Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2176699 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1939
Filing dateNov 10, 1937
Priority dateNov 10, 1937
Publication numberUS 2176699 A, US 2176699A, US-A-2176699, US2176699 A, US2176699A
InventorsAnderson Robert C
Original AssigneeBuckeye Iron And Brass Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nozzle
US 2176699 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 17, 1939. R, c, ANDERSON 2,176,699

NOZZLE Filed Nov. 10, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet l \NVENTOE ROBERT CANDERSON, 'fifi L a a ATTORNEYS Oct. 17, 1939. R. c. ANDERSON NOZZLE .Filed Nov. 10, 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 'IIIIIIIIIIIIIII/ D xlfflfllflllllllld 14/ INVENTOE ROBERT CANDERSON,

AT TURN EY5 Oct. 17, 1939. R. c. ANDERSON NOZZLE Filed Nov 10, 1937 s Sheets-Sheet s JMM ROBERT CfiNDERSON 5 J 2 r I v n.

Patented Oct. 17, 1939 PATENT OFFHIE NOZZLE Robert C. Anderson, Dayton, Ohio, assignor to Buckeye Iron and Brass Works, Dayton, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application November 10, 1937, Serial No. 173,893

7 Claims.

This invention relates to nozzles for hose used on fire apparatus and involves the objects hereinafter stated, first observing that I have found by actual practice and use of this invention that a body of spray formed of minute particles of water and shot by pressure into burning parts of a structure and in the midst of flames, will quench the fire more rapidly and efiiciently than solid streamsof water delivered from a nozzle.

My objects are:

1. To provide a spray section in the nozzle adapted to allow a stream of water to pass through it on to the discharge end of the nozzle; or to allow the water so to pass through it concurrently with diverting part of the water and (a) Converting the diverted portion of water into a volume of sprayas the result of one adjustment, to play on the fire; and

(1)) Converting a part of the water into minute particles by another adjustment, to form, a fog or cloud-like curtain or screen directed to intervene between the firemen and the fire or heat, to protect them from their otherwise exposure to the scorching and burning high temperatures resulting from their nearness to the burning structures.

2. To provide said spray section with features which with one adjustment will direct the spray toward the fire in a fan-like body; and by another adjustment will create and direct a foglike body immediately in front of the firemen engaged in holding the nozzle.

My invention here set forth embraces also my method of putting out fires, as well when they result from oils, gasoline .or other volatile liquids,

whether floating on water or in bulk in the absence of water, as when the fire is devouring structures of wood or other inflammable material.

I haveobserved that streams of water under high pressure to reach burning objects, will scatter oil, gasoline or other volatile liquids, and drive quantities of such burning liquid here, and there, even beyond the immediate fire, and create conflagrations wherever the burning oil or other liquid flows or scatters. But under my method the water spray will not produce the scattering of the burning liquids because the spray is too light and lacking in the solidity 0f the ordinary water streams, and toolacking in the capacity to scatter burning particles; and as a consequence under my method the burning particles are drenched with the condensation of my body of spray.

In short, in my method I extinguish, without scattering, the burning particles by the condensation of the volume of water sprays-all as hereinafter stated in detail.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a conventional hose nozzle with my improvement incorporated in such nozzle.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal view of the entire nozzle including the tip section at the end, the cut-off mechanism, the spray section and the handle portion of the nozzle.

Figure 3 is a partial plan View and partial section on the line 3-3 of Figure 4 looking downward.

Figure 4 is a detail longitudinal section through the sprap section apart from the other nozzle parts.

Figure 5 is a partial plan View and cross-section on the line 55 of Figure 4 looking downward.

Figure 6 is a vertical sectional view such as shown in Figure 4, but with the adjustment of the collar to cause the water to be converted into a fog or cloud-lke curtain to intervene between the firemen and the heat or fire.

Figure? is a general view of the nozzle with my improvements shown in action to put out a fire, the stream resulting from the conventional features of the nozzle and the spray, the prod uct of parts of this invention.

Figure 8 is a view of the stream of water and the vapory screen spread in front of the position of the firemen to protect them from the heat of the conflagration.

Figure 9 is a side elevation of the spray section of the nozzle shown delivering a cloud of vapor on and against the flames and burning particles.

