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Publication numberUS2175175 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1939
Filing dateFeb 6, 1937
Priority dateFeb 6, 1937
Publication numberUS 2175175 A, US 2175175A, US-A-2175175, US2175175 A, US2175175A
InventorsBretholtz Nathan
Original AssigneeBretholtz Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Grading machine
US 2175175 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N.A BRE'rHoL-rz 2,3 75,1?5

GRADING MACHINE Filed Feb. 6, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet l I' UWW Oct. l0, 1939.

Wma.. ATTORNEY aNvENToVR @et lo, i939.

N. BRETHOLTZ Y GRADING MACHINE FilQd' Feb. f5, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 HNVENTOR ATTORNEY (hetL7 l()9 1939c BRETHOIJZ' GRADING MACHINE Filed Feb. e, 193W 5 sheets-sheet 5 Y INVENToR 97. BY M ATTORNEY Oct:a 10 9 E932?Q N. BRE-rHoLTz d 2,175,175

' GRADING MACHINE y Filed Feb. 6, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 ATTORNEY Oct, 10, 1939; N BRETHQLTZ 2,175,175 A GRADIG MACHINE 'led Feb. 6, 1937 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 www@ WWW

ATTORNEY VPatented Qct. 10, 1939 PATENT OFFICE GRADING MACHINE Nathan Bretholtz, Worcester, Mass., assigner to Bretholtz Manufacturing Company, Worcester, Mass., a corporation of Massachusetts Application February 6, 1937, Serial No. 124,391

25 Claims.

This invention relates to leather grading machines, and more especially to a modied form of the grading machine which I show in my application ior patent, Serial lNo.-` 714,834, iiled March 9, 1934.

In the specification of theYabove-entitledrapplication, I-point out the desirability of edge grading leather blanks, such as soles, and I point out how accurate and practical edge grading may be m obtainedthrough my contribution to the art. In the form of my invention described in the said application, I utilize spring pressed moving measuring arms which carry grading rolls which are maintained on the edge of a moving blank through the coactionr of a guide rfoot on each arm with the edge of the blank being graded.

The measuring rolls shown in the said application are of a swiveling type, preferably in the ferm of casters, and are thus able to follow with ease the contour of the blankV being graded. It is mainly through the contribution of swiveling measuring rolls, which are preferably of a caster type, that I am able to obtain the results set forth in the said application. Also, it is mainly in this construction that my contribution to the art, such as evidenced by the Denne patent, No. 1,651,588, resides.

While the invention set forth in the said application supra operates satisfactorily and produces eminently fine results, I iind' now that I can obtain Very ine results also through the use of a simpler mechanism for following the edge contour of a blank to be graded. As already indicated,

in my prior application and inv such prior art patents as that to Denne, springs. are provided to exert a constant force on each of two measuring arms tending to position the measuring rolls carried by said arms inwardly of the blank to be measured-or graded. This movement is limited in accordance with the contour ofthe blank by a guide foot or a guide roll, as is the case in Denne, which rides against the edge of the blank and locates the measuring roll on the edge of the blank. n

In the case of the construction shown in my said application, the springs acting' on the measuring arms neednot be' very powerful because the measuring rolls are of a caster type, and very little friction is developed between the rolls and the leather soles because the rolls swivel automatically to a proper angle to` reduce friction.

The rolls thus follow the edge contour of a blank sole withi ease.

In the case'of Denne, the rolls are xed against 5'5`A rotation relatively to the' measuring arms with which the rolls follow the contour of the blank being measured. In a construction of that type, since the friction between a measuring roll and the leather it contacts i's relatively great, a relatively heavy spring is requiredto keep the limiting roll! or guide foot againstvthe edge of the blank' to follow changes of contour.

