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Publication numberUS2178770 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1939
Filing dateApr 6, 1938
Priority dateApr 6, 1938
Publication numberUS 2178770 A, US 2178770A, US-A-2178770, US2178770 A, US2178770A
InventorsZaisser William
Original AssigneeHarry S Walker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pulverulent dry compound for forming paints, plastics, and cements
US 2178770 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Nov. 7,1939 7 UNITED STATES:

PULVERULENT DRY COMPOUND FOR FORM- ING PAINTS, PLASTICS, AND CEMENTS William Zaisser, Woodside, N. Y., assignor of one-half to Harry S. Walker, New York, N. Y.

No Drawing. Application April 6,1938,

Serial No. 200,426

31 Claims. (Cl. 1os-'-s2) The present invention relates to an improvement in a compound, use-ful'for making paint, or for making plastic cementing compounds. In some of its forms, it may also beauseful in road 5 surface making.

One of the important, underlying features of the present improvement lies .in the provision of a base, or vehicle for the various aggregates .thathave been found useful, for wide varieties of application in this art, as will hereinafter be noted in detail.

The base above noted comprises'a pulverulent, dry, asphalt, bitumen or mineral pitch, into which is intimately mixed dry, pulverulent agl5 gregates or materials, either in single or compounded combinations, depending upon the use to which the compound may be put.

The volumetric proportions of the different, dry aggregates are varied, depending on the type of use, as desired, such variations being well within, and without destroying, the bonding power of'the base.

Another important feature is that the mixed compound, may, after dry mixing, be dispensed in its dry form in containers, for mixing with a liquid base solvent, or fluid by the user, as desired, .the'reby to liquefy the base', to act as a bond; and as thus dry dispensed, detrimental reaction is eliminated, the aggregates or materials having in their dry, pulverulent, comminuted, or shredded state, no detrimental reaction with the dry, pulverulent mineral pitch base.

One of the principal features of the herein improvement, is in the use of the dry powdered or comminuted aggregates, whereby to color, alter the nature of, or otherwise utilize the base as a vehicular bond, the use of said dry, variant and intermixed aggregates positively preventing the coalescing of the powdered mineral pitch or tar.

0 Thus the natural tendency of the powdered base when stored in containers, alone, to fuse into a solid body, is eliminated, the powdered mix being thus shippable and storable in its dry form until used. The prevention of coalescence of the dry 5 mix retains it in open, substantially porous con- .dition, whereby, when the user receives the contained dry mix, he maymix into it a suitable solvent, to reduce the aggregates to suchdesired consistency, or plasticity, as the use requires.

While any form of the present compound may be standard as to stated uses, its viscosity, when mixed with different volumes of solvent, may

vary from a thick, heavy non-flowing cementfito a free flowing liquid condition, whereby it may be brushed on, like-paint.

Where the compound is heavy and non-flowing it may be used as a weatherproofing crack filler, or on roofing and the like. When the compound is mixed with a greater amount of solvent,

it'may be brush-applied as a protective surface 5 coating.

The aggregates that ma be mixed with the pulverulent base, in addition to preventing the gregates, in addition to the foregoing noted phy sical functions also reduce the cost of the present compound, inasmuch as some of said aggregates are extremely low in price and are customarily sold in bulk form. Thus theag regate' formin 25 materials in many instances act also as fillers in addition to the other functions.

A list of the preferred forms of aggregates is given below, and while it shows the preferred materials, it does not exhaust the possibilities of- 30 use of other aggregate forming materials, not listed herein. a

The preferred aggregate-forming, filler materials in dry pulverulent or ground condition are as follows: 35

Y List #1 Alabaster Magnesite Asbestos Marble dust Alberine stone Plaster of Paris Cardboard Portland cement Cala stone Paper Cork Stone Cellulose Sawdust Diatomaceousearth Slate flour 46 Felt Steatite Ground. rubber scrap Sand Graphite Silica sand Hydrated lime Seasand Kaolin Talc Lime stone Wood flour Leather These various aggregates, or materials,jmay be powdered or shredded, according to their natures and desired functions. 55

- addition to color blending the same.

