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Publication numberUS2175549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1939
Filing dateJan 27, 1938
Priority dateJan 27, 1938
Publication numberUS 2175549 A, US 2175549A, US-A-2175549, US2175549 A, US2175549A
InventorsJacobson Harold B, Nardulli Michael J
Original AssigneeAngelo F Napies
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Venetian blind
US 2175549 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.0d- 10, 1939- MJ. NARDULLI Er A1. 29175549 VENETIAN BLIND Filed Jan. 27, 1958 -2 sheets-sheet 1 Oct- 10, 1939- M. J. NARDULL: Er AL VENETIAN BL IND Filed Jan. 27', 1938 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 jnz/efzirs:

mesu oei. 1o, 1939 VENETIANBLIND Michael J. Nardnlli and Harold B: Jacobson, Chicago, Ill.; said Jacobson, assignor, by mesne assignments, of his right to Angelo F. Naples Application January 27, 1938, Serial No. 187,286

A f8 Claims. (Cl. 156-17) The invention relates generally to Venetian blinds.

Venetian blinds as now constructed. embody a mortised and grooved head rail which must be specially formed for each particular width of blind. As a result, the cost of producing the custom made head rails is excessive, and constitutes a major item in the cost ofthe completed blinds. I'he cost is also increased by the fact that the assembly of the blind with the custom built head rail involves numerous cord-threading operations and assembly operations. In addition, conventionally constructed blinds of this type require special dimensioning for each particular width of blind. Because of this special formation of the slats, conventional blinds cannot be economically stocked and re-cut by small shops or stores to nt various sizes of windows. The special or custom built characteristics of the conventional head rail also constitute a material obranged that it may be altered as to width by ordinary shade shop workers through the use of their ordinary tools, whereby the blind is adapted for manufacture in distribution to retail outlets as a stock item of merchandise.

Another object is to provide a new and improved Venetian blind having all of the operational characteristics of conventional blind and constructed in such a manner that both the tilting Aand raislngand lowering functions are performed by a simple simplified element adapted for relatively economical manufacture.

Another object is to provide such a conventionally operable Venetian blind wherein a spring roller mechanism similar to the conventional shade roler performs the tilting yand/or raising and lowering'operations.

Another object is to provide'such a blind wherein all of the parts are adapted for high speed, economical manufacture.

Another object is to provide suche. blind which does not `require special or expensive fittings, and in which the fittings may be properly located and installed by the ordinary householder.

Another object is to provide a blind of this character which may be readily and easily mounted in or removed from its operative position by the housewife. Y

Another object is to provide a Venetian blind construction wherein the blind may readily and easily be raised by manually engaging and raising the toe rail or bottom rail of the blind.

Other objects and advantages will become api parent from the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is an inside elevational view of a Venetian vblind embodying the features of the invention.

ing the slats of the blind in different positions of adjustment.

Fig. 7 is an inside elevational view illustrating an alternative embodiment of the invention wherein the blind may be tilted or raised and lowered as desired.

Fig. 8 is a fragmental enlarged sectional view taken along the line 8 8 of Fig. 7.

Figs. r9 and 10 are reduced views similar to Fig. 8 and showing the blind in different tilted positions. Y

Fig. 11 is a fragmental view of one of the tape supporting grooves of the roller, taken along the line iI-II of Fig. 8.

Fig. 12 is a view showing an alternative manner of forming the grooves on a small diameter roller.

For purposes of disclosure, We have illustrated. in the drawings and will hereinafter describe in` detail the preferred embodiment of the invention, together with two alternative embodiments thereof, with the understanding that we do not intend to limit our invention tothe particular constructions and arrangements shown, it being contemplated that various changes may be made by those skilled in the artwithout departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

In the form chosen for disclosure in Fig. 1 to 6, the invention is embodied in a Venetian blind i0 (Fig. 1) operatively mounted in a window frame I l having side frame members l2 and I3, a top frame member Il and a sill i5.. The blind I0, in the form illustrated comprises a plurality of elongated thin slats I6 of conventional width, thickness, material and finish, normally suspended in uniform vertically spaced relation to each other by means of conventional ladder-tapes I1 which are spaced laterally from each other and are fixed at their upper ends to a tiltable support 2li. At their lower ends the tapes I1 are fixed' to a relatively heavy toe rail 2| in the 4 conventional manner. s

