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Publication numberUS2177656 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1939
Filing dateJun 30, 1933
Priority dateJun 30, 1933
Publication numberUS 2177656 A, US 2177656A, US-A-2177656, US2177656 A, US2177656A
InventorsKaddeland Christen R
Original AssigneeHarris Seybold Potter Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gravure printing press
US 2177656 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3l, 1939. c. R. KADDELAND GRAVURE PRINTING PRESS 4 Sheets-Sheetl l Filed June 3G, 1935 'unwNNNNNNNNNNNNwNNNNNNMS iNvENToR msnen re. KADDELANU Oct. 3l, 1939. c, R. KADDELAND GRAVURE PRINTING PRESS Filed June 30, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 w m y..

E il.. VEL mgl E i.lll l--- INVENTOR CHRISTEN KKH DDELHND BY ATTORNEY Oct. 31, 1939. c. RA KADDELAND I GRAVURE PRINTING PRESS 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 30, 1935 INVENTOR CHR5T'EN R. KADO LANP ATTORNEY Oct. 3l, 1939. c, R, KADDELAND GRAVURE PRINTNG PRESS Filed June 30, 1933 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented oct. 31, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE i GRAVURE rRm'rmG PRESS christen R. Kaaaelana, sueltan, conn., assigner. to Harris-Seybold-Potter Company, Cleveland, i Ohio, a corporation of Delawarev Application June 30, 1933, Serial-No. 678,431

29 Claims. (Cl. 101-157) My invention relates to improved methods in rotary gravure printing and improved rotary gravure presses using intaglio printing cylinders, 'and more particularly to new and useful improvements in the inking .methods and mechanisms for applying liquid ink in va solid stream to the printing-cylinder.

The objects ofmy invention are, among other things, to attain a complte and effective inking of the design on the printing cylinder, and, in

certain aspects, my invention is particularly adapted for using the quick-drying inks now used in very rapid rotary gravure printing.

According to my invention, I provide a comand the inked design thereon is almost imme-Y diately printed on the paper without allowing the highly volatile ink to dry on such printing cyl- :i0 inder. y

According to my inventionl this ink is forced to ow outwardly in a solid volume or stream from the confined `body of ink, more or less in circulation, under pressure along the surface of 35 the design on the printing cylinder so as to dissolve and wash away any dried ink or other objectionable foreign matter adhering to this design to' the end that a clean and freshly inked design is almost immediately presented at thel 40 printing line of the paper;

My invention is adapted for use in many types of rota-ry gravure presses, and may be used, for example,l in those web gravure presses of the type disclosed in my application for U. S. Letters 45 Patent illed May 20, 1933, Serial No. 671,992,

' now patented, Number-2,064,168. dated Dec. 15,

1936, which embodies, among other things.' a novel andr simpliiied'type of rotary printingpress in which the intaglio printing cylinder oi.'

im a printing unit is rotatable in either direction' through a reversible clutch drive, the press frames'being shaped to permit thel printing cylinder to be readily installed in, or removed from, the press from either end of the printing unit, 55 whereby an exchange of printing cylinders may be made which is an important advantage in rotary gravure presses.

Further objects of my invention are, among other things, to provide a new and improved form of ink distribution system for the intaglio cylinders that may be arranged as desired on eitheg side of the printing cylinder depending on t e direction yoi cylinder rotation as well as above or below the lateral diameter of such cylinder whenever required. i.

' A further object is to provide improved mechanism for forcing the volatile liquid ink under pressure against the etched surface of the revolving printing-cylinder togethery with means for maintaining pressure for the ink mpinging against the etched surface, while embodying improved devices to remove (the surplus ink and return same to the source of supply for preservation and re-use.

A further object oi. my invention is toprovide an improved ink distribution for gravure printing presses by which the volatile liquid ink will be. distributed over the rotating vintaglio printing cylinder without permitting any of the ink to ,escape during'the inking process, except that 25 reqpired to iill the ink wells in this cylinder which represent the image to be printed. My improved deviceis also builtin such manner as to t,

of the reciprocating doctor blade or knife so that the pressure of this doctor blade or knife against the printing cylinder may .be varied transversely across the press to insure perfectl removal of the surplus ink without injuring or defacing the engraved surfaces of such cylinder.

Afurther feature of my invention is the proe vision of a novel form of`doctor blade mechanism for use in my shiftable ink distribution system by which the doctor blade' or blades may be readily moved away from the printing cylinder when an exchange of printing cylinders is to be made, coupled with improved mechanism for imparting the usual reciprocating movement of the doctor blade across the etched surface of the revolving cylinder whereby a uniform and ,f

even movement is given to this doctor blade in all parts of its successive cycles.

