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Publication numberUS2175394 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1939
Filing dateJul 18, 1936
Priority dateJul 18, 1936
Publication numberUS 2175394 A, US 2175394A, US-A-2175394, US2175394 A, US2175394A
InventorsFrank B Hewel
Original AssigneeFrank B Hewel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator structure
US 2175394 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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INVENTOR Hum/ Hel/Vd.

/ruaw d? 'WITNESS ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 10, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 4 Claims.

My invention relates to Ventilating and cooling structures and particularly to radiator structures for automobiles and the like.

Olne object of my invention is to provide a 5 simple and inexpensive but particularly effective radiator structure,

Another object of my invention is to provide a structure of this character in which a number of upwardly-extending hollow portions are spaced in pairs by Ventilating portions having protruding parts inclined at an angle to the horizontal, all of the portions being preferably integral or made from a single piece of sheet metal.

A further object of my invention is to provide a radiatorV structure having a number oi tubular portions and an intermediate portion having struck-up parts for directing a stream of fluid between the past said tubular portions.

Another object of my invention is to provide a structure of the character just set forth, including a number of members relatively staggered in position in order to dispose a tubular portion in substantial alinement with a Ventilating portion, thereby providing a particularly effective radiator structure for automobiles and the like.

Another object of my invention is to provide a radiator structure having a number of substantially tear-drop-shaped water-conveying portions and an intermediate Ventilating portion having struck-up parts, whereby an especially eii'lcient cooling and Ventilating structure is provided.

Other objects of my invention will become evident from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Figure l is a partial View in front elevation of an automobile radiator constructed in accordance with my present invention;

, Fig. 2 is a partial View in horizontal section taken along the line II-II of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a Vertical section taken alongthe broken line III- UI oi Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged plan view, with parts broken away, of a portion of the radiator structure shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged View corresponding to a part of the structure shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a View showing my radiator structure after undergoing an intermediate manufacturing 5o process; and.

Fig. '7 is a top plan view of a modiiied form of the structure shown in Fig. 2.

Referring to the drawings, the structure here shown comprises an automobile radiator I, for

example, having the usual upper and lower chambers or manifolds 2 and 3, which may be of any desired or suitable form and which are joined by the familiar or any suitable framework 4, a plurality of Ventilating and cooling members constructed in accordance with my present in- 5 Vention comprising hollow or tubular Water-conveying portions 5 and apertured Ventilating portions 6 included in the area between the upper and lower water chambers 2 and 3 and the frame 4, as is customary. l0

The cooling and Ventilating structure shown in Fig. l is shown in horizontal cross section in Fig.

2 as comprising four members, althoughy any number from one up may be employed, depending upon the desired cooling and Ventilating ca- 15 pacity of the completed radiator. The front member of the row of Ventilating and cooling members is shown near the bottom of Fig. 2 and at the left of Fig. 3 and comprises a base member Illa from which is formed a plurality of spaced hol- 20 low or tubular water-conveying portions Ila., preferably tear-dropor pear-shaped, with an apertured Ventilating portion between each pair of tubular portions comprising a plurality of hollow triangular struck-up parts 12a, the apices of 25 which may be connected together by means of a suitable thin angle member Ma or by a wire soldered thereto or, if desired, such connecting member may be omitted. In Fig. 2, the illustrated top struck-up part |2a is shown as pro- 30 vided with a triangular opening I3a, whereas the other struck-up parts are of similar hollow triangular. shape, as will be noted from Fig. 6, which shows the struck-up parts l2a when the stamping machine has cut them out of the sheet of 35 metal but before they have been bent into the iinal plane and the apex-connecting member, such as Ma, applied.

It will be noted that each of the members shown in Fig. 2, respectively carrying notations 40 such as Illa, lllb, IDC, and Id for the base portions, Ila, Hb, llc, and Ild for the tubular portions, etc., is shown as formed from a single piece of sheet metal. While this is the preferred form, my invention is not necessarily limited thereto. 45

It will be further noted that eicient use is made of the material in that the tubular portions are pearor tear-drop-shaped, so that the air flowing thro-ugh the radiator structure will cover the complete tube with no dead spots or low 5o pressure spots in the air stream. In addition, the struck-up parts 12a, |2b, etc., provide relatively large apertures in the base portions Illa, Ib, etc., to permit air to readily flow through these ventilating portions, and are triangular in shape, their 55 sides extending substantially parallel to the respective confronting sides of the tubular portions.

It will be further noted that the members shown in Fig. 2 are relatively staggered, so that the tubular portion Hb of the second member is substantially in alinement with the struck-up Ventilating portion l2a of the first member, etc.

Furthermore, in order to improve the ventilating and cooling effect, the struck-up parts |2a of the first member are bent downwardly, of the second member upwardly, of the third member downwardly, and of the fourth member upwardly, as clearly shown in Fig. 3, whereby a tortuous but relatively unobstructed path for Ventilating air is provided.