As shown in Figs'. 3 and 4, each ladder-tape i1 is made from flexible woven fabric and comprises an inner band I1 and outer band i1" connected by ladder elements 22' and 22" formed from fabric and adapted to support thelslats I6. The

ladders 22 and 22" are `.relatively narrow, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4, and are located so that the ladders 22 are all located adjacent the left hand side of the tape i1 and alternate with the ladders 22" which are located adjacent to the right hand edge of the tape. Y

In a blind of this character it is desirable t provide for tilting of the sla'ts i6 in either direction from the horizontal or fully open" position of Fig. 3, such tilting being to the inwardly and downwardly sloping Slat-positioning of Fig. 5 (hereinafter termed an inwardly facing position, since the tops of the slats are faced inwardly) or to the 4outwardly and downwardly sloping slat-positioning of Fig. 6 (hereinafter termed an outwardly facing position). Such operation. is provided in the present instance through tilting of the upper tiltable support 20, which, in accordance with the present invention, is of such a character'as to be capable of economical production, adapted for easy alteration to suit installation requirements, and also adapted to be mounted in or removed from its opera-'- tive position in the window frame by the ordinary householder.

To this end the present invention provides for the utilization of a standard or conventionally constructed spring-type shade roller to form the tiltable support 20, and the tapes I1 are so attached to the spring roller that, by shifting or rocking-the roller 2li to different positions, the slats I8 of the blind iii may be shifted between the various positions which are desired.

It is, of course, desirable that the tapes be attached to the roller Ziibysimple and easily applied means, and to this end. we prefer to employ a standard design of metal-covered shade roller which, as illustrated in Fig. 3, has a wood core 3| formed with a longitudinal groove in which there is fixed a lining channel l2 formed from sheet metal. About the core 3i a sheet metal cover 33 is provided, the edges of which are flanged into and interlocked with the channel I2. In the form shown, this channel or slot is positioned so as to face inwardly of the frame i I when the blind is in its open position of Fig. 3. With this construction and positioning of the roller, the upper end of the inner band I1 is forced into the slot formed between the inturned edges of the cover 33, and a spring clip 34 is forced into the slot over the end of the band so as to lock said inner band i1 to the roller. The outer band i1 is then passed over the top of the roller from the other side and is secured, as by pins or staples I5 and 36, to the inner band I1', in such an endwise relationship as to support the slats i6 in their horizontal positions of Fig. 3. Thus, the band i'l" has a. large area of frictional bearing on' the roller so'as to reduce the strain placed on the connection formed by the clip I4.

To support the roller on the frame ii brackets 40 of conventional construction are employed, one bracket being of the type adapted to receive and rotatably support the customary trunnion 4i (Fig. 3) of the roller whilev the other bracket 40 is of the usual type adapted to support the spring-anchoring pin 4l (Fig. 2) in a non-rotatable position. By thus mounting the roller 20, the spring 43 which tends to rotate the roller 20 in one direction may be utilized to rock the roller in said direction, while suitable means may be provided to rock the roller in the opposite direction; and the usual .ratchet and pawl mechanism of the roller may be utilized to latch the roller and the blind in one or more of the various positions of adjustment.

For convenienceI of operation the roller 20 is preferably mounted with the non-rotatable anchoring pin 42 at the right hand side of the window frame, whereby the spring 43 tends to rock the roller in a clockwise direction as indicated by the arrow in Figs. 2 and 3. and flexible manual actuating means is fixed to and wound about the roller in a counterclockwise direction so. as to hang down inside of the blind within convenient reach of the person wishing to actuate the blind from one position to another. Preferably this manual actuating means comprises a bead-chain 45, which is particularly adapted for convenient attachment to the form of roller herein employed. Thus a short length of the bead chain 45 at one of its ends is drawn endwise into the slot in the roller 20, and a spring clip or split clamping band 41 is slipped over this end portion of the chain as shown in Figs. l and 2 to iix it in place. The chain is then passed outwardly under the roller and then about the roller in a counterclockwise direction so as to hang down inside the blind for a substantial distance.