A further feature of my invention is a novel form for the ink `fountain which comprises an intaglo printing cylinder;

inner pressure chamber closely adjacent to the periphery of the printing cylinder, which pressure chamber has a comparatively narrow aperture so as to permit the ink to escape in all four directions against the cylinder surface so that any residue on the cylinder may be washed away by the passage of fresh ink. The surplus i k iiows into i a normal pressure return cham er surrounding the pressure chamber, from which return chamber the surplus ink is conveyed to the supply reservoir in which the ink is agitated and mixed with the fresh ink supply, and by means of a pump forced back into the pressure chamber, thereby making a complete circulating system in which the solid matters and liquid solvent are constantly kept in solution.

Further objects .and advantages will appear hereinafter and be particularly pointed out in the appended claims, and the drawings show a preferred embodiment of my invention as; applied to a web gravure printing-press such as is shown and described in my said co-pending application Serial No, 671,992, in which my improved ink distribution system herein disclosed is particularly adapted for use. However, my improvements are not necessarily limited to any particular form or type` of gravure printingpress construction. Y

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is an elevation of the lower portion of a web gravure press looking from the right in Fig.

3 and embodying my improvements as positioned on the intaglio printing clinder, certain parts being shown in vertical section;

Fig. 2 is' an end elevation of the ink reservoir and associated devices,- partly -in section, and locatedv outside the press frames`to the left of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the press and ink reservoir with the ink fountain shown in dotted lines and looking from left of Figs.` 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged vertical section ofzthe ink fountain and doctor blade with' associated devices arranged in contact with the printing cylin-` der that are shown in dotted lines in Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is an elevation View looking from thez right of Fig. 4;

of Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged section'on the line 1- 1 Fig. 9 is a detail side view showing the` guide' bracket for the ink fountainand mechanism for reciprocating the doctor blade;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged section of the doctor blade and associated devices 'also shown in Fig.. 4; Fig. 11 is a sectional view,similar to Fig. 4; showing the undershot ink fountain and `doctor blade when located on the under sides of the ='Fig. 12 is a digrammatic lay-out of the different positions for the ink fountains in relaticn to the printing cylinder that ymayloe rotated in.

either direction as indicated by the arrows;

Fig. 13 is a detail sectional vievv taken on the..

line I3-I3 of Fig. 11; and

Fig. 14 is a detail elevation looking from the y right of Fig. 11 when the printing cylinder is removed. s e

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several figures. v

Referring to the drawings and more particularly to Figs 1 and 3, the press frames I5 and I6k are mounted on the base I1 in spaced-apart relation to aord sufilcient space efor the cylinders of the printing unit and their respective shafts which are preferably removable and adjustable in the press frames I5 and I6, as more particularly set forth in my pending application for patent Serial No. 671,992 hereinbefore mentionedL The web gravure printing-press proper comprises the printing cylinder I8 having its shaft I9 journalled in the press frames I5 and I6 (Fig. 1), the therewith coacting rubber cylinder 20 and the pressure cylinder 2| of the usualconstruction and mounting (Fig. 3). The web W is also shown in Fig. 3 in printing relation with the cylinders I8 and,20.

The printing cylinder shaft I9 carries outside the press frame I6 the coupling member 22 which is releasably engaged by the pins 23 pinned tothe coupling member 24 slidably secured to the short shaft 25 journaled in the standard 26 as shown to the left in Fig. 1. The shaft 25 carries the bevel gear 21 that is driven by the bevel gear 28 fastenedv to the power shaft 29 that printing cylinder I8 as shown in the upper part .of Fig. 12 depending upon the direction of rotation Vof the printing cylinder I8.y

- The arms 30. and 3| are held in proper angular positionto secure radial adjustment of the ink fountain for cylinders of different sizes by latch pins 32 that engage suitable holes drilled in the press frames I5 and I6 to make the proper adjustments.

e Means are provided for adjustably mounting the ink fountain and associated devices on the i @swinging arms 30 and 3I to accommodate for Fig. 6 is asectional detail view of the line 6-6 printing cylinders I8 having variable diameters which are best shown in Figs. 1, 3 and 9: Such devices are duplicated on the press frames I5 and I6, and a description of one set will suffice for both. Taking the swinging arm 30 (to the left in Fig, 1)-, the guide bracket 33 which supports the ink fountain is sleeved on the arm 30 which carries on its upper end the 'apertured' lug 34 through which passes the screw-bolt 35 having its upper end 35 squared for a wrench. This screw-bolt 35 passes through the interiorly threaded lug 31 on the upper end ofthe guide bracket 33, While the lower end of the guide bracket 33 carries the collar 38 that slides on the arm 3|. By this mechanism vthe guide bracket 33 may be raised or lowered on the arm 30 to make adjustments ofthe position ,of the inkv fountain and associated devices relatively tothe printing cylinder I8 and such bracket 33 is'held in position on the arm 30 by the set-screwv 39 (Figs. 3 and 9).

