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Publication numberUS2181181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1939
Filing dateFeb 25, 1936
Priority dateMar 5, 1935
Publication numberUS 2181181 A, US 2181181A, US-A-2181181, US2181181 A, US2181181A
InventorsErnst Gerhard
Original AssigneeTelefunken Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Short wave reflector
US 2181181 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1939 E GERHARD SHORT WAVE REFLECTOR Filed Feb. 25, 1936 INVENTOR msr fif/QHARD BY y mu. ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 28, 1939 PATENT GFFICE SHORT WAVE REFLECTOR Ernst Gerhard, Berlin, Germany, assignor to Telefunken Gesellschaft fiir Drahtlose Telegraphic in. b. H., Berlin, Germany, a corporation of Germany Application February 25, 1936, Serial No. 65,614

In Germany March-5, 1935 Claims.

This invention relates to a new and novel reflector for short wave Work, especially of cowl or hemispherical shape.

The present invention is concerned with planer or more particularly curved reflectors for ultrashort waves. Untuned reflectors arranged in the form of a sheet or surface, say, in the shape of parabolic cylinders, paraboloids of revolution, or of hemispherical form are extensively employed in short wave work.

With a view to insuring proper concentration or focusing of the beam energy, the dimensions of the reflectors bear a definite relationship to the working wave length. For the wave lengths that come into consideration in practice, the relation between reflector dimensions and wave length is no longer negligibly small, and as a result the still useful reflector dimensions become relatively great. Reflectors of such large size become cumbersome and are attended with diiflculties whenever short Waves are to be used with portable equipment.

The reflector of this invention for ultra-short waves has this outstanding characteristic that the same consists of component parts, and that means are provided so that the constituent parts may be laid or assembled together in a simple and expeditious manner.

Reflectors as here disclosed offer the merit that they are manageable and transportable far more readily inasmuch as the constituent parts may be accomodated in boxes or other carrier means which can be easily handled and transported by one person, or can be shipped on small cars or vehicles without occupying much space.

A number of exemplified embodiments of the invention shall be described in more detail in what follows by reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a reflector;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a diagram showing a reflector of Figs. 1 and 2 located within an equipment box;

Fig. 4 is a detailed elevation of the spring clips for retaining two portions of the reflector together;

Fig. 5 is a section of Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is an elevation showing detachable junction lugs; and

Fig. 7 is a section of Fig. 6.

Figure 1 illustrates a revolution symmetric reflector having cap or hemi-spheric form. Around a center piece of planar form 2 are fitted, as shown by Fig. 4 and 5, by the aid of suitable twin clip-like spring members 6, four lateral or quadrantal planar pieces 4 one portion of the spring ciip members being fastened to the center piece 2, the other portion of said spring-like clip being fastened to members 4. The outer rim of the reflector is held together with readily detachable junction lugs 8, as shown by Fig 6 and 7. Whenever necessary, the dimensions of the reflector may be enlarged by further marginal pieces iii. In this connection it will often be found necessary to make the peripheral pieces so as to diminish the air resistance, and also to make all parts of the reflector with a View to minimizing weight, from apertured pieces of sheet or grate-like metallized fabrics (materials), the metallization being produced, for instance, by spraying. The holes indicated at l2 are intended to: show in What way apertures may be formed of any suitable shape and arranged in the marginal pieces it, say, by punching.

Figure 2 shows the same reflector in side elevation. The center piece 2 of the reflector is fixedly united with the outfit box or the case of the apparatus.

Figure 3 shows the equipment box I4 with the center piece 2. In order that the reflector and the antenna may be safeguarded from the chances of being damaged, a lid 16 is fitted over the open ends of the reflector.

The basic idea of this invention is useful not only in connection with the exemplified embodiments here shown and described. For instance, the constituent parts could be made ioldable by means of hinges or the like.

