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Publication numberUS2175946 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1939
Filing dateNov 27, 1937
Priority dateJan 4, 1934
Publication numberUS 2175946 A, US 2175946A, US-A-2175946, US2175946 A, US2175946A
InventorsSmith Nelson J
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerating apparatus
US 2175946 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1939. sM 2,175,946

REFRIGERATING [APPARATUS Original Filed Jan. 4, 1954 2 s t s t 1 I INY ENTOR; BY 97 ATTORNEYS Oct. 10, 1939. N. J. SMITH 2,175,946

REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Original Filed Jan. 4, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 are IN VENTOR.

ATTORNEYS Patented Oct. 10, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE eral Motors Corporation, Dayton,

poration of Delaware Original application Ohio, a cor- January 4, 1934, Serial No.

705,187. Divided and this application November 2'7, 1937, Serial No 3 Claims.

This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus. More particularly the invention relates to improvements in air conditions of the self-contained type, which are adapted to be placed in rooms where central refrigerating installations are not conveniently available.

This application is a division of my copending application, Serial No. 705,187, filed January 4, 1934.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide improved and simple means for disposing of the moisture extracted from the air in this type of air conditioning apparatus.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of the present invention is clearly shown.

In the drawings: l

Fig. 1 is a vertical cross-sectional view, somewhat diagrammatic, of one form of my invention;

Fig. 2 is a view, somewhat similar to Fig. 1, but

4 showing another embodiment of my invention;

Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are views also similar to Fig. 1, but also showing other modifications; and

Figs. 6 and 7 show details of further modifications.

In practicing my invention, a complete air conditioning apparatus is preferably enclosed in a 30 unitary casing 10 divided by an insulating, par,-

tition H to form an air conditioning passageway I2 and heat dissipating passageway I3. The air conditioning apparatus is adapted to condition the air in an enclosure, such as a room, a wall 35 of which is fragmentarily indicated at H. Air from the enclosure enters the air conditioning apparatus at l5, passes through the air conditioning passageway 12 and is discharged back into the enclosure through the opening 15. If

L0 desired, a certain portion of air may also be introduced from outside of the enclosure into the passageway 12 through the fresh air intake pipe 15a. The air to be conditioned, and passing through the passageway 12, is cooled by coming in contact with a heat absorbing unit I1, preferably in the form of a volatile refrigerant evaporator, where moisture is generally extracted from the air being conditioned for the enclosure, because the air is generallychilled below its dew 0 point in passing in contact with the surfaces of the evaporator. The moisture thus extracted is gathered in a drain means 18, preferably in the form of a pan'undemeath the evaporator, from whence the moisture flows by gravity into an insulated evaporating container 19. Here the moisture is evaporated by heating means separate from the heat dissipating unit hereinafter to be described. This heating means preferably takes the form of an electric heater 20, vapor thus produced being eventually discharged to the exterior of the enclosure through the medium of the pipe 2| which discharges the vapors into the heat dissipating air stream hereinafter to be more fully described.

The electric heater 2!] may be of any suitable type. However, I prefer to use an electric heater which is automatically controlled in accordance with the level of the water in the receptacle 19. Thus the heater includes a lower conducting plate 2| a and an upper conducting plate 22 which are connected respectively to electrical leads as indicated. When the moisture rises and contacts with the upper plate 22, an electric circuit is established through the heater by electrolytic action, and the water is heated and evaporated because of the electrical resistance involved. When the level falls below the upper plate 22 the circult is broken and the heating action ceases.

The heat absorbing unit I! is connected to a heat dissipating unit 23. This latter unit dissipates the heat which was absorbed by the unit I! into an air dissipating air stream which is discharged to the exterior of the enclosure through the pipe 24. Preferably this heat dissipating air stream flows from the exterior of the enclosure through the pipe under the propelling force of a blower 26 which causes the air stream to pass through the passageway l3 and be discharged through the pipe 24 carrying with it the water vapor from receptacle l9 heretofore described. If desired, the pipes 24 and 25 may be connected to a ,window of the enclosure, or may be connected to openings especially made for them.

In this particular embodiment, the heat dissipating unit 23 takes the .form of a compressor 26 which forwards compressed refrigerant to a condenser 21 from whence the condensed re- ,frigerant flows to a receiver 28 and through a pipe 29 to an automatic expansion valve 30 to the evaporator 11 and back through the pipe 3| to the compressor 26. The compressor 26 is driven by a motor 32 which also may drive the blower 26 as indicated. In addition, an electrically driven blower 33 may be provided to circulate the stream of air through the passageway [2. The electric motors shown may be operated by'any suitable automatic control responsive to conditions in the enclosure or room, such as a thermostat, humidostat, or both. In addition,

suitable manual switches may be provided, as desired.