Where blanks such as soles are graded, and especially soles having sharp changes in contour, the inertia of the measuring arms will generally be such that'when the contour of the sole suddeniy changes, the measuring rolls carried by the arms will tend toi ride @if the sole. In order to overcome this inertia of the arms, and in order to provide the force necessary to move the arms and their rolls laterally relatively to the sole against the 'considerable friction present, it will be readily understood that extremely heavy vsprings are required. Aiurther' extreme condition also exists which requires an even heavier spring; that is where soles are of a wedge typey inclining upward frein their edges. I-Iere a' xed roll will have to bernoved'r up a steep incline at the wrong angle to that incline;

'Where a sufficiently heavy spring is usedfto insure the measuring rolls following the sole contour, overcoming both arm inertia, friction, and wedge inclines, a further problem arises in connection with the buckling of the sole at its edge when the sole contour` changes in a reverse direction, requiringv the outward movement of the measuring roll'and the guide foot or guide roll. Where the springV is sufficiently heavy to cause the guide foot or contour following roll to actually follow the contour Von inward swings,fthen on the outward swing the force of this spring must be overcome as well as the friction between the measuring roll and theY leather. The force required is so great that unless a very heavy so-le is beingvgraded, thenleather does not have suflicient stiffness to exert the required force, and thus willV buckle under the' strain.

It will therefore be quite readily seen that the problem of edge grading, using simply a measuring arm and a roll not of the caster type, is not an easy one to solve. However, I have conceived and developed a grading machine whereby I am able to grade leather blanks suchv as so-les having sharp contour changes,` using a` non-swiveling andD non-caster roll while avoiding any of the defects of the prior art constructions.

In general, my invention comprises the mounting of a guiding roll as I call it, at such'an angle relatively to al moving blank that theV blank will exert a force on the' roll suiiicient to move the elfi roll inwardly relatively to the blank. Where the roll is carried by a measuring arm of the type shown in Denne, or in my application supra, it is quite obvious that the roll will exert a force on vthe arm and will move the arm in the same manner as though the arm were actuated by a spring. It will be readily appreciated that by adjusting the angle of the roll relatively to the moving sole, either through the particular mounting of the roll on a measuring arm or through the particular mounting of the measuring arm itself, the force exerted by the sole on the roll may be varied within desired limits. It will also be appreciated that if desired, the guiding roll on which the sole acts may serve as a measuring roll as well as a guiding roll.

As a modified form of the invention, I use a pair of rolls mounted in juxtaposed relation, one being the guiding roll, while the other is the measuring roll. I prefer to mount the measuring roll so that it also occupies an angular position relatively to the travel of the moving blank or sole. In this way, both the measuring roll and the guiding roll are capable of better action in the case of soles which are inclined to be thicker just away from their edge and relatively thin at their very edge. The angular relation of the rolls relatively to such a sole causes the rolls to ride up the edge inclines, and thus gives a much better action than would otherwise be possible. It should, of course, be understood that the measuring roll may be placed in any desired angular position without affecting the operation of the guiding roll.

In my invention, I utilize a guide foot which limits the swinging movement imparted to the measuring arm by the guide roll. As a further feature of my invention, I use a rather unusual form of guide foot which conforms to the contour of a base roll over which the blank or sole passes.

Various other detailed features of the construction of my grading machine will be described with reference to the drawings in which two preferred forms of my invention are shown, and such detailed constructions will be set forth in the claims also. Many of the mechanisms which I utilize in the forms of my invention shown in this application, are of the same general class as that shown in my application supra, and will not be described in detail here nor claimed here.

For a detailed description of my invention, I shall now refer to the drawings in which Fig, 1 is an elevation and partial section through a machine incorporating my invention. Fig. 2 is a plan View of the machine construction shown in Fig. l. Fig. 3 is a section along lines 3 3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is an elevation and partial section of my machine along the lines 4--4 of Fig. 1. Fig. 5 illustrates the relation of my guide foot and my guiding roll relatively to a sole in several positions of the sole. Figs. 6 and 7 are respectively side and front elevations of a modification of my invention. Fig. 8 is a cross section along lines 8--8 of Fig. 6.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings, and especially to Figs. 1 and 2, it will be noted that a pair of main plates I0 and II support a series of shafts and cross frame members including bars I2 and I3. Shafts I4, I5 and I6 supported by plates I0 and II are continuously driven at related speeds by chains II and I8 through sprockets secured to the ends of the shafts I4, I5 and I6. The sprockets are carried by thimbles I9, 20, 2| and 22, which are pinned to the shafts I4, I5 and I6, as is apparent.

Split driving rolls 23 and 24 are secured for movement integral with the shaft I4, and are equipped with ratchet teeth to better impart movement to a sole moving over the said rolls. Similarly, split rolls 25 and 25 are secured to the shaft I5, While split rolls 21 and 28 are secured to the shaft I6. The rolls 2'I and 28 are ratcheted in a manner similar to rolls 23 and 24.

