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Publication numberUS2179595 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 14, 1939
Filing dateJan 25, 1937
Priority dateJan 25, 1937
Publication numberUS 2179595 A, US 2179595A, US-A-2179595, US2179595 A, US2179595A
InventorsMcmanis John V
Original AssigneeMcmanis John V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Treating table
US 2179595 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. M, 1939. J. v. McMANlS 2,179,595

TREATING TABLE Filed Jan. 25,. 1937 IN V EN TOR,

A TTORNEY Patented Nov. 14, 1939 UNETEU STA'EES PATENT @FFHQE 3 Claims.

My invention relates to treating tables and more particularly to tables for use in manipulative treatments and diagnostic procedures, and is an improvement upon the treatment table forming the subject matter of Letters Patent No. 1,371,502 dated March 15, 1921.

One object is the provision of simple and efficient means of the character mentioned.

A further object is the provision of a table of the character mentioned having means for taking advantage of the recoil of a resilient table section to aid in diagnosing and treating varying degrees of impaired motion in joints and other tissues.

Another object is the provision of a resilient table section in conjunction with relatively firm table sections.

A still further object is the provision of a resilient table section and means for alternately pressing a patient against the resilient table section and releasing this pressure.

My improvement is embodied in the .apparatus illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. l is a plan View, Fig. 2 is a side elevation, and Fig. 3 is an enlarged section taken on line 3-3 in Fig. 1.

Referring more particularly to the drawing, a base ll or pedestal is provided with an upstanding cylindrical portion in which is mounted a piston 5. The piston 5 is held from rotary and vertical movements in base 4 by a set screw 6 having an adjusting handle 7. At the upper end of piston 5 is a head casting 6 cast integrally with or rigidly secured thereto. The head casting 8 has a bearing portion 9 in which is journaled a vertical shaft it. On the upper end of shaft I is fixed a block I! to which is pivotally mounted a frame I?! on a horizontal axis l3. Slidably mounted on the frame lll is an auxiliary table section M. An adjusting screw i is mounted in lugs on the underside of table M and threaded in a projection it on frame l2. The arrangement is such that by turning screw l5 by means of a handle H the table it can be adjusted longitudinally along frame l2.

On the lower end of shaft H] is fixed a block I9. A frame is pivotally mounted at one end to block IS! on a horizontal axis 2i. A connecting link 22 has one end pivoted at 23 to frame l2 and its other end pivoted at M to frame 28. A block 25 is slidably mounted on frame 29 and a screw 25 is threaded in block 25 and rotatably mounted in a block 2 so that rotation of screw 26 by means of a handle 28 will move block 25 longitudinally of frame 2!]. A tension spring 29 is connected to the axis l3 and to block 25 to resiliently sustain the table section id and its frame mounting. By turning crank 28 block 25 will be moved toward or away from axis 2! thereby effectively strengthening or weakening spring 29 to sustain different weights on table It. A link 36 is pivoted at 3! to frame l2 at its upper end and provided with a slot 32 at its lower end engaging a bolt 33 in frame 20. Bolt 33 is provided with a handled nut M for frictionally looking the lower end of link against frame 28 to prevent vertical swinging movement of table M on axis l3 when so desired.

A frame 35 has one end fixed rigidly on the head casting 8. On the frame 35 is an upstanding lug 36 to which is pivoted a main table section 31 on a horizontal axis 38 to permit vertical swinging of table 31. A bar 39 is pivoted as at M to the underside of table El and engaged between a cross pin 4| and a dog 42. The arrangement is such that Weight on table 3'! will press bar 39 downwardly against the pin 4i and dog 42 to lock said bar and hold table 31 at different inclinations.

An intermediate table 63 is mounted on a bracket 44 fixed on head casting 8. On the underside of table 43 is a shaft 45 in bearings 86. The ends of shaft t5 extend beyond the lateral edges of table 43 and carry rocker arms ll which are fixed on said shaft. One rocker arm 1 is provided with a depending lever 48 which is connected by means of a connecting link .9 to crank wheel 5!] on an electric motor 5!. The electric motor is preferably of the enclosed reducing gear type so that the rotation of wheel 56 will be fairly slow.

At each end portion of each rocker shaft 41 is a button 52. Two straps 53 have their ends perforated and engaging said buttons 52 so that when a patient is lying on table 43 straps 53 will pass over the patient and hold him tightly on table 43. Rotation of the motor will cause rocker arms 41 to rock and alternately tighten the pressure of one strap 53 on the patient and loosen the pressure of the other strap 53 on the patient. The straps may be made adjustable by means of ordinary buckles (not shown) or in any other manner.