In the modification shown in Fig. 2, a casing I00 is separated by a partition IOI into the air conditioning passageway I02 and the heat dissipating passageway I03. A heat absorbing unit I04, in the form of a finned evaporator is placed in the passageway I02 together with a motordriven fan I05 and the moisture drain means I06, and an expansion valve I0! is also provided. The heat dissipating passageway I03 contains the compressor I08, condenser I09, receiver III], together with the compressor motor III and an electrically driven blower H2. The parts thus far described function substantially the same as the corresponding parts in Fig. 1. In this case, however, the moisture fromthe drain I06 is placed in contact with a" portion I00a, of the condenser by which it is evaporated. In this particular embodiment a pipe I I3 permits the moisture to flow by gravity into a pan H0 in which the portion I09a of the condenser is placed. Air intake pipe H5, and the air discharge pipe IIIS connect the passageway I03 with the exterior of the enclosure, while the air intake III and the discharge opening H8 connect the passageway l02 with the interior of the enclosure. The heat dissipating air stream carries the moisture evaporated from the body of water in pan H0 to the exterior through pipe H3.

In the modification shown in Fig. 3, the easing I is divided by the insulating partition I5I into an air conditioning passageway I52 and aheat dissipating passageway I53. Passageway I52 contains a heat absorbing unit I50, the drain means I55, an electrically driven blower I50, an intake passage I51 and an air discharge passage I50 connected with the enclosure or room. The heat dissipating passageway I53 contains the usual refrigerant liquefying or heat dissipating unit in the form of the compressor I59, condenser Ii receiver IBI and motor I62. An electrically driven blower I63 forces air from the exterior through the pipe I60 and discharges it through the pipe I65 to the exterior. In this modification, the moisture gathered in the pan I is sprayed or dripped by gravity through the spray-head I66 directly on the condenser I where it is turned into vapor and is discharged in the form of vapor to the exterior through the pipe I65.

In the form shown in Fig. 4 the casing 200 is divided by the insulating partition 20l into the air conditioning passageway 202 and air dissipating passageway 203. The passageway 202 contains the heat absorbing unit 204, the drain means 205, the electrically driven blower 206 and the automatic expansion valve 201. The heat dissipating passageway 203, contains the heat dissipating unit in the form of a compressor 208,

condenser 209, receiver 2I0, motor 2 and electrically driven blower 2 I2. Air from the exterior fiows through the pipe 2|3 through the passageway 203 and back to the exterior to the pipe 2 It. The moisture gathered in the pan 205 flows by gravity to the pan 2I5 where it is evaporated by the heat from the heat dissipating unit and is discharged in the form of vapor through the pipe 2! to the exterior of the enclosure.

In the form shown in Fig. 5, the casing 250 is divided by the heat insulating partition 25I into the air conditioning passageway 252 and heat dissipating passageway 253. The passageway 252 contains the heat absorbing unit 254, the electrically driven fan 255, the drain means 256 and the automatic expansion valve 251. Air enters from the enclosure through the opening 258 and is discharged to the enclosure through the opening 259. The heat dissipating passageway 253 contains the usual heat dissipating unit or refrigerant liquefying unit, in the form of a com pressor 260, condenser -26|, receiver 263, motor 25% and motor-driven blower 265 for causing air to flow through the pipe 266 from the exterior into the passageway 253 and back to the exterior through the pipe 261. The motor 264 which drives the compressor 250 is provided with a rotary sprayer 268. The drain means 266 is connected by a pipe 269 with the rotary sprayer 260 in such a manner that the moisture extracted from the air in the enclosure is discharged in the form of a spray into the enclosure 253 and from thence to the exterior through the pipe 251.

In the form shown in Fig. 6, the structure shown in Fig. 5 is modified in that the rotary sprayer 268 is changed to a rotary pump 270, which receives moisture through the pipe 269a and discharges it through the pipe 21 I in the form of a spray directly to the exterior. The spray thus promotes evaporation of the moisture.

In the form shown in Fig. '7, the structure shown in Fig. 5 is modified by changing the rotary sprayer 268 into a pump 280 which receives the moisture extracted from the room through the pipe 20% and discharges it through the pipe 20! to the wick means 282 placed on the exterior of the room. The moisture is thus pumped to the wick where it evaporates.

In all the modifications, the motors may be controlled by proper controls similar to those described for Fig. 1. Also, if desired, fresh air from the exterior may be introduced into the air conditioning passageways in addition to, or in lieu of the air from the enclosure. In general, where consistent, any description given relative to Fig. 1 is applicable to the remaining figures.