A pair of identical sprockets 29 are secured to each of the shafts I4, I5 and I6 in the space between the pairs of split rolls on each of the said shafts, as is probably best shown in Figs. l and 2. A chain 30 is mounted on the three sprockets 29 carried on one side of the longitudinal central line of the three shafts I4, I5 and I6. An identical chain 30 is carried by the three sprockets 29 on the other side of the central line of the three shafts. In order to assist in moving a sole through the machine, each of the chains 3D is equipped with a series of prongs 3I. These prongs naturally cooperate with the leather of the soles in somewhat the same manner as the ratchet teeth of the rolls 23, 24, 2l' and 28.

At the front end of the machine (left side in Fig. 1), a pair of split rolls 32 and 33 are carried b y a shaft 34 supported on lever arms 35 pivoted to the main plates ID and II on shafts 36 and 3l. Through springs 38, the rolls 32 and 33 are maintained in idling and pressing relation to a sole passing through the machine, the pressure on the sole being effective to maintain it in rm contact with the driving rolls 23 and 24. A similar pair of idling pressure rolls 39 and 48 are carried by a shaft 4I and are maintained in pressing relation to driving rolls 2'! and 28 through a pair of springs 42, acting similarly to the pair of springs 38.

`Supported on main plates IU and I I are upper and lower cross bar members I3 and rearward upper and lower cross bar members I2. A presser plate 43 is secured to a pair of rods 44, which rods traverse aligned bores 45 in the cross bar members I2 and I3. Springs 46 are maintained on rods 44 under compression between the upper and lower cross bar members I2 and the upper and lower cross bar members I3, and cooperate with nuts 4l threaded on each of the rods 44, thus urging the rods 44 downwardly. Naturally, the presser plate 43 will also be urged downwardly and into pressing relation to a sole being carried through the machine by the chains 30 and the series of rolls 23-28. f`

From the construction described up to this point, it will be readily seen that once a sole is placed between the idling rolls 32, 33 and the ratchet driving rolls 23, 24, it will be urged through the machine by the cooperation of the remaining driving rolls, the driving chains 30, the prongs 3|, and the presser plate 43.

In order to properly center the soles relatively to the machine, I employ an apparatusdescribed in detail and claimed in my application supra. I do not intend to describe the operation of this centering mechanism with regard to the present invention, since naturally, it may be added to this machine without any difficulty. Also, if desired,

the soles or blanks may be centered manually,

naturally 'be spaced on the bar 5|):in accordance with .the requirements. of .the remainder of` my apparatus, as will be indicated below. For convenience, only one of the measuring arms 54. will be described, since it is understood that. the two measuring arms are of course identical,l -even though. they yoperate oppositely to one another, as isv understood by those skilled in thisA art.

Pivoted at 55 to the measuring arm 54 shown in Fig. his a measuring lever. 56 which has secured at its extremei right' end a cup member 51 formed internally, as shown at 58, for coopration with the ball endf59 ofa pin 60. A cup 68a covers part of pin 60 and the cup member 51. The pin 60 is in turn pivoted` at 6| to a lever 62 secured to. the shaft 63, which carries a thickness indicator'64 cooperable with a scale 64a.

Pinned to the shaft .63, as is probably` best shown in Fig; 2 at 64 and 65, are a pair of ratchet levers. 66 and 61, the indicator 64 being preferably an integral portion of lever 66. A spring 6.8 secured to the lever 61 tends to rotate the lever and through it the shaft 63, so as to'maintain the ball end 89 of the pin 68 within.- the hollow portion 58 of the cup 51. In this way, the indicator 541s made to follow the downward movement of cup 58 incidental to increased thickness of a blank or sole being graded. v i The end of the ratchet lever 61Y is formed wit a series of ratchet teeth 69 cooperating with a pawl 16 pivoted at 1| and controlledfby a lever 12 in a manner to be described presently, and for a purpose which will also be indicated presently. On the other hand, the ratchet lever 66 is lformed at its extreme end witha series of teethv13cooperating with a ratchet 14 pivoted at 15 and controlled by a rod 16, for a purpose and ina manner to be explained presently.