'A preferred list of dry, pulverulent bitumen coloring material is listed below, and it is to be understood that this list is incomplete, and not limiting in any sense, because of the obviously greater number of variations of colored materials that may be used, and are'available.

Many of the powdered metal oxides are useful in the present improvement, such as List #2 Cuprous oxide White lead Lime oxide- Zinc oxide Mercuric oxide also some of the colored and powdered earths are useful, such as List #3 Burnt umber Sienna Fullers earth Yellow ochre Other filler and coloring aggregates are useful,

when mixed in the base, for toxic insecticidal and bacteriacidal purposes, these aggregates performing the triple function of preventing coalescence of the base, coloring the same and preventing insect and bacterial attacks upon the objects coated with such toxic aggregates, these being noted, below, as follows:

List #4 Cuprous oxide Paris green Electric bronze Red lead Mercuric oxide that any single filler, color, or toxic aggregate may be selected and mixed with the bitumen base, or any predetermined combination ofaggregates from each of the four lists above out- 'lined, may be used, to suit varying known conditions. Such combinations may be prescribed, for utilizing the desired functional features of each aggregate. Further, such combinations, or-

ganic, and mineral, excepting hydrated, pow-,

dered lime, have no reaction with each other when dry mixed with the powdered dry bitumen or tar, nor have they any reaction with the dry pulverulent base. Where hydrated lime is used as a hardener, with color it is necessary to sewylect a lime 'proof color.

In some forms of the compound there may be required besides the powdered pitch base, a color blending, filler aggregate, such as a metal oxide, which may be red oxide, in sufficient volume to give the desired tone of red shade. Red oxide is inert and non-absorbent. A further filler aggregate desired may be of an absorbent nature such as ground wood, sawdust, or ground felt. After the inter-mixing of these selected aggregatesancl base, there remains a fiowable dry compound, which when packeted, remains in this condition for an unlimited period, ready for use, by the introduction of a solvent.

The user may furnish his own liquid base solvent, in desired quantities, to make a plastic cement, or a fluid brushable coating. Such solvents .may be turpentine, kerosene, gasoline,

naphtha, benzine, and similar volatile fluids, and

bitumen and hydrated lime, in proportions ofone part bronze powder (of any color) one part bitumen powder and" one part hydrated lime.

The lime is included to act the compound is applied.

The specific proportions above given may be varied, to meet encountered conditions, and the proportionate volumes of the base to the volume of the dry mix may vary from one part each{ of each aggregate, to one part powdered bitumen or pitch, to as high as fifty parts of each of the three elements of the compound. There is no hard and fast rule as to the proportions used because of the requirements of different colors, or tonal shades of each color desired, and the different functions and uses to be met.

It has been found that the introduction into the mix of talc gives the final compound, when used as a. paint, the propertyof smooth flowability and easy brush action. Ta1c,'or graphite, thus used, may be of any proportional volume to the volume of the powdered pitch used, as the use of talc or graphite changes the color of the final paint, and the volume of talc or graphite thus used, may be varied, for color as a hardener, after purposes up to the bonding power of the base.

Such volumes of talc or graphite and pitch may be varied from one part talc or graphite to sixteen parts of powdered pitch, or to fifty parts of each ingredient, depending on the color desired. .Moretalc or graphite makes the final paint extremely smooth to apply, causes the final paint, when dry to have a distinct sheen or gloss, which may be heightened by polishing or rubbing.

Talc is also included in the mix, where colors are used, such as colored bronze powders, dry pulverulent colors, metal oxides to lighten the colors from their base shade to the desired lighter tones. v

Where hydrated lime isused as an aggregate for hardening with a color, it is necessary to pack the dry mix in an air tight container, to prevent. atmospheric action on the lime, with a consequent degradation of-the contained color.

