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Publication numberUS2175568 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1939
Filing dateMay 25, 1938
Priority dateMay 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2175568 A, US 2175568A, US-A-2175568, US2175568 A, US2175568A
InventorsEwald Haustein Karl
Original AssigneeEwald Haustein Karl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacture of artificial building bodies
US 2175568 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1G6. COMPOSITIONS,

COATING R PLASTlC Patented Oct. 10, 1939 UNITED STATES Cross Reference PATENT OFFICE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL BUILDING BODIES Karl Ewald Haustein, Berlin, Germany No Drawing. Application May 25, 1938, Serial No. 209,981. In Germany May 25, 1937 2 Claims.

My invention relates to a new method for the manufacture of artificial building bodies, such as blocks and plates.

In the art of manufacturing artificial building bodies, it is well-known to mix wooden chips, fir-tree needles, straw or a similar fibrous material with cement and to form stones or plates from this mixture. After the cement has hardened the arising bodies possess good heat-insulating and sound-insulating qualities, but they are pretty much liable to be brittle and to break into pieces.

I have discovered that highly solid and elastic artificial bodies, such as stones and plates, can be manufactured from the above-mentioned materials, if the said fibrous materials are partly digested by means of an alkaline treatment, then treated with an ingredient able to lower its waterabsorbing qualities, such as a clay-pulp, an alkaline glue, resin-milk, or the like, and finally mixed with cement.

The manufacture of my improved artificial bodies, may be carried out in the following manner: 200 kg. of rye-straw are boiled for about one hour in a lime-sodium lye of about 3 B. Now the partly digested rye-fibre material is withdrawn from the lye, laid upon a wooden grate, and rinsed with water in order to remove the surplus of lye adhering to said material. While the straw is still boiling in the lye, 100 kg. of clay and about 3 kg. of sodium silicate are mixed with some hundred liters of water and stirred to a smooth pulp which is free of clods. Now the partly digested and rinsed rye-straw material is introduced into said pulp, mixed and kneaded therewith. At the same time 300-350 kg. of cement are mixed in a separate receptacle with such a quantity of water that a pulp of creamlike consistency is obtained. After the clay pulp and the partly digested rye-straw material have been thoroughly kneaded with one another, the cement pulp is slowly poured into the mixture, this latter being continually kneaded during this time.

Now the mixture is introduced into open wooden molds, covered with a stamp-like lid, thoroughly pressed, and allowed to dry in its compressed state for a time of 3-4 days at the open air. In order to facilitate removal of the hardened bodies from the molds, the inner surfaces of the same may be rubbed with a fat or a soap or may be covered with paper.

I have discovered that, in order to obtain good results it is not sufficient to treat the fibrous materials used for instance with cold lime lye, or the like, but that it is necessary to effect a strong alkaline digestion by which the fibrous texture is partly broken up by a chemical decomposition of the albumen complexes and mercaptanes, contained therein. Furthermore, I have discovered that in order to obtain satisfactory results, it is not sufiicient to mix said partly digested fibrous material immediately with cement, but to treat it first with an ingredient such as clay adapted to lower the water-absorbing qualities without changing its alkalinity.

Only by depriving the fibrous material of all acidic and acidfying components and-by treating it with an ingredient lowering its water-absorbing qualities I have attained an insoluble firm union between the fibrous material and the cement, and as a result of this union 1 am able to produce blocks and plates which are substantially harder, more elastic and break-proof than the usual artificial stones and plates, the fibrous contents of which are only enclosed by the cemegt and not in an intimate connection there- W1 Although having described my invention only by way of one example, it will be obvious to one skilled in the art that many natural fibrous materials other than rye-straw may also be employed within the scope of my invention. Likewise, my invention is not restricted to the abovestated proportions of fibrous materials, cement and clay, it being obvious that other percentages also may be used in order to attain, for instance, an especially hard or an especially voluminous building material, the fundamental rule of my invention concerning a method of attaining a permanent connection between the cement and the fibrous material.