, The measuring arm 54 has at its forward end' a pair of ears 11 traversed by a threaded rod 18 to which are-secured a pair of nuts 19 actuated by a compression spring 86 conned between the upper ear 11 and said nuts 19. Naturally, this spring. 88 will urge thev rod 18 downwardly. #At

its upper end, the rod 18 is pivoted at 8|v to the measuring lever 56, so that 'the 'spring' 80 therefore tends always to urge the lever 56 in a direction forcing the indicator 64V to a position indicating Zero thickness of a sole being measured.l

Aroll 82 is mounted on the shaft 83 carriedY on the lower Vend of the rod 18, and this roll is adapted to contact a leather sole passing through the machine. Naturally, this roll 82 will move rod 18 upwardly against spring 88 as the soles which it contacts increase in thickness. Y

This roll 82, inthe modification shown in` Fig. l, has two functions, and I shall now describe one function, whichis that of 'indicating thickness.

It will be obvious that a sole passing through the Vmachine will move. the roll 82 upwardly and downwardly together with the rod 18 as the thickness of the leather varies. Naturally, upward movement of the rod 18 will cause rotation of the indicating shaft 63 so as to move the indicator 54 into a position relatively to the dial 84a indicating a particular thickness. The movement in a thickness indicating direction'will, of course, be under the iniiuence of spring 68, which rotates the shaft 63 to follow through rod 60 the movement of the measuring lever 56 and its cup 51. Movement in an opposite direction is through the force oi spring following the thickness of the sole through rod 18 and roll 82. Naturally, the spring 80 is so much stronger than the spring 68 that the spring 68 is overcome and eating direction when the sole becomes thinner.

.Before proceeding to describe the second function of the roll 82 carried by each of the measuring arms 54', I should like to describe a complete measuring cycle of the machine. While doing so, I shall Vdescribe also the parts for controlling the rods 12 and 16 which in turn control pawls 10 and 141 A sole rst enters'the machine. when the parts are in the position of Fig. .1.- The relation of the sole (identified by the letterV S) lto 4the measuring rolls 82 is best shown in Fig. 5. The rolls 82 through the arms 54 are maintained in the initial position of Figs. 4 and 5 relatively to a sole entering the machine, through the operation of the springs 84 connected at 85 to the arms 54 and urging the said arms vagainst adjustable stops 86.

Before thesole strikes rolls 82, it first depresses a lever 81secured to shaft 88 and lying centrally between the two chains 39 and in a cut-out portion 43a of presser plate 43. The .lever .81 is normally maintained in its position of Fig.f1 by a lever 89 secured also to the .shaft 88 and spring pressed by spring 98`into the position of.k Fig. .1 against astop 9|.

.The rod'12 already described is pivoted at192 to the lever 93 integral with lever 89 secured to the shaft 8B. In the position of the'parts in Fig. l, the rod 12 is. thus maintained by the springf90 in a position holding the pawl 18 in the teeth 69 of. the ratchet lever 61, In thisposition, the ratchet SUT' lever.61, and therefore the shaft 63,. are held:

againstA movementv into a zero Athickness indi.. eating position. As a matter of fact, the indicator 64 points to four irons .las the thickness indication it-last made. Naturally, the depression of lever 81' by a moving sole will rotate shaft 88 clockwise in Fig. l, thus operating through levers 93 and `12 to move pawl 10 out of teeth 69. `This allows the rod 1 8 carrying roll 82 to move under the influence of spring 80,. and moves the indi:

cator. 64 into a zero position against the Aforce of..

spring 68. This places the'machineain alposition.`

tofmeasurev a new sole and start a measuring cycle. The entering sole now contacts Athe rolls 82 and moves the rolls upwardly in accordance with itsthickness, andthe said thickness is immediately indicated by the indicator 64.

The thicknessl of the heel portion of the soleopposite the line H of the sole. (At this point,

the forward end of the sole will have contacted a further controlling. lever `94 mounted in thel same relation to chains 38 and presser plate 43 as` is the lever 81.. The lever 94 is fixed to a shaft 95 which is spring pressed by a spring 96 so as to maintain the lever 84 inits position oi'Fig. l,vr While also -mainta'ining the rod 16 in its positionl of Fig. 1', it being noted that in this position, the

rod 16 holds the pawl-14 away from the ratchet teeth 13 ofthe ratchet lever 66.