Pinned to the collars ss on either sideof lthe press inside the press frames I5 and l8 (Figs. 1 and 9) is the flat cross-plate 4|)y that supports the ink fountain and associated devices that are best shown in Figs. 1, 3, 4 and 9: Mounted on the plate 40 is the inkfountain proper comprising an irregularly shaped casting 4I having the end walls 42 and 43 (Figs. 1, 6 and 7), which carry vthe wedge-shaped ink pressure chamber 44 formed in the casting 45 with the top plate 46 and under plate 41 to form an elongated narrow orifice 48 through which the ink under pressure is forced against,and impinges on, the cylinder I8 as shown more particularly in Figs. 4 and 6.

The spacing blocks 49 secure the pressure chamber 44 to the fountain casting 4I fastened to thesupport plate 40 which also carries a exible plate 95 adapted to rest against the periphery of the cylinder |8.

The end walls 42 and 43 are fastened and sealed to the fountain casting 4I and support plate 40 in such manner as to leave a space between the closed ends of the pressure chamber 44 and these end walls 42 and 43, and also allow the ends of the printing cylinder I8 to project beyond the end walls 42 and 43. The end walls 42 and 43 are also formed so as to support the ends of the L-shaped doctor blade bar |I3 with the doctor blade ,94 and supporting plate |I8, and are provided with a U-shaped packing 54 held in contact with the cylinder I8 (Figs. 4, 6 and 7) by means of the exible spring 53 arranged within the elongated socket 50 and secured by means of clamp screw and washer 52 to the end walls 42 and 43.

The resiliency of the packing 54 and spring 53 compensates for cylinders of various sizes, a small cylinder I8 beingshown in dot and dash lines in Fig. 7. This construction affords a substantially air-tight -receiving chamber surrounding the pressure chamber 44, the upper portion being indicated at 96, while the lower portion of this receiving chamber is indicated at 91.

Means are provided for forcing the liquid ink under pressure from the source of supply through the pressure chamber 44 against the etched or engraved surface of the printing cylinder I8, combined with means to return the surplus ink removed from such surface by the doctor blade mechanism to the source of supply for preservation and re-use, all of which is best shown in Figs. 1-6; Outside the press frame I5 is the ink supply reservoir 55 mounted on the legs 56 and is provided with the inlet 51 and cap 58 through which the ink is poured into the reservoir 55 when the cap 58 is removed. Centrally mounted within the reservoir 55 is the rotary shaft 59 driven by the sprockets 60 around which passes the chain 6I actuated by the sprocket 83 mounted onthe shaft 64 of the motor 85 fastened to the top of the side-wall 86 of the reservoir 55' (Fig. 2).

Fastened to the shaft 59 near the bottom of the reservoir 55 are a pair of stirrers 81 that agitate the ink to maintain a uniform consistency in solution before the ink passes through the circular opening 68 in the bottom v69 of the reservoir which supports the rotary centrifugal pump casting 10. The pump proper is ,composed of the rotary member 1I fastened to the lower portion of the shaft 59 by the cross pin 12. The Vend of the shaft 59 revolves in the socket bearing 13 in the casting 10.

The member 1I' has formed therein a plurality of outwardly flaring' passages 14 (two being shown in Fig. 2) ,through which the ink is drawn from the reservoir 55 as indicated by the arrows and forced under pressure against the sidewalls of the casting into the circular chamber 15 from which the ink under pressure passes through the pipe to the pressure chamber 11 formed in the casting 1'8 that is supported on the base 19 between the press frames I5 and I6.

Pivotally mounted to the casting 18 on the hollow roller 80 is the rocking pipe casting 8| having the circular chamber 82 that registers with the pressure chamber 11. This chamber 82 communicates with the pipe 83 fastened to the top of the casting 8| and the smaller pipe 84 is adjustably telescoped within the pipe 83 where it is held against leakage by the stuffing-box 85. As shown in Figs, 1 and 3, the upper end of the pipe 84 is' connected with the chamber 86 formed in the casting 81 rotatably pivoted on the hollow roller 88 to the casting 89 fastened by screws 90 to the ink fountain casting 4I and the cross bar 9| secured to the ink fountain end walls 42 and 43 (Fig. 1). The chamber 86 communicates with the chamber 92 formed in the casting 89, which chamber 92 is connected by the pipe 93 to the inner pressure chamber 44 to force the liquid ink against the periphery of the cylinder I8 throughout its width which is less than the distance between the end walls 42 and 43 that carry felt pads 54 as shown more particularly in Figs. 4 and 6. The arrows in Figs. 2, 3 and 4 indicate the path of the ink forced under pressure from the bottom of the reservoir 55 to the cylinder I8.