In mixes where color and hydrated lime is used with the powdered pitch or bitumen, the proportions of the aggregates may be twenty five to fifty parts of powdered pitch by volume, to fifty to seventy five 'parts by volume of an aggregate, of which twenty five to fifty percent of lime is included, the remainder of the aggregate constituting'twenty five to fifty, percent of coloring matter, including bronze powder.

The proportions, wherein a filler and color is used, may also be utilized, wherein the pulveru-. lent base of powdered mineral pitch may be used,

. from twenty five and fifty parts, by volume, and

hydrate of lime and twenty five to fifty percent of bronze powder.

In some forms, for paint, the volume of talc and dry pulverulent pitch may-be twenty percent talc to eighty percent pitch, which when mixed with a solvent of sufficient volume produces a protective brush coating of smooth nature and of a goodgloss.

Good color combinations, including bronze powders, where a coloring aggregate is used, are obtained by a combination of powdered pitch, color and talc, in one third parts of each, intermixed. Variations of the proportions of ingredients noted may be used up to the bonding power of the base pitch, thereby to'obtain changes in color.

An elastic, mastic crack filler is obtained by a mixture of ground rubber scrap and powdered pitch which may also include proportions of sand, ground leather scrap, ground felt, ground paper, ground cork, which enhance the elasticity of the mastic thus created and prevent the dry mix from coalescing, during storage.

Plastic mixtures of powdered pitch and Portland cement, and in some instances, a proportion of sand, form a satisfactory waterproof cement mortar, which may be trowelled on the surfaces to be protected, when admixed with a suitable proportion of solvent.

In road surfacing coatings, a mixture of sand and pulverulent pitch, dissolved in a suitable proportion of solvent, provides a good tractive surface. Other inexpensive aggregates or fillers may also be used for this purpose.

The proportions of aggregates of varying nature, either single, or in combination, may be used, as will be noted from the foregoing disclosure.- The viscosities, from paints to mastics,

or heavy plastic compounds, may be varied to suit the desired or indicated uses, this being accomplished by the use of properly proportioned solvents, more or less, as the type of material requires,

From the foregoing, it will be noted that the proportions and kinds of aggregates may be varied from one part aggregate to ninety nine parts of pulverulent pitch, and up to suflicient parts of aggregates up to the bonding power of the pulverulent pitch. a

' It is also obvious that the coating may be varied in color, nature and viscosity, as required, by the utilization of powdered, shredded or granular aggregates of different natures and functions, as mixed with the powdered pitch, for the purposes mentioned.

It is also to be noted that modifications may be made in the mixes herein noted, without departing from the spirit hereof or thescope of the appended claims.

This application is a continuation in part of my copending U. S. application No. 688,033 filed Sept. 2, 1933, for Dry compound for forming paints, plastics and cementsr I Having thus described the invention what is claimed is:

1. A dry, coating compound comprising a dry pulverulent'pitch, having a tendency to coalesce in storage, and a dry pulverulent aggregate admixed therewith, to prevent coalescence of the mix; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved-by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

2. A dry, coatingfcompound comprising a dry. pulverulent pitch, having a tendency to coalesce in storage, and a dry pulverulent aggregate intimately admixed therewith, said aggregate con--- s'tituting a mixture of a filler and a pulverulent color blending aggregate, said aggregate preventing the coalescence of the pitch; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and compltely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form-a freely flowing easilybrushable paint.

3. A dry, coating compound comprising a dry pulverulent pitch, having a tendency to coalesce in storage, and a dry pulverulent aggregate intimately admixed therewith, said aggregate coating the particles of the pitch to. separate said particles to prevent coalescence thereof, during storage; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable'paint.

4. A dry, coating compound comprising a dry pulverulent pitch, and a dry aggregate intimately admixed therewith, said-aggregate maintaining the admixed compound porous and preventing coalescence of the compound during storage; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely 'flowing'easily brushable paint,

5. A coating compound comprising a dry, powdered mineral pitch, the particles of which are segregated by a non-interacting pulverulent filler, to prevent coalescence of the pitch during storage; the pitch beingfinely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

6. A plastic forming elastic, crack filling com-. pound, comprising a dry, pulverulent pitch and an aggregate comprising, in part, a ground rubber scrap.