This holding is against the force of spring 91, which is weaker than spring 96, ofcourse. Therefore, the pawl 14 will be maintained in the ratchet teeth 13 when the rod 16 is depressed. The rodV 16 will be depresesd when the lever 94 is depressed' The depression ofby contact with the sole. lever,` 94 will therefore cause the locking of the indicator shaft 63 and indicator 64l against move- 751 Thereafter, should the sole show a greater thickness by moving the roll 82 upwardly against the force of spring 88, the cup 5l will merely leave the ball end 59 of the pin` 60, spring 68 being ineffective to rotate the shaft 63 because of the holding action of the pawl 14 through its cooperation with teeth 13.

yThe sole continues its movement through the machine, and of course, it is understood that the indicator 64 will be able to move in a direction indicating less thickness, but will be unable to move into a position indicating greater thickness. It now appears quite apparent that if the sole were allowed to pass entirely through the machine and away from under rolls 82, the rolls 82 andthe indicator 64 would be moved to Zero indicating position under the influence of springs 89. However, before the sole passes from under the rolls 82, it releases the lever 8l, allowing the relatively powerful spring S8 to move the pawl 'l0 into cooperation with teeth 69' of the ratchet lever 81, which immediately locks the indicating hand 64 against movement to a position indicating less thickness of the sole. y

Incidentally, this position of the indicator will be maintained after the graded sole leaves the machine and until the following sole once again depresses lever 81, as will be appreciated by those skilled in the art. Also, when the sole passes from under the lever 94, it allows the relatively powerful spring .96 to release the pawl 'I4 from the ratchet-teeth 13, and this releases the indicator B4 for movement to a position of greater thickl ness under the iniiuence of the next sole to pass through the machine.

While the operation of the machine just described is of the same general nature as the machine described in my application supra, yet many different parts are used and those parts are arranged to contribute better action and to allow for greater compactness of the machine. I shall now describe the second function of the rolls 82, which function has alreadybeen'referred to. The

rolls 82, in addition to being grading or thickness measuring rolls, have the further function of contributing a side movement to the measuring arms 54, so that the rolls 82 will` follow the edge contour of the blank to be measured or graded for thickness.

As was indicated in my application supra, edge grading is exceedingly important, since leather soles are sold according to their thickness, and it is the point of minimum thickness along the edge which is of exceeding importance. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the vsoles of shoes must be of uniform thickness around the edge, and that unless the soles are graded according to their edge thickness, many difficulties will arlse.

In my edge grading machine described in my application supra, and in the edge grading machine of Denne, springs maintain the two measuring arms pressed in a direction, under the control of guide feet, so that the grading rolls ride along the edge of the blank or sole being graded. As I have alrealy indicated, my original application discloses a fine operating machine which has proven a great success. I have already indicated the defects inherent in a simple machine of the Denne type. I shall now show how in my new machine, I maintain the grading rolls in a position along the edge contour of the blank or sole to be graded.

Looking especially at Fig. 4, it will be noticed ment in a direction indicating greater thickness.

that my rolls 82 are-.set at anangle relatively to the direction of movement of a sole into the machine. In Fig. 5, the angular 'relation of the rolls 82 relatively to the sole S in the various positions ofthe sole in the machine is also quite well illustrated` diagrammatically, but not with extreme accuracy. Naturally, with the rolls 82 maintained at an angle relatively to the moving sole, the moving sole will exert a force against the rolls 82, urging them toward the center of the moving sole S. This movement will, of course, be controlled by a guide extension 91 which Vextends downwardly s from each measuring arm 54 into an arcuately formed foot 98 conforming to the rolls 25` and 26. It will be quite readily understood that a sole passing through the machine will lirst strike the two rolls 82 as shown in Fig. 5, and that thereafter, the guide feet 98 will serve to position the rolls 82 with substantially their central portions on the edge of the sole. The arcuate shape of the guide feet 98 is of extreme importance, as will be appreciated and is here emphasized.

The springs 84 which maintain thel two arms 54 in their initial position of Fig. 4 are, of course, exceedingly weak, and in themselves would be incapable of keeping the guide feet 98 in contact with the peripheral edge of a sole being graded. The function of the springs ismerely to place the arms 54 in the initial position illustrated in Figs. 2, 4 and 5, so that the rolls 82 may be ready for coaction with a sole entering the machine. Thereafter, it is the rolls 82 which keep the guide feet 98 against the sole, so `that the rolls may measure or grade the edge of the sole.