I claim:

1. A method of producing artificial building bodies, which consists in digesting fibrous material by an alkaline chemical treatment, rinsing the digested material, treating the digested and rinsed material with a substance adapted to lower its water absorbing quality, thereafter mixing said material with a pulp of cement and water, introducing the mixture into a mold, compressing the mixture within said mold and allowing it to dry under pressure.

2. A method of producing artificial building bodies which consists in partly digesting rye straw by treating it with lime-sodium lye, rinsing the digested straw material to remove surplus lye adhering to it, adding to the digested and rinsed material a water-clay pulp and thoroughly kneading the mixture, thereafter adding a pulp of cement and water to said mixture, introducing the mixture into a mold, compressing the mixture within said mold and allowing it to dry under pressure.

KARL EWALD HAUSTEIN.

Examiner

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2909439 *Mar 9, 1955Oct 20, 1959Bernard BruntonMoulding plastic material
US3264125 *Dec 4, 1962Aug 2, 1966Versicrete IndManufacture of lightweight concrete products
US5196061 *Apr 26, 1990Mar 23, 1993Thomas Robert CCementitious composite that includes delignified cellulosic material and process of making it
US6676744Oct 2, 2001Jan 13, 2004James Hardie Research Pty LimitedFiber cement composite materials using cellulose fibers loaded with inorganic and/or organic substances
US6676745Oct 2, 2001Jan 13, 2004James Hardie Research Pty LimitedFiber cement composite materials using sized cellulose fibers
US6872246Jan 9, 2004Mar 29, 2005James Hardie Research Pty LimitedFiber cement composite materials using cellulose fibers loaded with inorganic and/or organic substances
US7344593Mar 1, 2002Mar 18, 2008James Hardie International Finance B.V.Fiber reinforced cement composite materials using chemically treated fibers with improved dispersibility
US7658794Apr 15, 2003Feb 9, 2010James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement building materials with low density additives
US7727329Feb 28, 2008Jun 1, 2010James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement building materials with low density additives
US7815841Jan 13, 2004Oct 19, 2010James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement composite materials using sized cellulose fibers
US7857906Feb 21, 2008Dec 28, 2010James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber reinforced cement composite materials using chemically treated fibers with improved dispersibility
US7942964Jan 7, 2004May 17, 2011James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement composite materials using bleached cellulose fibers
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US8209927Dec 20, 2007Jul 3, 2012James Hardie Technology LimitedStructural fiber cement building materials
US8268119Feb 17, 2012Sep 18, 2012James Hardie Technology LimitedMethod and apparatus for reducing impurities in cellulose fibers for manufacture of fiber reinforced cement composite materials
US8333836Apr 7, 2011Dec 18, 2012James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement composite materials using bleached cellulose fibers
US8603239Apr 25, 2012Dec 10, 2013James Hardie Technology LimitedFiber cement building materials with low density additives
US8993462Apr 12, 2007Mar 31, 2015James Hardie Technology LimitedSurface sealed reinforced building element
US20050126430 *Dec 16, 2004Jun 16, 2005Lightner James E.Jr.Building materials with bioresistant properties
US20050152621 *Jan 9, 2004Jul 14, 2005Healy Paul T.Computer mounted file folder apparatus
US20050200807 *Feb 24, 2004Sep 15, 2005Hillis W. D.Defect correction based on "virtual" lenslets
US20050235883 *Mar 29, 2005Oct 27, 2005Merkley Donald JFiber cement composite materials using cellulose fibers loaded with inorganic and/or organic substances
USRE32329 *Jul 13, 1984Jan 13, 1987 Method of adhering mineral deposit in wood fragment surfaces
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/794, 106/805
International ClassificationC04B18/28, C04B28/02
Cooperative ClassificationC04B28/02, C04B18/28
European ClassificationC04B18/28, C04B28/02