The spring of the roller 20 is a torsion spring of the coil type and is conventionally related to the other parts of the roller, having one end 43' anchored in the wood core of the roller 2l while its other end 43" is iixed to the anchoring pin 42. About the pin 42 immediately adjacent the end 2li of the roller is a projecting colla-r 50 having notches 5| and 52 vformed therein at diametrically opposite points to cooperate with pawls il and B4 pivoted on the end 20' to fix the roller against clockwise rotation by its spring' 4l. For present purposes only one notch is required in the collar lil, this one being the notch Il which is shown at the top of the collar. The lower notch 52 is shown herein merely because it is embodied in the conventional shade roller here employed. 1

In the present embodiment, a two-pawl roller I is illustrated, although other conventional rollers having a .greater number of pawls might be elnployed. 'I'he two pawls of the illustrated roller 2l are disposed at 180 from each other and the pawl i! which is adjacent the slot engages the upper notch Il to fix the blind in its open position of Fig. 3.

When the user wishes to shift the slats ii toward their inwardly facing position of Fig. 5, the ilexible member 4l is pulled downwardly to rotate the roller against the force of the spring 43. If it is desired to fully close the blind, in other words, to move it past the position of Fig. 5, the rotation may be continued until the pawl I4 is in a position to engage the notch 5i For intermediate positions, the bead chain 45 may be engaged with an anchoring notch 55 formed in a plate 86 secured to the frame member I3 as shown in Fig. 1.

The outwardly facing sist-positioning of Flg. 6, or movement beyond the positioning of Fig. 6, may be attained by actuation of the flexible member 4I in a manner similar to that used in rolling up a window shade, and the desired positioning may be maintained either byengagement of the pawl Il with the notch II, or by the use of the anchoring member Il as described in connection with the inwardly facing positioning of the slats.

Since the present blind of Figs. 1 to 7 is intended for economical manufacture and sale, the usual elevating cords are eliminated: and other means is provided to maintain the slats I6 in propervertical alinement. This means is preferably provided at but one end of the slats for the reason that the slats may then be formed in such a manner as to facilitate merchandising of the blind in stock sizes.

The present invention in the form of Figs. l to 6 also contemplates and provides for quick and easy removal of the slats for cleaning purposes. and to this end the preferred form. of alining means, as herein shown, is located at one edge of the blind rather than at the central lateral axis thereof. Thus the slats I6 are provided. with semicircular notches l in their edges as shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the notches i0 being located' adjacent to one end and at equally spaced distances from the end so as to be located midway between the side edges of the right hand tape I1, and concealed thereby. To engage the notches and thus hold the slats in alinement, means is provided which engages the slots 60 of all of the slats, this means extending vertically along one of the bands of the right hand tape I1 in the lateral space between the webs 22' and 22". This means engages the slo'ts il with suiiicient force to maintain alinement of the slats, and yet the slats may readily be disengaged and removed endwise for cleaning. Preferably the slats I6 have notches 60 in both their edges ad# jacent one end so that the slats may be turned over periodically to prevent warping.

In the form herein shown in Figs. 1 to 6 the means engaging the notches I is in the form of a rigid means which will prevent outward buckling of the blind in the event that it is elevated by lifting the toe rail 2|. To this end the alinement means comprises a plurality of. telescoping rods B and i5", arranged with` the rodv of K greatest diameter adjacent the top of the blind. As shown in Fig. 3, clips il are provided at the upper and lower ends of the rods to ilx said ends to the upper and lower ladder webs, thereby to insure proper lengthening and shortening of the rods as the blind is lowered or raised.