Table 43 is made up of a solid base it with a plurality of coil springs 55 mounted thereon to easily yield under the weight of the patient. On the tops of springs 55 is a pad 56 of sponge rubber or other padding. A covering 51 is secured to base 54 and envelopes springs 55 and pad 56. Perforations 58 may be provided in the base 54 to allow the free flow of air into and out of the table section 43. The tables It and 3! are each provided with a solid base 59 similar to base 54. On the base of each of these sections is padding 60 which is relatively firm and of such material as sponge rubber, hair, felt or the like. Each padding 60 is enveloped in a protective covering GI similar to covering 51. Tables M and 3'! are relatively firm and table 43 is quite resilient.

In practice, the springs 55 are of such size and number as will normally maintain the cover 57 in distended condition while the table is unoccupied, so that the top surface of the intermediate section 43 is normally projected above the horizontal plane of the other table sections in such manner as to be free to partiallyyield under the weight of a patient who may be placed on the table. The springs 55 are so constructed and arranged that while the patient occupies the table and the top of the intermediate section is brought down to approximately the same plane as the tops of the other sections, the top of the intermediate section will be capable of further yielding movements and recoils therefrom in response to the application and removal of pressure applied to that portion of the body of the patient which is directly over said intermediate table, patient is placed on the table with the head usually on section 31 but the head may be positioned on the section Hi When desired. While the table is unoccupied the resilient intermediate section d3 extends higher than the normal horizontal plane of sections Hi and 3'! so that the portion of the patient over the section 43 is resiliently sustained. The patient may be positioned on the table with the head at different distances from section it to position different portions of the patients body over said section 43 as desired.

The pivotal mounting of the auxiliary table section It is such that said section may be swung laterally in either direction and also vertically in either direction, the combination of which movements produces circumduction. Said table section M is also sustained during its circumduction swinging movements by the spring 29, the tension of which is adjustable. It will be noted that the yielding character of the top of the intermediate section 43 and its location above the plane of the other sections possesses a decided advantage when the patient reclines upon the table because then the top surface of the intermediate section is in approximately the same horizontal plane as that of the other sections and this prevents any undue distortion of the body of the patient.

Should the patient recline face down with, say, the part of the mid-dorsal, lower dorsal or lumbar spine on the resilient intermediate section, the yielding resilience of the top of the latter feels remarkably comfortable to the patient and thus enables him to relax his body to a high degree. Obviously, the complete relaxation of the patients body is a very important result to secure and makes it much easier to diagnose the state of being in the spine. The finer restrictions, adhesions and limitations in spinal suppleness and motion are much more readily diagnosed. Relaxation of the patients body also enables the operator to give a much better treatment, said treatment is less diiiicult to give and does not require as much force as might otherwise be required.

Should the patient lie face down on the table as above suggested, with his chest on the main table top section 3'! and his lower back and pelvis on the swinging section it, then, as the auxiliary table top is lowered the patients body, due to the friction of the chest on the main table top section tends to remain there. Therefore, as the swinging leaf i l moves downwardly it produces an appreciable stretching effect upon the spine. This is especially true if the patient is asked to hold to the distal end of the main table top section. Hence, it will be seen that without any additional mechanical apparatus whatever, a splendid stretching effect upon the body, or rather the spine may be obtained. Therefore, as the leaf l4 descends, the spinal tissues are stretched and as it returns to its level position a production of relaxation is again obtained by reason of the resiliency of the top of the intermediate table section. Hence, alternate stretching and relaxation are produced. This effect is good to literally milk the stale blood and fiuids out of the body tissues in that area and to encourage the inflow of fresh nutrative material.

Again assuming the patient to be occupying the table face down, the operator, without moving the swinging leaf M at all may, by placing his hand upon the patients back, which is directly over th resilient intermediate table section, and by pressing down and then releasing the pressure produce a springing effect in the spinal tissue in that area. In this movement the recoil of the resilient mechanism which is incorporated in the upholstering of the intermediate section plays a very important part, and in fact this recoil effect could not be obtained in the absence of the resilient means to restore the body to its original position after displacement by the hand pressure above referred to. As has already been stated, the circumduction movements of the type produced by the swinging leaf l4 accomplish alternating stretching and relaxation effects. If at the time these stretching and relaxation effects are occurring there is alternate pressure downward upon the spine by the operators free hand, producing downward pressure and relaxing effects, a more comprehensive and complex movement is effected upon the spine. It is to be noted that the pressure made upon the spine by the operators free hand is made during the movement of the swinging leaf M, thereby bringing about alternating stretching and relaxing eifects in the spine as well. Hence, it will be seen that a very comprehensive and complex system of movements occur with a wide range of effects upon the tissues being stretched, and this treatment is of such a character as to permit a complete approach to the involved restricted tissues and prevents, or at least helps to prevent the overlooking of something that may be deeply hidden in the tissues.