While these struck-up parts l2cn, 12b, etc., thus preferably extend at an acute angle to a plane substantially perpendicular to the axes of the tubular portions, this is not essential, as, if desired, they may extend substantially parallel thereto.

As a result of the illustrated arrangement of parts in my radiator, a relatively emcient structure is provided, from the standpoint of cooling of the liquid, by reason of the tear-drop-shaped tubular portions and the staggered arrangement of parts mentioned above, from the standpoint of ventilation for the reason mentioned in the next to the last paragraph, and from the standpoint of efficient use of the metal by reason of parallelism of adjacent parts and yet relative ruggedness of the individual members. It will be appreciated that the assembly of a radiator of any desired capacity is a relatively simple and inexpensive process, inasmuch as the same parts are employed, the relative positions thereof merely being relatively staggered as mentioned above. Each member is made from sheet metal which may be readily produced by suitable machinery or by hand, and replacement of a damaged section or members is a relatively simple and inexpensive matter also.

Referring now to the modified form of my invention shown in Fig. 7, the illustrated structure comprises a base portion 2U, and a plurality of tear-drop-shaped tubular portions 2| spaced by intervening struck-up parts 22 having the top opening 23 and the connecting ridge 24, if desired, thus corresponding to the general arrangement of the structure shown in the other figures. However, in order to stiffen the junction of the teardrop-shaped portions 2| withthe base portion 20, the parts are formed as follows: A doubled-back portion 25 extends at an oblique angle to the base portion 2U and is then reversed on itself to form the loop of the tubular portion 2|. Another doubled-back portion 26 tightly engages the inner side of the oblique doubled-back `portion 25 and is bent around the same and then into the plane of the base portion 20. In this way again a single piece of sheet metal is employed for the purpose of providing both the Water-conveying tubular portions and the Ventilating struck-up portions, the radiating and Water-containing sections, however, being substantially as eiicient as in the case of the structure shown in the other gures, although, as noted above, the juncture of the teardrop-shaped portions with the base portion is somewhat stiffer.

It will be seen that I have thus provided a relatively simple and inexpensive radiator structure which may be readily expanded to provide any desired capacity, the parts being so arranged that particularly effective cooling and Ventilating is insured.

I do not wish to be restricted to the exact structural details or arrangement of parts herein set forth, as various other modications thereof may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention. I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall be imposed thereon as are indicated in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

l. A radiator structure having a row of members, each member comprising a base portion, a plurality of tubular portions disposed thereon and an intermediate portion having parts struck-up from said base portion, said members being relatively staggered to dispose a tubular portion in substantial alinement with an intermediate portion.

2. A radiator structure having a row of members, each member comprising a base portion, a plurality of substantially tear-drop-shaped tubular portions disposed thereon and an intermediate portion having struck-up parts with their edges extending in planes substantially parallel to the planes of the confronting tear-dropshaped portions, said members being relatively staggered to dispose a tear-drop-shaped portion in substantial alinement with an intermediate portion.

3. A radiator structure comprising a base portion having a plurality of substantially parallel and tear-drop-shaped tubular portions disposed thereon and intermediate portions extending substantially parallel to the axes of said tubular portions and having substantially triangular apertured struck-up parts with their projecting edges extending in planes substantially parallel to the planes of the sides of the confronting tear-dropshaped portions, the apertures in the struck-up parts of any intermediate portion being alined vertically for directing a stream of uid therethrough.

4. A radiator structure having a row of members, each member comprising a base portion, a plurality of tubular portions disposed thereon and an intermediate portion having parts struck-up from said base portion, said members being relatively staggered to dispose a tubular portion in substantial alinement with an intermediate portion, said struck-up parts being provided with apertures, said apertures being alined vertically for directing a stream of fluid therethrough.

FRANK B. HEWEL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559272 *Sep 10, 1948Jul 3, 1951Ungarische Radiatoren FabriksHeat exchanger
US2759247 *Jul 21, 1950Aug 21, 1956Olin MathiesonMethod of making heat exchangers
US3182380 *Jun 25, 1962May 11, 1965Borg WarnerMethod of making a heat exchanger
US5758720 *Nov 26, 1996Jun 2, 1998Behr America, Inc.Unitary heat exchanger core and method of making same
US5870825 *Oct 14, 1997Feb 16, 1999Behr America, Inc.Method of making unitary heat exchanger core
US7063131Jul 12, 2002Jun 20, 2006Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc.Perforated fin heat exchangers and catalytic support
US20130061617 *Sep 13, 2011Mar 14, 2013Honeywell International Inc.Air cycle condenser cold inlet heating using internally finned hot bars
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/148, 29/896.6, 165/DIG.500, 165/166
International ClassificationF28F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/50, F28F1/02
European ClassificationF28F1/02