Preferably a similar telescopingrod means G1 is provided behind the left hand tape I1, thereby insuring uniform action or stiffness of both sides of. the blind. The means 61 is positioned similarly to the rods 65, but the forward edges of the slats are left straight or unnotched, so as to fa# cilltate re-sizing of stock sizes of the blind.

To support the blind lin a partially elevated position, means is associated with the toe rail 2I to engage opposite sides of the frame Il. This meansin the preferred form shown comprises bendable spring members or arms secured to opposite ends of the toe rail and having rubber engaging elements 1I normally pressed against the frame members I2 and I2. By springing the members 1li away from-the frame, tlie toe rail 2| may be released for the purpose of raising the blind.

To conceal the roller 2l, a suitable facial board is provided, this board preferably being of such a length as to extend slightly over the outer faces of the vertical frame members I2 and I3 as shown in Fig. l. The facial board 15, as herein shown, is held in place by simple and effective means comprislng'a bracket 16 mounted on each of the members I2 and I3 and extending outwardly beneaththe board 1l and then upwardly as at 11 to hold the board firmly against the members I2 and I3.

Since the roller is of standard construction, it will be evident that an ordinary shade shop worker may readily reduce its length in the conventional manner by sawing of! the excess portion of the left hand end thereof, and then repositioning the trunnion 4I in the newly formed end of the roller. `It will also be evident that the left hand ends of the slats may be cut off with the usual tools, and that such modification does not affect the utility of the slats because the slats are o f uniform section from the notches to the left handl end thereof. The reduction in the blind width is then completed merely by shifting of the upper and lower connection of the left hand tape.

' The use of a conventional shade roller in the present device also makes it possible for the ordinary housewife to remove and replace the blind as desired, since it .involves an operationsimilar to the removal and replacement of the ordinary window shades.

In attaining a relatively tight closure of the slats in their inwardly facing position of Fig. 5, the upper pin or clip is important, since it secures this point on the tape I1 to the roller adjacent to the slot, and hence insures suspension of the inner tape I1' from beneath the roller rather than from the inside edge of the roller.

The use of the grooved roller is, of course, advantageous, although not essential,- to the present invention, since it simplifies the initial assembly as well as any future re-adJustment of the parts of the blind.

In Figs. 7 to 11 of the drawings, an alternative form of the invention is illustrated wherein, in addition to the tilting of the slats by the supporting spring roller, provision is made for raising and lowering the blinds through manipulation of the supporting roller. Thus as shown in Fig. '1, this form of the invention comprises a spring roller 80, made from wood, but otherwise similar to the roller 20 of Fig. 1 in form, functioning and positioning, is mounted in brackets in a similar window frame I I. The blind of Fig. '1 has slats 8l supported by laddered tapes l2 similar to the tapes I1 of Fig. l, there being a toe rail 83 similarly secured to the bottoms of the tapes. 'I'he spring members 10 of. Fig. l are, of course, eliminated in the blind of Fig. '7.

The slats 8I of the blind of Fig. 'I are different from those of Fig. l in that they are conventionally slotted as at 84 (Fig. 8) to provide for the passage upwardly therethrough of elevating cords 85. The cords 85 at their lower' ends are attached centrally to the toe rail 83 as indicated at 86.

In accordance with the present invention as embodied in Figs. 7 to 11, each tape l2 has its opposite or inner and outer elements fastened together at their upper ends so as to rest or extend over and about the roller 80, and the frictional engagement of the tapes with the roller is relied upon to effect tilting of the slats when the roller 80 is rocked; and the cords 85 are secured to the roller beneath the tapes 82 so that by continued rotation of the roller, the cords 85 may be Wound about or unwound from the roller in such a manner as to raise or lower the blind.

In order that both the tapes and the cords may be guided and positioned at all times, the roller 80 is preferably rather large in diameter, for example, about 2 inches, and is turned down or grooved as' shown in Figs. 7 and 11 to provide individual guiding grooves'ior both thecord and the tape." In this form an outer groove 81 is. formedof such a width as to receive the tape 82, while an inner and deeper groove 88 is formed centrally of the groove 81 to receive the cord 85.

