is formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of the last including a flange 3 for the inner or longitudinal arch thereof. In addition to the flange 3, we may also provide additional flanges 4 and 5 arising at the side of the outside arch which will bend the insole blank into supports 6 and 1 respectively one of which, 6 resides aft and the other of which, I, reside forwardly of the tuberosity of the flfth metatarsal bone.

The flanges 6 and I avoid the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone. The anteriorward lateral flange l arises immediately back of the head of the fifth metatarsal bone and ends immediately before the prominent .tuberosity at the of the fifth metatarsal bone. The pcsteriorward of 40 the lateral flanges 5 arises opposite the calcanocuboid articulation and parallels the lateral as- The medial (inner) flange 3 of the innersole is designed to provide support for the inner longitudinal arch. The lateral flanges 6 and 1 balance or stabilize this support.

The flanges 6 and i do not arise at right angles to the bottom of the insole but curve upwardly therefrom, the flange 1 also curving longitudinally. In order to accommodate these flanges B and 1,. the outside of the last has two corresponding portions 8 and 9 formed as just described in connection-with the shape of the flanges. That portion I 0 of the last forwardly of the portion 8 encounters ,the bottom of the last in rather a sharp edge as in conventional practice. The portions 8 and 9 are insets or cut-away curved portions with the edges merging or tapering into the main surface of the last. The shape is such that the flanges 6 and I, which are bevelled or feather-edged will be accommodated therein.

The plate 2 is provided with a multiplicity of perforations I l for purposes of permitting drying of the insole l2 after the blank has been compressed in wet condition between the last and the plate 2. In order to accelerate the drying, a heating fluid may be introduced to the interior of the last l, if desired, by the connection l3.

The plate 2 has a toe cap I4 for engagement with the toe portion of the last. It serves as an endwise positioning means and may serve also as a fulcrum in forcing the plate towards the last against the resistance of the insole blank. When the blank has been completely compressed into place a latch l5 pivotally attached to the plate 2 at I6 is swung upwardly in order that its latch pin I? may engage a hole H3 in the last. In order to prevent shrinkage of the insole l2 during drying, we provide a plurality of short spaced pins I9 fixed in the plate 2, these pins being, preferably, so short that they do not penetrate the insole. The perforations II also serve somewhat as corrugations and prevent shrinkage so that when the plate 2 is thereafter removed the insole will maintain the intended size and shape.

Fig. 6 illustrates a mold for forming the insoles, the mold parts being designed for use in a press. The upper mold part 20 is formed at its lower portion in the same manner as the last I. Steam pipes 2| are led into the part 20 and the part 20 is adapted to be secured to the press ram 22 in any suitable manner. The lower mold part 23 has an upper surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of the member 20. There is no need for the toe portion l4 or the heel clamp 15. An insole blank 24 may be placed between these parts and formed into the shape illustrated in Fig. 3.

In Fig. 1 a conventional wooden type last 25 is illustrated, this last being adapted to our invention in the same manner exactly as previously described in connection with Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5, the only difference being that the heel clamp I5a is longer and bent at its upper end 26 in order that the peg hole 21, always provided, may be used to receive a peg 28 thus retaining the plate 2a in compressing position against the insole 5a, the plate 2a being constructed exactly similar to the plate 2 and the insole 5a being exactly similar to the insole 5.

While we have described the formation of an insole it is clear that the description applies equally to the formation of soles for various methods of manufacturing and various adaptations will suggest themselves to those skilled in the art so that we desire to be extended protection Within the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a toe cap for engagement with the toe of said last as an endwise positioning mean therewith.

2. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a toe cap for engagement with the toe of said last as an endwise positioning means therewith and means for locking said plate and said last in engaged position.

3. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a toe cap for engagement with the toe of said last as an endwise positioning means therewith and means for locking said plate and said last in engaged position, said means comprising a clamp pivotally connected to the rear end of said plate and engageable with the rear end of said last.

4. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last including the longitudinal arch thereof, the bottom of said last and said plate comprising a mold, said plate having a multiplicity of openings therethrough whereby the moisture of a wet insole compressed therebetween may escape.

5. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having a top surface in counterpart of the bottom of said last including the longitudinal arch thereof, said last being hollow and having openings for the introduction of a heated fluid, said last and said plate comprising a mold for the formation of an insole directly on said last.

6. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said last and said plate constituting a mold for forming an insole, and means associated with said plate and said last for retaining said insole against shrinkage during drying thereof.

'7. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a flange arising from one longitudinal edge thereof, the inside surface of said flange being formed substantially in counterpart of the longitudinal arch of said last, said plate having a plurality of perforations therethrough.

8. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a flange arising from one longitudinal edge thereof, the inside surface of said flange being formed substantially in counterpart of the inner longitudinal arch of said last, said plate having a plurality of perforations therethrough, a toe cap arising from the front edge of said plate and a heel clamp secured to the rear edge of said plate and engageable with a hole in the rear of said last.

9. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a flange arising from one longitudinal edge thereof substantially in counterpart of the longitudinal arch of said last, said plate having flanges arising from the other longitudinal edge of said last at a region immediately adjacent the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone of a foot.

10. The combination of a shoe last and a plate having its top surface formed substantially in counterpart of the bottom of said last, said plate having a flange arising from one longitudinal edge thereof substantially in counterpart of the inner longitudinal arch of said last, said plate having flanges arising from the outer longitudinal edge of said last to provide a scallop around the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone of a foot, said last being formed on curves adjacent the flanges arising from said other longitudinal edge.

11. A last for shoes having a longitudinal arch portion, the side of the last opposite the longitudinal arch portion being curved into the bottom of said last, forming recesses one fore and one aft of that portion of the last corresponding to the position of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone.

12. A last for shoes having a longitudinal arch portion, the side of the last opposite the 10 longitudinal arch portion being curved into the bottom of said last, forming recesses one fore and one aft of that portion of the last corresponding to the position of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone, the said recesses being 15 curved upwardly and also longitudinally of said last and gradually decreasing their depth toward the outer edges thereof.

13. A last for shoes having an outside arch portion rounded into two adjacent recesses which extend upwardly of the side walls and inwardly of the sole portion of said last a comparatively short distance, and which merge substantially along the base line, one of said recesses extending forwardly of said arch portion, the other extending rearwardly thereof whereby to accommodate insole flanges adapted to reside one fore and the other aft of the tuberosity of the fifth metatarsal bone.

NATHAN HACK. DAVID R. BRADY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5714098 *Dec 20, 1995Feb 3, 1998Nike, Inc.Footwear fitting method
US5729918 *Oct 8, 1996Mar 24, 1998Nike, Inc.Method of lasting an article of footwear and footwear made thereby
US5879725 *Sep 9, 1997Mar 9, 1999Nike, Inc.Footwear fitting system
US8590175Nov 6, 2009Nov 26, 2013Nike, Inc.Footwear products, methods for making footwear products, and structures used in making footwear products
EP2409590A1 *Jun 3, 2005Jan 25, 2012Nike International, Ltd.Footwear products, methods for making footwear products, and structures used in making footwear products
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/21, 12/103, 12/133.00R, 12/146.00M
International ClassificationA43D3/00, A43D39/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43D3/00, A43D39/00
European ClassificationA43D3/00, A43D39/00