Figure 10 is a side elevation showing the spray section delivering the spray in a horizontal line or at right angles to the axis of the section.

Figure 11 is a similar View to Figure 10 to more clearly show the passageway through which the water passes.

In Figures 1 and 2 I have shown the nozzle complete-in. side elevation in Figure 1 and in longitudinal section in, Figure 2.

Figure 1 shows the exterior and Figure 2 the interior of the nozzle and the several parts of which it is composed. The numeral l indicates the tip section which is the discharge end of the nozzle. This section can be removed and a longer or shorterone substituted. It is screwed to the sh'ut-ofi or cut-off sectionv 2 which conta'ins the shut-off or cut-01f valve 3 with its opcrating nozzle 4. A movement of the handle in the direction of the arrow will close or partially close the interior passageway which is occupied by the water, and thereby cut off the stream, or reduce its volume.

The next feature is the spray section indicated at 5 and composed of the cylindrical portion 6 having a series of holes indicated at E, and further composed of the collar 8 screwed on the cylindrical portion 6 and a ring 9 also screwed on the section 6. The collar is formed with a hexagonal portion ll adapted to receive a wrench or to be grasped by the hand of the firemen to adjust the collar with respect to the ring 9. The collar has a flared portion l which receives the ring 9 to regulate the size of the passageway 9a for forming and issuing the spray of water.

In Figure 2 the passageway 9a is closed as shown by the collar 8 being situated up against the ring 9, while in Figure 6 the collar has been adjusted away from the ring to open the passageway 9a which governs and determines the size and nature of the sheet of water spray that passes through the passageway 9a between the portion 923 of the collar and the lower end of the ring 9, the spray being allowed or induced by the bevel 9b to spread upward as well as outward. I also provide a circular flange or projection 90 which cooperates with the collar it and the ring 9 in directing the spray in a radial direction. These features are best shown in Figure 6.

Figure 10 shows the spray section delivering the spray in substantially a horizontal direction all around the circumference of the device. The spray section will deliver such spray in a plane substantially at right angles to the axis of the device, and when held in a vertical position the spray will be delivered horizontally.

In Figure 10 the water is being sprayed and delivered while in Figure 11 the passageway through which the water travels and by which it is controlled is clearly shown because not obsoured by the issuance of the spray.

An annular space I2 is formed inside of the collar to receive a suitable packing to prevent leakage around the collar. It will be observed that this spray-section is screwed to the shutoff section 2, which has a handle 4 to open and close the valve 3. Suitable washers indicated at E are placed between the several sections where they come together to insure non-leaking connections. The handle-section I 4 carries two hand-grips it which are held each by a fireman in addition to the one or two firemen that may grab the handle-section.

It will be observed from the foregoing description and Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 particularly, that the passageway 9a in the spray-section 5 for the water to pass through is regulated as to its size by quickly-made adjustments of the collar 3 with respect to the ring 9. When a solid stream of water alone is to be thrown on the fire then the parts will be in the relative positions shown in Figure 2; and when so adjusted, as in Figure 2, the spray-section is inoperative and the bold, solid stream of water alone will be used to extinguish the fire. But when it is desired to accompany such solid stream with a sheet of spray, to play on the fire, the collar 8 of the spray-section is adjusted with respect to the ring 9, whereby a volume of spray will be produced to also play on the fire. And when it is desired to produce from the water a fog or cloud-like curtain, to protect the firemen, the

collar 8 will be adjusted with respect to the ring 9 as shown in Figure 6.

When the conflagration involves burning oil, gasoline, or other volatile fluids, and it is desired to use this invention in extinguishing the fire without scattering the burning particles here and there, as is the fact in the case of the use of solid streams of water projected against the burning oil, etc., the shut-off is used to eliminate the stream of water, and the spray section is adjusted to produce a volume of spray and project it to and upon the burning oil or other volatile substance, whereby the flames will be extinguished without being scattered and increasing the conflagration-vvith the likelihood of endangering whatever structure the burning oil, gas or other volatile material may reach. In this last operation, the intense volume of spray envelops the burning oil, etc., and is rapidly condensed into bodies of water deposited on the burning material and extinguishing the fire without scattering the oil, etc.