7. A paint forming compound, comprising a dry, pulverulent mineral pitch and a dry, color blending aggregate intimately admixed therewith; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quicklyand completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freelyfiowing easily brushable paint. a

8. An insecticidal ahd bactericidal coating compound, comprising a dry, pulverulent mineral pitch and a dry, powdered aggregate intimately admixed therewith, said aggregate comprising a toxic material.

9. A compound adapted to be admixed with a liquid toprovide a coating containing 25 to 50 parts by volume of powderedmineral pitch; and 50 to '75 parts by volume of an aggregate containing 25 percent to 50 percent hydrate of lime,

and 25 percent to 50 percent bronze powder, substantially as described; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

10. A compound adapted to be admixed with turpentine r the like whereby to provide at preservative coating, said compound containing 25 110-50 parts by volume of powdered mineral pitch; and 50 to '70 parts by volume of an aggregate mixed with the pitch and containing 25 percent to 50 percent shredded asbestos, said aggregate containing also about 25 percent hydrate bf lime, and 25 percent to 50 percent of bronze powder;

- the pitch being finely pulverized enough ,to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint. 1

l1. An article of manufacture adapted for dered material sealed air-tight therein and adapted to be admixed with an evaporable solvent to provide a flowable mass, said composition comprising 25 to parts by volume of finely powdered mineral pitch; and an aggregate intimately mixed with 'the pitch.

12. An article of manufacture adapted for shipment, storage and sale, comprising an airtight can; and a composition of dry powdered material sealed air-tight therein and adapted to be admixed with turpentine or the like to provide a flowable mass adapted to be applied as a preservative coating adapted to harden, said composition comprising 25 to 50 parts by volume of finely powdered mineral pitch; and 50 to parts of a dry powdered aggregate intimately mixed with the pitch; said pitch and aggregate, when dry being free of ailinity for, or interreaction with, each other; said aggregate being adapted to serve the multiple function of retaining the pitch evenly distributed throughout the composition and mechanically separating the particles of pitch during shipment to prevent the compacting of the pitch particles together during storage and shipment, and to retain the pitch particles separated for the easy access of the solvent thereto, and to give body to the flowable mass, and body and appearance to the final hardened product,

13. An article of manufacture adapted for shipment, storage and sale, comprising an airtight can; and a composition of dry powdered material sealed air-tight therein and adapted to be admixed with turpentine or the like to provide a flowable mass adapted to be applied as a preservative coating, said composition comprising 25 to 50 parts by volume of finely powdered mineral pitch; and 50 to 75 parts of an aggregate intimately mixed with the pitch and containing shredded asbestos, hydrate of lime and bronze powder; said pitch and aggregate, beingdry, being free of interreaction; said aggregate serving the multiple function of retaining the pitch evenly distributed and mechanically separating the particles of pitch during shipment to prevent the compacting of the pitch particles together during storage and shipment, and to retain the pitch particles separated for easy access of the solvent thereto, and to give body to the flowable mass, and body and color to the final hardened product.

t 14. A composition adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide'a mass suitable for filling cracks and making expansion joints, said composition comprising a binder material; and divided elasticfiller material mixed with the binder material.

15. A composition adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide a flowable: mass, said composition comprising fine y ,divided binder material tending to cake ,when unmixed; and divided filler material mixed with the pitch, the quantityof binder material being sufiicient to form a binder and continuous cover for the flowable mass; the quantity i of filler material being sufllcient. to prevent the binder material from caking; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing; easily brushable aint. p 16.'--A composition adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide a flowable mass or paint, said composition comprising finely divided pitch; and divided filleriinaterial mixed with the pitch; the

able cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

1'7. A composition adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide a flowable mass; said composition comprising 25'to 50 parts by volume of finely divided pitch; and divided filler material mixed with the pitch; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

18. A composition of dry powdered material adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide a flowable mass or paint, said composition comprising 25 to 50 parts by volume of finely divided pitch; and divided filler material mixed with the pitch; the quantity of pitch being sufficient to form a binder and continuous pitch cover for the flowable mass; the quantity of filler material being sufiicient to prevent the pitch from caking before mixing with the liquid; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by asuitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

19. A composition adapted to be mixed with a.

liquid to provide a flowable mass or paint, said composition comprising 'finely divided binderv and smooth flowability.