'I'he liquid ink that is forced against the cylinder I8 forms a closed ink-circulating system due to the highly volatile nature of the solvent used in the manufacture of the ink. Such solvent always forms sufficient vapor to replace, in fact more than replace, the volume of liquid ink carried out of the closed system by the revolving printing-cylinder I8, so that the space within the system not occupied by the liquid ink is completely lled by the saturated solvent vapor. Such closed system for the ,circulating ink is one of the advantages of my invention in that the escape of such highly-explosive saturated vapor is prevented. Even with the use of a non-vaporizing liquid printing ink, any vacuum caused by 7 withdrawal of such ink would not interfere with the proper coating of the cylinder I8,\since in printing practice the circulating system, and more particularly the reservoir 55, is never completely filled with the ink.

Referring again to Figs. 2-4, the surplus ink vafter issuing from the elongated orifice 48 in all four directions under pressure is removed from the etched surface of the cylinder I8 by the reciprocating doctor blade 94 and passes into the reveyed by the pipe I 03 adjustably telescoped within'the pipe |04 to the outlet chamber |05 in the casting 8|. The stuing-box |06 on the upper end of the pipe |04 prevents any leakage of ink from the two pipes |03 and |04. From the chamber I 05 the surplus ink passes into the chamber |01 in the casting 18, and thence through the interconnected pipes |08, |09 and ||0 into the suction pump |10A secured to the reservoir 55, such pump being driven by means of the chain 6I through the sprocket 62 and shaft H03. This suction pump IIO^ is used to discharge the surplus ink through the pipe III into the upper part of the reservoir 55 above the strainer ||2 (Figs. 1-3) Thearrows in Figs. 1-4 show the path of the surplus ink flowing under normal pressure from the surface of the cylinder |8 back into the reservoir 55 Where it is preserved for re-use under forced pressure by the devices hereinbefore described.

The reciprocating doctor blade construction with associated devices for adjusting and holding the edge of the doctor blade 94 with the required pressure on the peripheral surface of the printing cylinder I8 is best shown in Figs. 1, 4-6, 8 and 10: The slidable L-shaped bar ||3 extends across the press, and rests on the casting 4| (Fig. 4) and end walls 42and 43 (Figs. 6 and 7) this bar I I3 has a series of slots ||4 (four being shown in Fig. 1) through which the screw-bolts I5 pass and are tapped into the casting 4| (Fig. 4). The washers I|6 are placed between'the heads of the bolts ||5 and the elongated top surfaces of the slots ||4 and are held in position by spacers ||1.

At the forward end of the bar ||3 (Figs. 4 and 10) is the transverse plate ||8 held in position by the key ||9 to which the doctor blade 94, spacer |20 and doctor reenforcing blade |2| are fastened by the clamping plate |22 which is held to thev plate ||8 by a series of screw-bolts |23 (only one being shown in Figs. 4 and 10) that are tapped into the plate I I8.

At convenient intervals the two adjacent plates ||8 and |22 have interiorly threaded sockets |24 into which adjusting screws |25 are tted, the forward ends of the screws |25 bearing against the rear edge of the doctor blade 94 to adjust the position ofthe doctor blade 94 with reference to the plate ||8.

To removably hold the doctor blade 94 and the several clamping plates in position on the bar I |3, I have provided a special form of clamping device best shown in Figs. 1, 2, 4 "and 5: Extending lengthwise of the ink fountain is the transverse bar |31 adapted to impinge against the doctor blade 'clamping plate |22. This bar |31 is fastened to the lugs |36 integral with a series of arms |32 by the screws |38.

The arms |32 have trunnions |21 journalled in the brackets |28 which are 'fastened to the slidable bar H3. Journalled in the upper portion of the brackets |28 are the cross pins |29 to which the clamp bolt |30 is fastened, this bolt |36 being screw threaded at its outer end to carry the knurled nut |34 adapted to abut against the outer face of the U-shaped lugs |33 on the left sides of the arms |32 (Fig. 5). The tightening of the nuts |34 wilcause the arms |32 and bar |31 to pivot about the trunnions |21 so that `the downwardly-projecting nose |39 on the bar |31 will lock the doctor blade 94 with associated plates in position on the sliding bar ||3.