While the form of embodiment of the invention as herein disclosed, constitutes a preferred form, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. An apparatus for conditioning air in a room. comprising a cabinet to be placed in said room and having a first compartment and a second compartment, an evaporator in said first compartment, a refrigerant liquefying unit in said second compartment, a first horizontally disposed substantially straight air duct leading from without said room to the bottom of said second compartment, a second air duct leading from the top of said second compartment to without said room, means for evaporating moisture condensed by said evaporator in said second compartment adjacent one of said ducts, and means circulating air in through the lower duct into thermal exchange with said rcirigerant liquefying unit and out through the upper duct, the inlet for said first duct being located a substantial distance below the outlet for said second duct whereby the re circulation of air is substantially eliminated.

2. In combination, a cabinet having a first compartment and a second compartment located below said first compartment, an evaporator in said first compartment, a refrigerant liquefying unit in said second compartment in refrigerant flow relationship with said evaporator, an air intake at the rear of said cabinet adjacent the bottom of said second compartment, an air outlet at the rear of said cabinet a substantial distance above said intake, an air duct leading from said intake to the front of said second compartment, and means for circulating coiling air in through said intake, through said duct, rearwardly in thermal exchange with said refrigerant liquefying unit and out through said outlet, said outlet being arranged to discharge the air a substantial dis tance above said intake whereby recirculation of air is substantially eliminated.

3. In combination, a cabinet having a first compartment and a second compartment, an evaporator in said first compartment, a refrigerant liquefying unit in said second compartment in refrigerant flow relationship with said evaporator, an air intake opening at the rear of said cabinet adjacent the bottom of said second compartment, an air outlet opening at the rear of said cabinet a substantial distance above said intake opening, means for circulating cooling air in through said intake, and an air duct leading from one of said openings to the front of said second compartment whereby air circulated through said second compartment is required to flow to the front thereof before passing to the rear thereof, said outlet opening being arranged to discharge the air a substantial distance above said intake opening whereby recirculation of air is substantially eliminated.

NELSON J. SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2433960 *Feb 13, 1945Jan 6, 1948Sherman Robert SAir conditioning apparatus
US2514579 *May 11, 1946Jul 11, 1950Gen Motors CorpRefrigerating apparatus
US2655825 *Nov 29, 1951Oct 20, 1953Joseph GendronAutomatic sheet metal reforming hammer
US2702994 *Jun 20, 1951Mar 1, 1955Int Harvester CoAir conditioning apparatus for buildings
US2793508 *Dec 7, 1953May 28, 1957Mueller Moritz LHousehold air conditioning systems
US3097506 *Aug 14, 1961Jul 16, 1963Blakesley Sr George RAir conditioner apparatus
US3308635 *May 3, 1965Mar 14, 1967Peters LeoRefrigerating apparatus
US3831395 *May 30, 1973Aug 27, 1974Levy HAir conditioner
US4402191 *Jan 5, 1982Sep 6, 1983Thermo King CorporationEvaporator section for container refrigeration unit
US4409797 *Jun 10, 1982Oct 18, 1983Thermo King CorporationCondenser coil and fan mount for a transport refrigeration unit
US4475358 *Sep 3, 1982Oct 9, 1984Firma Ing. Rolf Seifert ElectronicAir conditioner
US4598558 *May 23, 1985Jul 8, 1986Thermal Concepts, Inc.Heat pump and method
US4644759 *Jun 30, 1986Feb 24, 1987Thermal Concepts, Inc.Heat pump and method
US4671076 *Aug 22, 1986Jun 9, 1987Duren Monica OCondensed vapor vent
US5540061 *Jan 5, 1993Jul 30, 1996Hitachi, Ltd.Refrigerator
US6360548 *Nov 13, 2000Mar 26, 2002Ramon Munoz NavarroOpen-fronted, refrigerated showcase with dual evaporators and dissipater pans
US20140216458 *Apr 17, 2014Aug 7, 2014Michael Dean AsbraAir Conditioned and Ambient Fresh Air Supply System for Respirator Users
DE3136226A1 *Sep 12, 1981Mar 31, 1983Seifert Electronic R"klimageraet"
WO1986003578A1 *Dec 11, 1985Jun 19, 1986Thermal Concepts, Inc.Heat pump and method
WO2001071259A1 *Mar 21, 2001Sep 27, 2001Jacques RollierReversible self-contained individual thermodynamic air-air heating apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/279, 62/291, 62/427, 62/263, 62/150, 62/506
International ClassificationF24F1/02
Cooperative ClassificationF24F1/022
European ClassificationF24F1/02B