Again it must be borne in mind that the apparatus and the method branch of this invention, to be developed later, are capable of playing on fires with both the solid stream and the volume of spray at the same time; and further, that while the stream is playing on the fire the spray section of the nozzle can be adjusted to deliver sheets of fog or cloud-like curtains to protect the firemen from the heat or fire while the solid stream is playing on the fire.

In Figure '7 I have shown the simultaneous production and delivery of the solid stream of water and the volume of spray.

Figure 8 is a view showing the production and delivery of the solid stream and the fog or cloudlike curtain to protect the firemen.

Figure 9 is a view showing the delivery from the nozzle of a volume of spray onto the fire, the stream being cut off, to avoid scattering any burning oil, gasoline or other volatile material.

I shall now state the steps of my method:

(a) I convert large bodies of water into volumes of spray and deliver such spray bodies on and into a burning mass of oil, gasoline or other volatile liquid, found in a body, or floating on water.

(b) In this step I deliver strong streams of water accompanied by large volumes of water in the form of sprays, so as to simultaneously, and/or alternately, use the solid stream and the volume of the spray, or use only the volume of spray separately, or use the solid stream alone and separately. 7 (c) In this step I deliver strong streams of water accompanied by a fog or cloud-like curtain or screen, spread out in diameter so as to protect the firemen from the heat or flames the solid stream is playing on.

From the foregoing disclosure it will be observed that my invention set forth herein produces a fog-curtain to protect the firemen against the heat of the conflagration,

My invention also produces a volume of spray obtained by the disintegration of a stream of water under pressure which, when projected upon a burning substance, such as a building or portions thereof, will condense from the heat of the fire and extinguish the fire by the action of the condensation, this being accomplished under one adjustment of my device.

My invention further comprehends, as indicated, the production of solid, forceful water streams to be projected into fires to extinguish them, this result flowing from one adjustment of my apparatus; and alternately, creating from a part of all of the water admitted into the device, a volume of spray projected, concurrently or separately, into and amongst the fire, this last result flowing from, another adjustment of my apparatus, all as shown in Figure 7, and/or Figure 8, the latter when producing a fog to create a protecting curtain.

And again, it will be understood that in one adjustment of my spray-section I create a dense volume of mist or spray and deliver this body forcefully to and amongst the fire, with the result that the wet cloud thus created quickly condenses and thereby extinguishes the fire, more efiiciently under some circumstances than has been done by a solid steady stream of water.

It will be understood that the above-described structure is merely illustrative of the manner in which the principle of my invention may be utilized, and that I desire to comprehend within my invention such modifications as come within the scope of the claims and the invention.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

1. In a nozzle, a spray section comprising a cylindrical portion having orifices for the passage of water, a collar and a ring mounted on said cylindrical portion for longitudinal displacement, and having a space between them communicating with the orifices, and a circular flange adjacent the orifices cooperating with the collar and the ring, these elements of collar, ring and flange being adapted by one adjustment to produce and direct a spray of water in a radial direction, and adapted by another adjustment to produce and direct a fog-like spray in difierent directions.

2. In a nozzle having a water shut-off, a cylindrical portion having orifices, and a collar and a ring having a circumferential space between them, and a circular flange which cooperates with the collar and ring, said space receiving water through said orifices, either the collar or the ring being capable of relative longitudinal adjustments, one adjustment to direct the spray in a radial direction away from the nozzle, and the other adjustment to direct the spray essentially upward and essentially downward from the nozzle to form a curtain protecting the firemen at the hose from the heat beyond the plane of the curtain.

3. In a nozzle, a spray section comprising a cylindrical portion having orifices, and a collar and a ring for longitudinal displacement and a flange, with an annular space between the collar, the ring and the flange communicating with the orifices, the collar adapted to be positioned in difierent distances from the ring and the ring having a marginal annular surface which functions to direct the spray in a forward and upward direction from the hose and toward the -fire, and the flange adjacent the orifices cooperating with the ring to direct the spray in a radial direction.