Conversely when this nut |34 is loosened so as to permit it and the bolt |30 to drop down to the position shown in dotl and dash lines in Fig. 4, the bar |31 and associated arms |32 are free, and may be swung upwardly to the right (Fig. 4), and thus leave the doctor blade 94 with associated plates shown in Fig. 10 free and removable. Referring more particularly to Figs. 4, 5 and 8, the bar |31 is formed with a series of spacedapart lugs |40 having their under sides rounded out to receive the cross-rodl |4| secured by screws |43 on the rod 4| between the lugs |40. A series of rock-levers |42 are carried on the rod |4I, such levers being located in the spaced openings |44 between the series of lugs |40 (Fig. 5). The forward end |45 of the levers |42 are adapta,177,65c n ed to bear upon' the spring pressure blade I2 I (Figs. 4 and 10) throughout the length of the doctor blade 94, while the upper arms |46 are engaged by the slidable pins |41 (Figs. 1, 4 and 5) fitted Within the holes |48 drilled in the bar |31. Enclosed within the holes |48 are a series of compression springs |50, the forward ends of which bear against the rear endsof the pin |41 while the rear ends of the springs |50 are engaged by the tips of the adjusting screw-bolts |5| threaded into the rear ends ofthe holes |48. By this, mechanism a delicate pressure adjustment may be yieldingly made upon the doctor blade 94 throughout its width, by advancing or retracting the screw-bolts |5|,' the'springs 50 imparting a variable yielding pressure through the pins |41 and rock levers |42 on the forward margin of the pressure blade |2| that bears on the doctor blade 94 throughout its width (Figs. 4, 5 and 10).

Means are provided for reciprocating the doctor blade 94 with an even uniform speed in all parts of its successive cycles that are best shown in Figs. 1 and 9: The doctor blade carrying slidey bar 3 has pivoted thereto the cam-roller |52 that engages the grooved cam |53 of special formation to impart a uniform movement to the bar |3, which cam |53 is mounted on the short shaft |54 journalled in a pair of bracket bearings |55 secured within the cam casing |56 that is fastened to the casting 4| by any suitable means.

The shaft |54 carries the worm gear |51 that is actuated by the worm |58 fastened to the stub-shaft |59 journalled in the cam casing |56 (Fig. 9). The lower end of the shaft |59 carries universal joint member |609 to which is pivoted the shaft |6| within which is telescoped the shaft |62 which through the vslidable coupling |63 causes the shaft |6| to be rotated in any position depending on the relative positions of the ink fountain and associated devices on the arms 30 and 3 I.

The shaft |62 is pivotally connected by the universal joint member |64 to the shaft |65 that has keyed thereto the bevel gear |66. The bevel gear |66 is journalled in the bearing |61 on the standard |68 that is supported on the base I1. The bevel gear |66 meshes with the bevel gear |69 fastened to the end of the horizontal drive shaft |10 that is journalled in the standards 26 and |66 (Fig. 1). The outer end of the shaft |10 carries the gear |1| that is driven by the idler gear |12 which in turn is driven by the gear |13 secured to the shaft 25 which is driven from the power shaft 28 as hereinbefore described.

In Figs. 11-14, I have shown a modified form of my invention in which the doctor blade is located below the pressure chambers, which modication is substantially similar to that shown in Figs. 1-10 which has been hereinbefore described except that it is arranged to provide drainage of the surplus ink. Fig. 12. shows the different positions for the fountain and doctor blade on either side of the printing cylinder dependent upon the direction of rotation of such cylinder. In describing the construction shown in Figs. 11-14, the same reference numerals will be used to identify similar parts in the Figs. 1-10 construction, so far as possible.

Referring to Figs. 11, 13 and 14, to the irregularly shaped casting 4| are fastened the same end walls 42 and 43, and the casting 4| is also similarly mounted between the press frames I5 and I6. The forward end of the inner presuidy ink being under .pressure during its travel V 20 |84 to the outlet pipe |88. The surplus ink removed by the undershot doctor blade 84 passes above the lplate |18V through the series of channels I82 (Figs. 13 and 14) into the chambers |88 and then through the port |84 to the outlet pipe 25 |88; 'I'he arrows in Figs. 11, 13 and 14 indicate the direction of ink flow in this construction.

The doctor blade slidable bar I3 is held tothe casting 4| by the-series of screw-bolts ||5 that pass through slots ||4 and are tapped into the f casting 4| in the same ways as in the Figs'. 1-10 construction. However, I have provided compresysion, springs |85 coiled about the bolts ||5 be- `tween their heads and the washers ||6 to afford a yielding attachment to the casting 4|. Also -5 pivoted on the trunnions |21 is the clamping bar |31 that holds the doctor blade mechanism in position on the bar l|I3,'which bar |31 is removably held in position by the'screw-bolts |38 fastened into the cross-pin |28 with the bolts |38 maintained within the lugs |33 by the nuts |34 as in the Figs. 1-10 construction. The devices for holding and adjusting the position of the doctor blade 84, coupledwith the mechanism for VWariably adjusting the pressure along the width f the doctor blade' 84 are the same as the similar devices and mechanisms shown and described with reference tothe Figs. 1-10 construction and need not again be described in connection with the structures shown in Figs. 11-14. v