20.,A composition adapted to be mixed with a liquid to provide, a mass or paint, said composition comprising a pitch; and finely divided talc; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by a suitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint. a

21. A flowable mass or paint comprising a mixture of pitch, a liquid and finely divided talc, the quantity of pitch being suflicient to form a binder and continuous cover for the talc; the ta.'1c.50

being adapted to give to the mass or paint a gloss or sheen; the pitch being finely pulverized enough to be quickly and completely dissolved by asuitable cold solvent to form a freely flowing easily brushable paint.

22. A flowable mass or paint, comprising finely divided talc intimately mixed with a solution of pitch, the quantity of pitch being sufficient to form a binder and continuous cover for the talc; the quantity of talc being sufiicient to give to the mass or paint a smooth fiowabilityand a gloss or sheen which may be heightened by polishing. l

23. A composition 01' dry powdered material adapted to be mixed with a solvent to provide a flowable mass or paint, said composition comprising finely divided pitch; and finely divided talc intimately mixed with the pitch; the quantity of pitch being sufiicient to form a. binder and con tinuous cover for the tale, and a -continuous pitch cover' for the flowable mass and the structure to suflicient to prevent the pitch from caking' during storage and shipping, and to give to the mass g f or paint a smooth fiowability and a gloss or sheen which may be heightened by polishing.

24. A method for maldng paint, said method comprising intimately pulverized pitch and pulverized slippery material; and adding a suflicient quantity of a suitable solvent for the pitch to completely dissolve the pitch; the proportion of solvent material and material bein such that the pitch forms a binder and continuous cover for said material, and a continuous pitch cover for the fiowable paint and the structure to which it is applied; the slippery material giving to the paint a smooth flowability and a gloss or sheen.

; 25 A method for making paint, said method comprising intimately mixing pulverized pitch and pulverized talc; and adding a sufilcient quantity of a suitable solvent for the pitch to completely dissolve the pitch and render the paint freely fiowable and brushahle; the quantity of pitch being sufficient to form a binder and continuous cover for the talc, and a continuous pitch cover for the flowable' paint and the structure to which it is applied; the .quantity of talc being such as to give to the mass or paint a smooth fiowability and smooth brushability and a gloss or sheen.

26. A method for making paint, said method comprising intimately mixing pulverized pitch o and pulverized talc; and adding to the mixture a sumcient quantity of a suitable solvent for the pitch to quickly completely dissolve the pitch; the quantity of pitch being sufficient to form a binder and continuous cover for the talc and a continuous pitch cover for the fiowable paint and the structure to which it is applied; the quantity of talc being suflicient to prevent the pitch from caking before adding the solvent, and such as to give to the paint a smooth fiowability and such that the paint can have a gloss or sheen after polishing.

27. An easily flowing and brushable paint comprising intimately mixed powdered aggregate, mineral pitch and a solvent in which the pitch is completely dissolved; the quantity of solvent being such that the paint when cold is freely fiowable and brushable and the pitch gives good surface protection. a

28. An easily flowing, easily brushable paint 50 comprising intimately mixed finely divided aggregate, mineral pitch and a solvent in which the pitch is completely dissolved; the pitch and aggregate being such as are free of aflinity for or interaction with eachother when powdered and 55 dry; the quantity of solvent being such that the paint is freely fiowable and brushable; the proportion of pitch being such that the pitch causes the paint to give good surface protection.