4. In a nozzle for a fire hose, the combination with a water cut-off located near the outer end of the nozzle and adapted to permit and prevent the flow of water through the nozzle, of a section beneath the cut-off having orifices to allow the flow of water to pass therefrom, a ring and a collar on said section for longitudinal displacement, a space between them communicating with the orifices, and a circular flange adjacent the orifices cooperating with said collar and ring, these elements adapted by one adjustment to direct the water upwardly and outwardly and by another adjustment to direct the water radially to form a circular fog-like water-curtain to protect the firemen from the heat of a conflagration; said cut-off controlling the passage of solid streams, and said ring and collar controlling the flow or stoppage of the water through the orifices to make, or not, said water-curtain.

5. In a nozzle for a, fire hose, the combination with a cylindrical portion having a series of orifices for the passage of water, such portion having a ring and a collar for longitudinal displacement, a space between them communicating with the orifices, a circular flange adjacent the orifices cooperating with said collar and ring, these elements' adapted to be put in contact to stop the flow of water and adapted to be opened to permit the flow thereof, said ring, collar and flange cooperating to reduce the water to a Vigorous spray by one adjustment of said parts in an upward inclined position, and adapted by another adjustment to create such spray and force it in streams at essentially right angles to the axis of said cylindrical portion; of nozzle sections connected to said portion, a water cut-off mounted above or beyond the cylindrical portion and its orifices, the other section of the nozzle adapted to be connected to a hose, whereby in use the water stream through the nozzle is controlled by said cut-ofi so placed, and whereby the water flow through the orifices is converted into streams of spray, such spray ascending essentially upward with one adjustment of the collar and by another adjustment such spray projected at substantially right angles to the nozzle to form a circular fog-like water-curtain to protect the firemen from the heat of the conflagration.

6. In a nozzle for a fire hose, the combination with a pipe section having perforations to receive the water, of a ring secured to said pipe section and having its lower outer corner beveled at an incline and a collar adjustably mounted on said pipe section and having an inclined portion near said incline on the ring, for longitudinal displacement; and a circumferential flange adjacent the orifices cooperating with said ring and collar, one or both parts comprising the ring and collar being adapted to be adjusted to vary the space between them communicating with the orifices at their water discharging peripheries, whereby to direct the water sprays in a course along the discharge end of the nozzle or to direct the sprays in a transverse direction whereby to form a circular fog-like water curtain.

'7. In a nozzle for a fire-hose, the combination of the discharge portion of the nozzle and a cutoif mounted therein, with the receiving section of the nozzle and an intermediate section having orifices for the flow of water, and devices comprising a ring and a collar capable of longitudinal displacement, and a space between the ring and collar communicating with the orifices, and a cooperating circular flange, the ring, collar and flange being carried by the orificed section and adapted to be adjusted to convert the water streams from the orifices into jets of spray; said nozzle sections including the intermediate orificed section having a single hollow Water-way.

ROBERT C. ANDERSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2570828 *Apr 24, 1947Oct 9, 1951Martin John NProtective spray fire nozzle
US3163363 *Dec 10, 1962Dec 29, 1964Travis Ralph LCombination fog, straight stream, and spray nozzle
US3241773 *Feb 14, 1964Mar 22, 1966Travis Ralph LCombination hose nozzle
US4194694 *Apr 18, 1978Mar 25, 1980Hickerson Frederick RFluid control valve
US5261494 *Jul 17, 1991Nov 16, 1993Mcloughlin John EFirefighting nozzle
US5360168 *Dec 14, 1992Nov 1, 1994Mccue David NFire hose support
US6089474 *Jan 19, 1999Jul 18, 2000Marino; Robert M.Hose nozzle apparatus and method
US6719269May 3, 2001Apr 13, 2004Ted RosasMethod and apparatus for constructing a regulatable fire fighting water supply line from a continuously pressurized waterline
US6758413 *Mar 14, 2003Jul 6, 2004Pao-Tien ChenSprinkler
US7097120Nov 27, 2002Aug 29, 2006Watershield LlcHose nozzle apparatus and method
US8002201Jul 13, 2008Aug 23, 2011Watershield LlcHose nozzle apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/441, 239/444, 239/525
International ClassificationA62C2/00, A62C2/08
Cooperative ClassificationA62C2/08
European ClassificationA62C2/08