In cases occurring in practice where the re flectors are subject to severe shocks and percussions, for instance, caused by engines, etc., it will be recommendable to insulate adjacent reflector parts at their joints inasmuch as, if the contact between the component parts were imperfect or changing, the energy transmitted or picked up is likely to be subject to amplitude efiects or changes, and this would result in disagreeable scratching noises in the telephone receivers.

I claim:

1. A hemispherical shaped reflector for ultra short waves comprising a central portion, a plurality of separate detachable parts surrounding the outside periphery of said central portion, a plurality of spring members for securing said separate detachable parts to said central portion, and a plurality of junction lugs securing the outside rim of said detachable parts together.

2. A hemispherical shaped reflector for ultra short waves comprising a central portion, four separate detachable parts surrounding the outside periphery of said central portion, two spring members secured to each detachable part for securing said separate detachable parts to said central portion, and a plurality of junction lugs securing the outside rim of said detachable parts together.

3. A hemispherical shaped reflector for ultra short waves comprising a central portion, a plurality of separate detachable parts which are insulated from each other surrounding the outside periphery of said central portion, a plurality of spring members for securing said separate detachable parts to said central portion, and a plurality of junction lugs securing the outside rim of said detachable parts together.

4. A hemispherical shaped reflector for ultra short waves comprising a central portion, four separate detachable parts surrounding the outside periphery of said central portion, two spring members secured to each detachable part for securing said separate detachable parts to said central portion, a plurality of junction lugs securing the outside rim of said detachable parts together, and at least two other separate detachable parts surrounding said first mentioned detachable parts.

5. A hemispherical shaped reflector for ultra short waves comprising a central portion, four separate detachable parts surrounding the outside periphery of said central portion, two spring members secured to each detachable part for securing said separate detachable parts to said central portion, a plurality of junction lugs securing the outside rim of said detachable parts together, and at least two other separate detachable parts of metallized fabric surrounding said first mentioned detachable parts.

ERNST GERHARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2471828 *Jul 4, 1944May 31, 1949Skydyne IncParabolic antenna
US2534710 *May 8, 1946Dec 19, 1950Golian Serge EBuoy supported collapsible radar reflector
US2572430 *May 17, 1946Oct 23, 1951Breeze CorpAntenna structure
US2604595 *Sep 25, 1945Jul 22, 1952Standard Telephones Cables LtdAntenna reflector
US2761136 *Nov 28, 1945Aug 28, 1956Charles V RobinsonFull reverse roll throat scan horn
US2827629 *Apr 8, 1954Mar 18, 1958Raytheon Mfg CoAntenna supporting structure and method of assembly
US2997712 *Jun 14, 1957Aug 22, 1961Kennedy Donald SAntenna reflector construction
US4455557 *Jun 2, 1982Jun 19, 1984John ThomasDished reflector and method of making same
US4568945 *Jun 15, 1984Feb 4, 1986Winegard CompanySatellite dish antenna apparatus
US4647943 *Mar 29, 1985Mar 3, 1987General Instrument CorporationMesh dish antenna and hub
US4761655 *Nov 29, 1985Aug 2, 1988British Telecommunications PlcTransportable antenna for an earth station
US4766443 *Oct 25, 1985Aug 23, 1988Winegard CompanySatellite dish antenna apparatus
US4780726 *Dec 3, 1984Oct 25, 1988Trw Inc.Depolyable reflector
US4916459 *Mar 16, 1987Apr 10, 1990Hitachi, Ltd.Parabolic antenna dish
US6215453 *Jan 13, 2000Apr 10, 2001Burt Baskette GrenellSatellite antenna enhancer and method and system for using an existing satellite dish for aiming replacement dish
WO2000055941A1 *Mar 14, 2000Sep 21, 2000Burt Baskette GrenellSatellite antenna enhancer and method and system for using an existing satellite dish for aiming replacement dish
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/916, 403/345, 343/897, 343/872
International ClassificationH01Q19/12, H01Q1/00, H01Q19/10
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/005, H01Q19/12
European ClassificationH01Q19/12, H01Q1/00D