The end of the cord 85 is of course fixed to the .80 is provided with a ratchet mechanism similar to the rouer 2o of Figs. 1 and 2. Thus the feuer actuating means of Fig. 7 comprises a thin fabric ribbon 90 connected to the roller 80 at the bottom of.a groove 9|, and having a bead chain 92 secured to its lower or loose end. When the blind of Figs. 7 and 8 is in its lowered position. the ribbon 90 i's wound in its groove 8| and its loose end hangs down on the inside of the blind for a suiilcient distance to be within easy reach. Then when the blind is to be raised, the ribbon 90 is pulled downwardly so as to rotate the roller counterclockwise and thus Wind the cords 85 in their grooves 88.

Inv the iirst inward rotational movement of the roller 80, the frictional contact of the tapes 82 in their grooves 81 causes the slats to be tilted inwardly toward and even beyond the position of Fig. 9; and continued rotation of the roller 80 causes the blind to be raised while the slats remain in this inwardly facing position. When the blind has been raised to the desired extent, the ribbon is manipulated in the same general manner as a window shade to cause the dogs of the roller (dogs of the type shown in Fig. 2) to fix the roller 80 in the desired rotational position. In this operation the slats of the blind may b`e tilted back to the horizontal position or any other desired position merely by manipulation of the ribbon 90.

In order to prevent sagging of the tapes into the inner grooves 88, stiffening means may be incorporated in the portions of the tapes which spools 91 which are pinned to the roller 86 asl indicated at 98.

From the foregoing it will be evident that the present blind in both of its embodiments utilizes a simple and inexpensive device for supporting and tilting the blind; that the blind of Figs. 1 to 6 may be supplied in stock sizes, and the slats of the rst embodiment, as well as the roller thereof, may be cut down as required by ordinary shade shop employees. It will also be evident that the elements of both embodiments of the present blind are all adapted for manufacture at a reasonable cost, and that the present blind is therefore adapted for quantity merchandising.

It Ywill also be evident that the blind o! Figs. '1 to 12 accomplishes all of the functions of conventional blinds, and yet is formed in a much more simple and economical manner; it being apparent that the grooving of the roller involves but a simple wood turning operation.

We claim as our invention:

1. In a Venetian blind having a plurality of slats, flexible laddered tapes upon which said slats are supported, the combination of an upper supporting means for said tapes comprising conventionally constructed spring-type roller having said tapes carried by said roller and depending from opposite sides of the roller, and means depending from said roller for actuating the roller in opposition to its spring.

2. In a Venetian blind, the combination oi slats having supporting tapes associated therewith, and means for supporting the upper ends of said tapes comprising a tiltable member having trunnion at one end and a projecting supporting element at theother end, means engaging said supporting element to hold said element non-rotatable, spring means acting between said element and said member totilt said member in one direction, means depending from said member for adjustably tilting said member against the force of said spring in the other direction. and means for holding said member in its adjusted tilted position.

3. A Venetian blind comprising, in combination. a plurality-of slats, supporting tapes associated therewith, means for supporting the upper ends of said tapes comprising a tiltable member to which said tapes are secured to tilt said slats when said member is tilted, said member having a trunnion at one end and a projecting supporting element at the other end, means rotatably supporting said trunnion, .means engaging and supporting said element in a non-rotatable position, spring means acting between said element and said member to tilt said member in one direction toward a closed relationship of said slats, means depending from said member for adjustably tilting said member against the force of said sp1-ing in the other direction toward an open positioning of said slats, and latch means operable between said element and said member to releasably retain said member in the adjusted position wherein said slats are in said open positioning of said slats.