29. An easily flowing, easily brushable paint comprising intimately mixed powdered aggregate and mineral pitch, and a solvent in which the pitch is completely dissolved the proportions of the pitch and aggregate being equivalent to 25 to 50 parts by volume of pulverized pitch to 50 to '15 parts of powdered aggregate; the pitch and aggregate being such as are free of afllnity for or interaction with each other when powdered and dry; the quantity of solvent being such that the paint is freely flowable and easily brushable.

30. A method of the class described comprising intimately mixing finely pulverized dry mineral pitch and a finely divided dry aggregate; said pitch and aggregate being substantially free from interaction; and intimately mixing the mixture with enough of a suitable solvent to completely dissolve the pitch and form a freely fiowable and brushable paint; said pitch'being finely pulverized to render it conveniently quickly soluble in the solvent when making the paint; the proportion of pitch to aggregate being such that the pitch causes the paint to give good surface'protection and said aggregate serves the function of mechanically separating the fine dry pitch par ticles before mixing with the solvent to prevent the compacting of the pitch particles together.

'31. A method of the class described comprising intimately mixing about 50'parts by volume of pulverized dry mineral pitch and about 50 parts of a dry aggregatein'cluding shredded asbestos and hydrate of lime; said pitch and aggregate being when dry free from interreaction; maintaining said mixture free of moisture; and then intimately mixing the mixture with enough of a suitable solvent such as turpentine to quickly completely dissolve the pitch and form a freely fiowable and brushable paint ready to be applied and hardened by evaporation of the solvent; said pitch being finely pulverized to render it conveniently quickly soluble in the solvent when making the paint; the proportion of pitch to a gregate being such that the pitch causes the paint to give good surface protection and said aggregate when dry serves the multiple function of retaining the pitch evenly distributed in the dry mixture before adding the solvent, mechanically separating the fine dry pitch particles to prevent the compacting of the pitch particles together before adding the solvent.

wmum zarssna. 7

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2424234 *Aug 7, 1943Jul 22, 1947Carey Philip Mfg CoCompositions for built-up roofing
US2490430 *Aug 7, 1943Dec 6, 1949Carey Philip Mfg CoComposition roofing
US2552947 *Aug 7, 1943May 15, 1951Carey Philip Mfg CoCoated roofing
US2578883 *Apr 29, 1948Dec 18, 1951Frick Otto Frans ValdemarPitchy composition and a method of making it
US2581640 *Aug 23, 1945Jan 8, 1952Carey Philip Mfg CoBituminous composition
US2610928 *Aug 7, 1943Sep 16, 1952Carey Philip Mfg CoMineralized bituminous roofing
US2761708 *Jan 29, 1952Sep 4, 1956Oglebay Norton And CompanyShaft seal for furnaces
US2805954 *Jan 12, 1954Sep 10, 1957Koppers Co IncBituminous composition
US2826507 *Aug 31, 1953Mar 11, 1958Phillips Petroleum CoBinder composition and method of preparing same
US2838414 *Jun 18, 1956Jun 10, 1958Claude J DunphyProtective coating composition
US2886459 *Jun 8, 1956May 12, 1959Patent & Licensing CorpBituminous coating compositions and articles coated therewith
US3958067 *Oct 3, 1973May 18, 1976Mitsuboshi-Sangyo Co., Ltd.Granular asphalts
US4168178 *Jan 30, 1978Sep 18, 1979Gaf CorporationAsbestos-free bituminous composition
US4168179 *Jan 30, 1978Sep 18, 1979Gaf CorporationBituminous composition
US4838939 *Dec 17, 1987Jun 13, 1989Nihon Tokushu Toryo Co., Ltd.Composition particularly adapted to damping sheets for vehicles
US5435842 *Aug 11, 1992Jul 25, 1995Cosmo Research InstituteVibration damping thick-film coating composition and method of forming the coated film
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/282, 106/284, 524/66, 524/59
International ClassificationC08L95/00
Cooperative ClassificationC08L95/00
European ClassificationC08L95/00