I claim:

1. In a table of the character described, the combination of a pedestal, a main top section supported by pedestal, and an auxiliary top section also suppo' ed by said pedestal, of an intermediate section comprising a base also supportei by said pedestal, a di tensible cover having its edges attached to said base, a pad positioned within the cover opposite to said base, and resilient means located within said cover and interposed between the base and the pad, and reacting against both of them in. such manner as to maintain said cover in normally distended condition, the resilience of said distending means being such that said pad and the adjacent portion of the cover will partially yield under the weight of a patient occupying the table, and yet be capable of further yielding movements in the same direction, and recoils therefrom, in response to the application and removal of extraneous pressure upon the body of the patient.

2. A table of the character described comprising a base, a main top section supported by said base, an auxiliary top section supported by said base, an intermediate section supported by the base and interposed between the first mentioned sections, said intermediate section having a distensible top portion, and resilient means for yieldingly maintaining said distensible top portion in normally distended condition, the resilience of said distending means being such that it will partially yield under the weight of a patient occupying the table and yet be capable of additional yielding movements and recoils therefrom in response to the application and removal of pressure applied to the body of said patient, straps connected with said intermediate portion in such manner as to pass around the body of the patient, and means for intermittently applying tension to said straps in such manner as to effect alternating, yielding and recoiling movements to said distending means.

3. A table of the character described comprising a base, a main top section supported by said base, an auxiliary topsection also supported by said base and spaced from the main top section, an intermediate section also supported by the base and interposed between the first mentioned sections, said intermediate section having a top portion having incorporated within its upholstering a highly resilient compressible means, a rock shaft extended laterally across said intermediate section beneath said top portion, rocker arms on said rock shaft, straps connected with said rocker arms and adapted to pass over the body of a patient, and means for oscillating said shaft in such manner as to intermittently apply tension to said straps in such manner as to effect alternate compressive and recoil movements to said top portion.

JOHN V. MCMANIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2926660 *Apr 11, 1956Mar 1, 1960Clay Thompson JosephChiropractic table
US2941526 *Sep 26, 1958Jun 21, 1960Mott Willis FVibratory body stabilizer table
US3761081 *Feb 24, 1971Sep 25, 1973C SimmonsExercising device
US4649905 *Nov 1, 1984Mar 17, 1987Barnes James ECervically adjustable chiropractic treatment table
US4655200 *Feb 15, 1985Apr 7, 1987Intra Med Industries LimitedOrthopedic apparatus
US4726358 *Apr 9, 1986Feb 23, 1988World Products Pty. LimitedManipulative treatment device having pivoting links between base and supports
US4860733 *Sep 2, 1988Aug 29, 1989Parker Jr Alonzo EOscillating reclining chair
US5123916 *Jan 14, 1991Jun 23, 1992United Apothecary, Inc.Lumbar spine therapy device
US5158568 *Apr 30, 1991Oct 27, 1992United Apothecary, Inc.Lumbar spine therapy device
US5258019 *Jun 22, 1992Nov 2, 1993United Apothecary, Inc.Lumbar spine therapy device
US5282835 *Apr 28, 1992Feb 1, 1994Wright Howard SExercising table for applying cyclic movement with adjustable support members
US5320640 *Feb 28, 1992Jun 14, 1994United Apothecary, Inc.Continuous passive motion cervical spine therapy device
US5320641 *Jan 27, 1993Jun 14, 1994Riddle & Withrow, Inc.Computer controlled physical therapy device
US5500002 *May 23, 1994Mar 19, 1996United Apothecary, Inc.Continous passive motion physical therapy device
US7112215 *Apr 29, 2001Sep 26, 2006Shiyou XiaoDigitized control three-dimensional spinal orthopaedic device
US7314431 *Aug 12, 2005Jan 1, 2008Alexei KorotiaevVibrating device for stretching leg muscles
WO1986001099A1 *Aug 1, 1985Feb 27, 1986World Prod Pty LtdDevice for manipulative treatments
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/245, 601/26
International ClassificationA61G13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61G13/009
European ClassificationA61G13/00M