It willv also be appreciated that the only force that'the feet 98 have to overcome in swinging the arms outwardly is the friction between the rolls 82 and the sole tending to move the rolls 82 centrallyof the sole. No powerful arm swinging springs are present to'be overcome, as in the prior art. The advantages of thisrelation of the' parts have been explained already, and will now appear more clear.

The angular position of the rolls 82 relatively to the lsole travel is maintained by fixing the shaft 'I8 on which each roll 82 is mounted against rotation relatively to its particular arm 54. It will also be appreciated, of course, that the measuring arms 54 may be mounted on pivot shafts 5l, spaced somewhat differently from the spacing of the pivot-shafts 5l shown in my application, so that the angle-between the rolls 82 and the sole passing through the machine will be maintained because of this spacing, rather than because of the angularity of the rolls relatively to the arms themselves.` Naturally, it is quite possible to vary the form of my invention in many ways while utilizing the basic ,principle of the angular rolls receiving movement from the moving sole. This should be borne in mind in considering the scope of the monopoly I claim.

As a further modification of my invention, I utilize a pair of rolls on each arm 54, one of the rolls having the same function as the roll 82 in Fig. e, in so farl as controlling the movement of arm 54 is concerned. The other roll is used only for grading or measuring the sole. By using two rolls instead of one, I am able to have a relatively heavy spring operating the moving or guiding roll, while the grading roll may be operated with a much lighter spring, as will of course be appreciated, it having no function other than grading.

This modication of my invention is illustrated in Figs. 6, '7 and 8. There it will be noticed that the arm 54 also has the ears 'l1 in which is guided a shaft |08 and a concentric hollow threaded shaft IDI. The hollow threaded shaft has secured thereon a pair of interlocking nuts |02 which cooperate with a spring |03 abutting the upper ear thus acting to press the shaft downwardly. At its lower end, it has secured a roll |04, which is the moving or guiding roll and which operates in a manner identical to the roll 82 of the modification of Fig.- l, in that it tends always to move the arm 54 to a central portion of a blank being graded. A guide foot S8 of the same form as that illustrated in Fig. 1 limits this movement through engagement with the edge of the sole being graded. The solid rod Ill traversing theA hollow rod lill extends upwardly through the ear i1 and is secured by pivot 8| to a measuring lever 56, in the same manner as the rod 18 is secured to the measuring lever 5E in the modification of Fig. 1.

The rod |00 extends downwardly and has secured at its lower end through a shaft m5, a grading roll H36 which operates to grade a sole in much the same manner as the roll 82 of the modication of Fig. l.

The angularrelation of the rolls |04 and la is probably best illustrated in Fig. 8, and I prefer. to maintain this relationship. However, it is .not entirely necessary that the roll H16 be mounted atan angle relatively to a moving sole..

It is best, however, that this be done, since it lessens the frictional resistance to the movement `of the roll |96, especially where leather vsoles are measured which incline upwardly from their edge.

For maintaining the roll |06 in contact with the sole being graded, I use a relatively light spring |91, thus obtaining quite adesirable result, as will be readily appreciated.

Having now described two modications of my invention, I should like to point out that I consider my contribution to the art to be quite broad, and of exceeding importance, and I do not wish to be limited in the monopoly to be granted me, except as may be required by the state of the art.

I claim: V

1. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm'for movement, and means for moving said arm in response to the changing contour of a moving blank to-be measured comprising an element in contact with the blank and tending through said contact to [move said arm inwardly of the blank and a second element in contact with the periphery of the blank limiting said inward movement in accordance with. the contour of the blank.

2. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm7 means mounting said arm for swinging movement, and means for swinging said arm in response to the changing contour of a moving blank to be measured comprising an element in contact with the surface oi the blank and tending through said contact to swing said arm inwardly oi the blank and a second element incontact with the periphery of the blank limiting said swinging movement in accordance with the contour of the blank.

3. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, and means movable with said measuring arm and maintained in contact with a moving blank to be measured and actuated by said contact with the blank for swinging said arm in each of opposite directions inaccordance with changes in the contour of the moving blank.

In a machine of the class described, a measing movement, a roll carried by said swinging arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, a shaft on which said roll is mounted ata predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank, the Contact of said moving blank relatively to the roll tending to swing the arm inwardly of the blank.

5. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a roll carried by said swinging arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank, the contact of said blank relatively to the roll tending to swing 'the arm inwardly of the blank, and a guide foot in contact with the blank periphery for limiting this inward swinging movement in accordance 'with the blank contour.