4. In a Venetian blind having a plurality of slats, iiexible laddered tapes upon which said slats are supported, the combination of an upper supportingl means for supporting said tapes comprising a conventionally constructed shade roller hav` ing its spring mechanism and a ratchet and pawl control mechanism located adjacent one end, said tapes being secured to said roller at points spaced longitudinally thereof, and means for actuating the roller in opposition to its spring, said means being located adjacent to said end, and means extending vertically within and, concealed by the tape adjacent to said end for maintaining said slats in alinement, said slats being formed to operatively engage said alining means within said tape and being formed between their points of engagement with said alinement means and their lower ends of said tapes, the combination or an 7| upper supporting means for said tapes comprisformed inone edge and positioned so as to 'be ing a conventionally constructed spring-type shade roller having said tapes operatively secured thereto and depending from opposite sides of the roller, means depending from said roller for actuating said roller in opposition to its spring, and means concealed by said tapes operable to hold said blind against inward or outward buckling when said blind is elevated by manual raising of said toe rail. 4

6. A blind of the character described comprising, in combination, a plurality of slats, flexible laddered tapes uponwhih said slats are supported and by actuation of which said slats may be tilted, a toe rail fixed to the lower ends of said tapes, a shade roller operatively secured to the upper ends of said tapes to tilt said slats.

through actuation of said tapes, ilexible depending means for actuating said roller in opposition to its spring, and means concealed by' one of said tapes operable to retain said slats in alined positions above one another.

7. A blind as deiined in claim 6 wherein said `Ylast mentioned means is supported by said one of said tapes.

8. A blind of the character described comprising, in combination, a plurality of im-peri'orate slats, a plurality of flexible supporting elements for said slats, each comprising an inner tape and an outer tape connected by'ladder webs at vertically spaced intervals, said webs being located at the opposite edges of said tapes alternately and being of such a width as to define a vertically extending clear space bounded on opposite sides by said alternate webs, said slats being supported on said webs, a tiltable upper supporting element to which said tapes are attached, said slats adjacent to one end each having a notch formed in one edge and positioned so as to be located behind the tape at said end, and means extending vertically in engagement with said notches and located in said vertical space between said alternate webs and -adjacent to one of said tapes to hold said slats in the desired longitudinal positions.

9. A Venetian blind comprising, in combination, a plurality of slats, a plurality of exible supporting elements for said slats, each comprising an inner tape and an outer tape connected by ladder webs at vertically spaced intervals, said webs being located alternately adjacent opposite edges of said tapes and being of such a width as to provide a vertically extending space therebetween, said slatsibeing supported on said webs, a tiltable upper supporting element to which said tapes are attached, said slats adjacentto one end having notches formed in one edge and positioned so as to be located behind the tape at said end, a pair of4 telescoping rods extending vertically in engagement with said notches and located in said vertical space between the slats and one of the tapes of said supporting element to hold said slats in the desired longitudinal positions and prevent buckling of said blind when lifted from the bottom.

10. AVenetian blind comprising, in combination, a plurality of slats, a plurality of flexible supporting elements for said slats each comprisf ing an inner tape and an outer tape connected by ladder webs at vertically spaced intervals, said webs being located alternately adjacent opposite edges of said tapes, said slats being supported on said webs, a tiltable upper supporting member to which said tapes are operatively secured, said slats adjacent to one end having notches concealed by one of said supporting elements, and laterally rigid telescoping means extending vertically in engagement with said notches and associated with said one of the supporting elements l ciated therewith, said slats having transverse g slots therein at points located within said tapes, and said tapes having a toe rail located at their lower ends, elevating cords attached to said toe rail and extending upwardly through said slots within the tapes, and a single means for supporting said tapes to tilt said slats and for actuating said cords to elevate the blind.

13. In a Venetian blind, the combination of a plurality of slats having supporting tapes associated therewith, said slats having transverse slots therein at points located within said tapes,

and said' tapes having a toe rail located at theirs 30 lower ends, elevating cords attached to said toe rail and extending upwardly through said slots within the tapes and a ratchet controlled spring roller, said tapes having loops at their upper ends through which said roller extends to support the blind. said elevating cords being attached to said roller beneath said loops, and means depending from said roller and wound thereabout for adjustably tilting said roller to tilt said slats or to actuate said roller to elevate or lower said blind'.

14. A Venetian blind as defined in claim 13 wherein means is provided on said roller to retain said tapes and said cords in the proper transverse relation to each other and to said roller.