The several operations of the various different mechanisms and devices in my improved gravure press have already been described in conjunction with the separate descriptions of their structural details as embodied in the press. However, the genral operations may be summarized as follows: After the printing cylinder I8 has been installed in the press frames` I5 and I8 with its driving coupling connections with the power shaft 28, the swinging arms 38 and 3|' are located to suit the direction of cylinder rotation by means of the latchpins 32 that engage the press frames I5 and I6. Then the guide brackets 33 are raised or lowered on the arms 38 and 3| by the bolts 35 to accommodate for the 65 size of the yprinting-cylinder I8. The'ink fountain, particularly the elongated orince in the 1 pressure chamber 44, is thenadjusted to the peripheralfsurfac'e of the cylinder I8 approxi- .mately to' the positions as shown in Fig. 4, with throughout the 1ength of the doctor blade s4 asl has been hereinbefore described.

When the ink fountain anddoctor blade constructions carried by the cross-plate 48 that is fastened to the guide brackets 33 are brought into operative position, the slidable pipe connections through the telescoped pipes 83, 84 and |83, |84 are brought into position through the casting 8| rotating on the casting 18 and the casting 81 rotating on the casting 88 as has been heretofore described, the stuffing-boxes 85 and |86 permitting the pipe connections to be lengthened or shortened as required.

In like manner the shaft |54 with the cam |53 that reciprocates the doctor blade 84 is brought into position in setting up the ink fountain as set forth in the preceding paragraph, with the telescoped shafts |6| and I 62 adjustable through the coupling |63 and deriving their revolutions from the shaft |18. vthe cam-roller |52 on the bar ||3 imparting to the latter the reciprocatory movement for the doctor blade 94.

The liquid ink under pressure from the centrifugal pump in the casting 18 in the Figs. 1-10 construction -is forced against the peripheral surface of the cylinder I8 through the elongated orifice 48 and then escapes in all four directions around the edges of the plate 46 and 41 forming the orifice 48 as shown in Figs. 4 and 6. Above the plate 46 the surplus ink is removed by the doctor b1ade`94; the ink issuing below the plate 41 is caught by the under blade 95,- and both streams of surplus ink as shown by the arrows in Figs. 3 and 4 are collected in the chamber 99 and then returned to the reservoir 55 by the pipe connections heretofore described.

In the modified Figs. 11-14 construction, the liquid ink under pressure from the pump -is forced against the cylinder I8 through the elongated oriflce |16, and escapes in all four directions around the thin plates |11 and |18 (Figs.

11 and 13). 'I'he surplus ink is collected by removal from the cylinder I8 by the top plate |18 and undershot doctor blade 84, and is then returned by the channels |82 into the chambers |83 from which it flows through the port |84l and the outlet pipe |88 to the pipe connections that convey this ink back to the reservoir 55 as hereinbefore described. 'I'he arrows in Figs. 11 and 13 show the path of the liquid ink to and from the surface of the printing-cylinder I8.

Referring to Fig. 12, 4the cylinder I8 is shown as being rotated in either direction. -When rotating in a clockwise direction, the ink fountains and associated doctor blade devices will be arg ranged as shown in dot and dash outline, while the full line positions of these devices show their respective positions when the cylinder I8 is revolving in an anti-clockwise direction.

It` will be observed them very delicate ad- `iustment of pressure on the doctor blade 84 is obtained through the yielding control of the series of rock-levers |42 that bear on the spring pressure blade I 2| which coacts with the front edge devices shown more particularly in Figs. 6 and 7 with all surplusini returned to the reservoir for preservation and re-use. v

Furthermore I maintain a body of ink under inder I 8 with the body of ink preferably in contact with the design under pressure in a narrow solid stream longitudinally disposed along the cylinder' surface to forcethe ink positively -into the rdepressions of the design, with 'the surplus ink not taken by the design flowing away from body of ink under pressure, which surplus is then conveyed through a closed circulating system that includes the closed reservoir of ink 55 back 4to the body of ink that impinges in a continuous solid stream on the cylinder` surface.

In the mechanisms shown I use devices forming an elongated orifice or slot extending the length of the cylinder I8 for supplying ink under pressure to the ldesign on the cylinder. Such slotted member is positioned between the walls ofthe surrounding chamber that is also filled with ink, such member removing surplus :ink from the cylinder, chiefly on both longitudinal sides of such slotted member. Hence the volume of ink in excess of thatrequired for inking vthe cylinder is directed into the design not only to remove all dirt, ink residues and other foreign matter, but also to sweep out all air from 'the depressions in the design aswell as to displace the film of air carried on the surface of the rapidly rotating cylinder I 8;.