6. In a machine of the class described, a measurng arm, means mountingv said arm for swinging movement, a roll carried by said swinging arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movef 'ment of said blank, the contact of 'said blank relatively tothe roll tending to swing the arm inwardly ofthe blank,` the said angle being such that the rate of inward swing contributed by said roll will be greater than any curvature of said blank, whereby said roll will not roll off the blank upon a sharp change inits contour, and a guide foot in contact with the blank periphery for limiting the said inward swinging movementv contributed by said roll in accordance with the edge contour of the blank.

7. In a machine ofthe class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a roll carried by'said swinging arm for Contact with a moving blank to be measured, means securing said roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank, the contact of said blank relatively to the roll tending to swing the arm inwardly of the blank, ajguide footv in Contactv with the blank periphery'for limiting this inward swinging movement vin accordance with the blank contour, means mounting said roll-for vertical measuring movement relatively to said swinging arm lin accordance with changes in the thickness of the said blank contacted by said roll, andindicating mechanism actuated by said roll as it moves in accordance with changes inthe thickness of said blank.

8. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a roil carried by said swinging arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said' roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said Ablank yso that the` contact of the moving blank relatively to the roll will tend to swing the roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank.

9. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a roll carried by said swinging arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank so that the contact of v-the moving blank relatively to the roll will tend to swing the roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank, and a guide foot in contact with uring arm, means mounting said arm for swingthe blank periphery for limiting the inward swinging movement in accordance with the blank contour.

10. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a measuring roll mounted for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at such an angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank that contact of the roll with the blank will tend to swing said roll and arm inwardly of the blank, and means for limiting the said inward swinging movement to an extent whereby lul said roll remains always in a predetermined relation to the edge of the blank to be measured.

11. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement about a fixed axis, a measuring roll mounted for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by la moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at such a position relatively to the said xed axis of said arm and at such an angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank that contact of the roll with the blank will tend to swing said roll and arm inwardly of the blank, and means for limiting the said inward swinging movement to an extent whereby said roll remains always in a predetermined relation to the edge of the blank to be measured.

12. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, means for swinging said arm in response to the changing contour of a moving blank to be measured comprising an element in contact with the blank and tending through said contact to swing said arm inwardly of the blank and a second element in contact with the periphery of the blank limiting said swinging movement in accordance with the contour of the blank, a measuring element carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said moving blank, said arm swinging means cooperating to maintain the said measuring element in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank.

13. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for movement, means movable with said measuring arm and maintained in contact with a moving blank to be measured and actuated through said contact with the blank for moving said arm in opposite directions in accordance with changes in the contour of the said moving blank, a measuring element carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said movingrblank, said arm moving means cooperating to maintain the said measuring element in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank.

14. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for movement, a roll carried by said arm for contact with a moving blank to be measured, means mounting said roll at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of said blank so that the contact of the moving blank relatively to the roll will tend to move the roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank, a measuring element carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said moving blank, said arm moving means cooperating to maintain the said measuring element in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank.

15. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, arm swinging means including a guide roll carried by said swinging arm for Contact with a moving blank to be measured, said guide roll being mounted at a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement oi said blank so that the contact of the moving blank relatively to the roll will tend to swing the roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank, a measuring roll carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said moving blank, said arm swinging means maintaining the said measuring roll in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank, the said measuring roll being mounted at the same angle as said guide roll.

16. In a machine of the class described, a

measuring arm, means mounting said arm for rection of movement of said blank so that the contact of the moving blank relatively to the roll will tend to swing the roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank, a guide foot in contact with the blank periphery for limiting the inward swinging movement in accordance with the blank contour, a measuring roll carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said moving blank, said guide roll and guide foot cooperating to maintain the said measuring roll in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank.

17. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, a guide roll carried by said swinging arm for contact with the relatively i'lat surface of a moving blank to be measured, a spring of relatively great strength urging said guide roll against the surface of said moving blank, means securing said guide roll at a pre- 'tend to swing said guide roll and its arm inwardly of the moving blank, a guide foot for limiting said swinging movement in accordance with the blank contour, a measuring roll carried by said arm for vertical measuring movement relatively to said arm and adapted to receive measuring movement when contacted by said moving blank, a relatively weak spring urging said measuring roll against said moving blank, said guide roll and guide foot cooperating to maintain the said measuring roll in predetermined relation to the edge of the said blank.

18. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm, means mounting said arm for swinging movement, means for swinging said arm in response to the changing contour of a moving blank to be measured comprising a guide foct in contact with the periphery of the blank, a base roll over which the moving blank passes to be measured, said guide foot being formed to conform substantially to the circumference of the base roll whereby to facilitate its proper contact with the moving blank.

19. In a machine of the class described, measuring elements adapted to move an indicator in accordance with variations in thickness of a moving blank, an indicator located at a point on said machine above the plane of the moving blank, a thinness locking means for locking the indicator against movement in a direction indicating zero thickness, a thickness locking means for locking the indicator against movement in a direction indicating greater thickness, base means over which said blank moves for measurement by said measuring elements, trigger levers protruding between said base means for depression by said moving blank, and means of connection extending transversely and then upwardly from said trigger levers to said thinness and thickness locking means.

20. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm. mounted for pivotal swinging movement on a vertical axis, a pair of vertical shafts mounted on said arm for vertical sliding movement, a roll at the end of each shaft, a spring for each of said shafts pressing said rolls downwardly and against a moving blank to be measured, means whereby one of said shafts is held so that its roll is at such a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of a blank through the machine that its contact with said blank tends to swing said roll, its shaft and said arm, inwardly of the blank, a guide foot extending from said arm and limiting the said swinging movement to an extent maintaining the roll carried by the other shaft directly on the edge of the moving blank, and measuring means actuated by the movement imparted to said last named roll and its shaft through variations in the edge thickness of the blank.

21. In a machine of the class described, a measuring arm mounted for pivotal swinging movement on a vertical axis, a pair of vertical concentric shafts mounted on said arm for vertical sliding movement, a roll at the end of each shaft, a spring for each of said shafts pressing said rolls downwardly and against a moving blank to be measured, means whereby the outer of said concentric shafts is held so that its roll is at such a predetermined angle relatively to the direction of movement of a blank through the machine that its contact with said blank tends to swing said roll, its shaft and said arm, inwardly of the blank, a guide foot extending from said arm and limiting the said swinging movement to an extent maintaining the roll carried by the inner shaft with its vertical center directly on the edge of the moving blank, the said shaft and roll being held at the same angle as the first roll and its shaft, and measuring means actuated by the movement imparted to said last named roll and its shaft through variations in the edge thickness of the blank.

22. Measuring mechanism for following the contour of a blank to be measured, comprising means in contact with the surface of the blank and urged through said contact to a position inwardly of the blank as the measuring mechanism moves relatively to the blank, and means limiting the said movement in accordance with the edge contour of the blank.

23. Measuring mechanism for following the contour of a blank to be measured, comprising a roll in contact with the surface of the blank, the roll being at a predetermined angle relatively to said blank whereby it is urged through contact with said blank to a position inwardly of the blank as the measuring mechanism moves relatively to the blank, and means limiting the said movement in accordance with the edge contour of the blank.

24. In a machine of the class described, a series of shafts, pairs of split driving rolls on each of said shafts leaving a space medially of the longitudinal axis of the machine unoccupied by said rolls, sprockets on the shaft portions in said space, driving chains on said sprockets for assisting said rolls in forcing a blank through said machine, a presser plate overlying the said chains, a slot in the under side of the said presser plate, and controlling trigger levers extending from under said driving rolls into the said slot for actuation by a blank passing through the said machine.

25. In a machine of the class described, measuring elements adapted to move an indicator in accordance with variations in thickness of a moving blank, an indicator located at a point on said machine above the plane of the moving blank, a thinness locking means for locking the indicator against movement in a direction indicating zero thickness, a thickness locking means for locking the indicator against movement in a direction indicating greater thickness, base means over -which said blank moves for measurement by said measuring elements, trigger levers protruding through an opening in said base means fdr depression by said moving blank, and means extending sidewise under said base means from said trigger levers to a position beyond the edge of the blank for actuating said thinness and thickness locking means.

NATHAN BRETHOLTZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4271228 *Feb 4, 1980Jun 2, 1981Hollingsworth & Vose CompanySheet material containing exfoliated vermiculite
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/501.1
International ClassificationC14B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationC14B1/00, C14B2700/28
European ClassificationC14B1/00