15. A Venetian blind as defined in claim 13 wherein separately formed guiding means is associated with said roller to properly position said tapes and said cords with relation to each other and to the roller.

16. VA Venetian blind comprising a plurality of conventionally slotted slats, a' plurality of laddered tapes for supporting said slats at points spaced longitudinally thereof, each of said tapes having inner'and outer members joined at their upper ends to form a loop above the upper slat of the blind, a toe rail fixed to the lower ends of said tapes, a spring type roller having a ratchet type control mechanism, said roller extending through saidloops at the upper ends of said tapes, said roller having a positioning groove formed therein to receive each of the tapes and position the tapes longitudinally of the roller, said roller also having .a winding groove formed centrally of the bottom of each of said positioning grooves, elevating cord extending from the toe rail through the slotsy in said slats and ilxed to said roller at the bottoms of Asaid winding grooves, and means depending from the roller for actuating the same against the force of its spring.

17. A Venetian blind asv dened in claim 16 wherein stiiening means is provided in the loops of said tapes to prevent said loops from sagging into said winding grooves.

18. In a Venetian blind, the combination of a plurality of slats having supporting tapes asso- 6 2,175,549 elated therewith, said slats having transverse slots is vrotated and over which said tapes are looped therein at points spaced so as to be located within said tapes, and said tapes having a toe rail located at their lower ends, elevating cords operative`y 'associated with said toe rail and extending upwardly through said slots within said tapes, and a single roller member to which said cords are attached to elevate the blind when said roller in frictional 'contact to support ysaid tapes for tilting of the slats while permitting rotation' of Y the roller member for raising 'and lowering of the blind.

.i MICHAEL J. NARDULLI. HAROLD Bu JACOBSOIFI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2562259 *Dec 19, 1949Jul 31, 1951Columbia Mills IncVenetian blind
US2584607 *May 13, 1950Feb 5, 1952Angelo F NaplesVenetian blind
US2598887 *Dec 7, 1949Jun 3, 1952Columbia Mills IncLift roller for venetian blinds
US2663368 *Mar 22, 1950Dec 22, 1953Brooks WalkerVenetian blind closed headrail
US3049175 *Sep 14, 1959Aug 14, 1962Nichibei Blind Mfg Co LtdCombination venetian blind tilter-lifter device
US5813447 *Apr 7, 1997Sep 29, 1998Lysyj; Phillip A.For a window opening
US6079471 *Apr 10, 1996Jun 27, 2000Newell Operating CompanyCordless, balanced window covering
US6234236Feb 4, 2000May 22, 2001Newell Operating CompanyCordless balanced window covering
US6289965Feb 11, 2000Sep 18, 2001Newell Operating CompanyTake-up drum for a cordless shade counterbalance
US6330899Nov 29, 1999Dec 18, 2001Newell Window Furnishings. Inc.Cordless balanced window covering
US6412537Jan 12, 1999Jul 2, 2002Newell Operating CompanyBottom rail weight and balancing system
US6474394Apr 16, 2001Nov 5, 2002Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Cordless, balanced window covering
US6491084Mar 14, 2001Dec 10, 2002Newell Operating CompanyBottom rail weight and balancing system
US6571853Jul 6, 2000Jun 3, 2003Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Cordless blind having variable resistance to movement
US6601635Sep 18, 2001Aug 5, 2003Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Cordless balanced window covering
US6644375Jan 9, 2001Nov 11, 2003Newell Window FurnishingsCordless blind brake
US6725897Nov 28, 2001Apr 27, 2004Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Variable friction device for a cordless blind
US6769471Sep 10, 2002Aug 3, 2004Newell Window Furnishings Inc.Bottom rail weight and balancing system
US7228797Nov 28, 2000Jun 12, 2007Sundberg-Ferar, Inc.Cordless blind
US7503370Apr 21, 2003Mar 17, 2009Newell Window Furnishings, Inc.Cordless balanced window covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/170, 160/176.10R
International ClassificationE06B9/28, E06B9/308
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/308
European ClassificationE06B9/308