My invention, in its broadert aspects, is not limited to the particular construction and arrangement of the ink fountains, doctor blades and associated mechanisms including the pump and pipe connections as shown in the gravure printing-press villustrated in the drawings, since many changes may be made without departing from the main principlesof the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages in use. Furthermore my improvements may be embodied in gravure presses of various types where it is particularly desirable to secure delicate pressure adjustments for the removal of surplus ink as well as to secure the proper distribution ,of-A ink on the peripherally etched surfaces ofthe printing cylinders as wellas to prevent any escape of surplus ink and volatile-solvents usedtherein.

I claim as my'invention: 3' l 1. In a gravure printing-press, a printing cylinder, a reciprocatingdoctor blade coacting with said cylinder, anfindependent yielding reenforcing member bearing on said blade, and means for variably and yieldingly exerting pressure on said reenforcing member on spaced-apart portions thereof throughout its lengthi':

2. In a gravure printing-press, a printing cylinder, a reciprocating doctor blade coacting with said cylinder, an independent yielding reenforcing member bearing on said blade, and a series of spaced-apart spring-actuated rock-levers bearing on said-reenforcing memberI for exerting independently-controlled yielding pressure through spaced-apart portions of said reenforcing member invyielding contact on s aid doctor blade throughout its length whilethe press is in operation. 1

3. The method of rotary intaglio printing which comprises circulating ink through a system and maintaining a confined body of ink therefrom under pressure against a rotating printing cylinder to cleanse andink the design thereon..

4. Ihe method of rotary intaglio printing which comprises circulating ink through a closed system and maintaining a body of ink'therefrom underffconstant pressure against a rotating print-' ing cylinder to cleanse and inl; the design 'there-,f

n' "-f-ic. 5. The method of rotary intaglio printing which pressure against the moving intaglio printing cylcomprisescirculating ink in a closed system including a reservoir of ink forcing a body of ink from said reservoir underconstant pressure against the moving printing cylinder to cleanse and ink the design thereon, and returning surplus ink from the impact to the reservoir.

6. The method of rotary intaglio printing which comprises circulating ink in a closed system including a reservoir of ink, forcing a body of ink from said reservoir'in a solid stream under constant pressure against the moving printing cylinder 'to cleanse and ink the design thereon', and returning surplus ink from the impact to the reservoir.

7. The method of rotary intaglio printing which comprises circulating ink in a closed system, including a reservoir of ink spaced apart from the printing cylinder, forcing a body of ink from said reservoir in a solid stream under constant pres- -sure against the moving printing cylinder to I cleanse and ink the designs thereon, and returning surplus ink from the impact to the reservoir.

8. The method of rotary intaglio printing which comprises maintaining a body of ink under constant pressure directly applied as a solid body against a rotating printing cylinder and longitudinally thereof to cleanse and ink the design thereon, and forcing surplus ink to escape only at the outer edges of said body along and in contact with the cylinderl surface.

9. In the method of inking a rotary intaglio cylinder, the' step which consists in maintaining a confined body of ink in a flowing stream under pressure against the moving cylinder to cleanse and ink the design thereon while removing surplus ink therefrom at points spaced from said body in contact with the cylinder surface.

10. In'the method of inking a rotary intaglio cylinder, the step which consists in maintaining a confined body of ink in a flowing 'stream under pressure against the moving cylinder tof cleanse and ink the design thereon while removing sur-- plus ink ytherefrom at points spaced from said turning same to the body of ink.

11. In a gravure printing-press, a closed ink circulating system including4 means for maintaining a body of ink underconstant pressure against a moving printingcylinder to cleanse and ink the A design thereon, means for conveying surplus ink away from the cylinder, and means for returning the surplus ink to said body under pressure.

12. In a rotary gravure printing-press, a closed ink reservoir, a closed pressure system for conveying ink from said reservoir under constant pressure against a moving printing cylinder to cleansel and ink the design Vthereon and for thereafter returning the surplus ink to said reservoir.

13. In a rotary gravure printing-press, a closed ink reservoir, a closed system including means for conveying ink from the reservoir to a print-- ing cylinder and maintaining a body of ink in 2,177,656 the surfaceof the cylinder, the doctor and one v side of said member providing a passageway for ink flowing away from the cylinder.

15. An inking mechanism for a rotary gravure printing-press comprising an ink-confining member having a slot extending longitudinally of the printing cylinder and adjacent thereto through which slot ink under constant pressure is-forced Vagainst the moving cylinder to cleanse and ink the design thereon, a slottedchamber directly adjacent to the first slot to convey surplus ink from \said'cylinder, and a doctor for wiping the surface of the cylinder.

16. An inking mechanism for a rotary gravure printing-press comprising an ink-confining membei' having a slot extending longitudinally of the printing cylinder and adjacent thereto. means for maintaining a body of ink in said slot under constant pressure to cleanse and ink the design on said cylinder, a doctor for removing ink from the surface of the cylinder, the doctor and one side of the member providing a passageway for the ink flowing away from the cylinder, the slot and said passageway being substantially coextensive.

17. An inking mechanism for a rotary gravure printing-press comprising an ink-confining member having a slot extending 'longitudinally of the.

printing cylinder, means for maintaining a body of ink in said slot under constant pressure to cleanse and ink the design. on said cylinder, said slot being Aadjacent thereto for conveying surplus ink therefrom and a doctor for removing ink from the surface of the cylinder, the doctor forming o ne side of a slotted chamber directly adjacent to said slot.

18. In an inking mechanism for a rotary gravure printing-press, a chamber extending longitudinally of the printing cylinder and having an open side arranged against the cylinder, an ink supply member within the chamber having a slot extending longitudinally of the cylinder in substantially sealing contact therewith for maintaining a body of ink in'said slot under constant pressure to cleanse and ink the design on said cylinder, said member being positioned tosprovide an outlet between it and the chamber, and

means for supplying ink to the member.

19. In an inking mechanism for a rotary gravure vprinting-press, a chamber extending longitudinally of the printing cylinder and having an openv side arranged against the cylinder, an ink supply member within the chamber having a slot extending longitudinally of the cylinder` in substantially sealing contact therewith vfor maintaining a body of ink in said'slot underconstant pressure to cleanse and ink the design on said cylinder, said member being positioned within the chamber to provide outlets on either side of the member through which ink from the cylinder.

20. In an inking mechanism :for a rotary gramam flow vure printing-press,4 achamber extending lon-v means for supplying ink to the member and a doctor for wiping thesurface of the cylindenthe doctor forming a wall of the chamber.

2l. In a printing-press', a printing cylinder rotatable in either direction, means for forcing liquid ink in a solid stream under pressure against the surface of said rotating cylinder, said means being arranged radially to said cylinder, said inking means being shiftable to either side of the vertical diameter of said cylinder. l

22.- In a printing-press, a printing cylinder rotatable in either direction, an ink distribution device for forcing liquid ink in a solid stream under pressure against the surface of said rotating cylinder, said device being arranged radially to said cylinder and to be adjustable for cylinders of different sizes, said device being shift- 'able to either side of the vertical diameter of said cylinder.

23. In a gravure printing-press, a printing cylinder, an inking mechanism therefor comprising a receiving chamber for surplus ink coacting with a portion of said cylinder surface to form a seal, means for adjusting the position of said inking mechanism to accommodate for cylinders of different sizes while holding the sealing relation of said chamber in respect to the cylinder surfaces, said inking mechanismbeing shiftable to either side of the vertical diameter` of said cylinder for diierent directions of rotation thereof.

24. An inking mechanism for a rotary gravure printing-press comprising an ink-confining member having a slot extending longitudinally of, and adjacent to, the printing cylinder, means for maintaining a body of ink in said slot under constant pressure to cleanse and ink the design on said cylinder, an outlet chamber adjoining said slot for conveying surplus ink from the cylinder surface, a doctor for removing-.ink from lthecylinder, the doctor forming oney side of said outlet chamber, and a pump and conduits for supplying ink to and carrying ink from the member.

25. An inking mechanism for a rotary gravure A printing-press comprising an ink-conning member having aslot extending longitudinally of, and adjacent to, the printing cylinder, means for maintaining a body of ink in said slot under constant pressure to cleanse and ink the design on said cylinder, an outlet, chamber adjoining said slot for conveying surplus ink from the cylinder surface, a doctor for removing ink from the cylinder, the doctor forming one side of said outlet .chamber adjacent said slot, and a pump and conduits for supplying ink to and carrying ink from the member, said pump and conduits forming a closed pressure system for the circulation of ink.

26. In the4 method of inking a rotary intaglio cylinder, the steps which consist in maintaining a confined lbody of ink under constant pressure Vthe design thereon, while controlling thethickness of the ink nlm adhering to the cylinder,and

thereafter removing the ink film from the periph.'

eral surface of the cylinder at points spaced from said body of ink.

28. In a gravure printing-press, a closed ink circulating system including means for maintaining a conflned body of ink under constant pressure against a moving printing cylinder to cleanse and ink the design thereon, means associated with said last-mentioned means for restricting the thickness of the ink lm adhering to said cylinder, and means for removing the ink lm from the peripheral surface of the cylinder at points spaced from said body of ink.

29. In a gravure printing-press, a closed ink m circulating system including means for mainl CHRISTEN R. KADDELAND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US6516720Dec 20, 2001Feb 11, 2003Awi Licensing CompanyPrinting machines
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Classifications
U.S. Classification101/157, 101/366
International ClassificationB41F9/00, B41F9/06
Cooperative ClassificationB41F9/065
European ClassificationB41F9/06B3