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Publication numberUS2181386 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1939
Filing dateMar 8, 1939
Priority dateMar 8, 1939
Publication numberUS 2181386 A, US 2181386A, US-A-2181386, US2181386 A, US2181386A
InventorsJoseph Vanore
Original AssigneeJoseph Vanore
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Picker stick buffer for looms
US 2181386 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV. 28, 1939. 1 VANORE 2,181,386

PICKER STICK BUFFER FOR LOMS Filed March 8, 1959 INVENTCR, Jbmp )L )fa/n0 rl;

ATTORNEY.

Patented Nov. 28, 1939 UNITED, STATES lRAJIIEINII @FFME vPICKER STICK BUFFER FOR LOMS Joseph Vanore, Haledon, N. J.

Application March 8, 1939, Serial No. 260,487

7 Claims.

In order to check the picker of a loom at the end of each forward stroke it is usual to employ a buffer consisting of a strip of heavy leather bent back and forth upon itself and having its several folds Vor laps penetrated by the rod on which the picker is guided, Such a buffer serves well enough to cushion the blows cf the picker but it can only withstand the violent action to which it is subjected fora comparatively short time, after which it is without the necessary resiliency and has to be replaced with a new one. One object of this invention is 'to provide a resilient `buffer for the picker which shall remain serviceable both as to wear and as to .resiliency practi-y cally indei'lnitely. f I

Another object is to provide for so mounting lthe rod on which the picker slides and the buffer is mounted that when it loosens. as must inevitably be the case when, as usual, it is not integral with what supports it and in view of the friction andvibratory action to which it is constantlyv subjected, it may be,v tightened. Ordinarily there is no expedient for tightening the rod, and looseness of even the slightest degree soon becomes so appreciable that the picking motion is inaccurate, necessitating the removal and repair or replacement of the entire rod-containing structure.

In the drawing, i

Fig. 1 is a rear elevation of a shuttle-box and picking means and including the present improvements;

Figs. 2 and 3 respectively show the picker and its guiding rod in rear elevation and. top plan;

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4, Fig. 3; and I Figs. 5 and 6 are respectively a face View and section of one of the spring abutments.

Supporting structure for the rod on which the picker slides is aiorded, as usual, by a wall I back of the shuttle boxes and provided with a horizontal slot 2, as usual, to receive the picker 3 reciprocated by the picker-stick 4. The back wall joins two uprights or supports 5 and The picker is penetrated and guided by a horizontal rod 1 formed and mounted thus: Y

One end of the rod is reduced at 'Ia and is set in a socket 5a in upright 5. The other upright has a bore 6a into whose enlarged outer end. is

screwed a nut 8 which in turn has screwed into it a screw 9. The rod is entered through bore 6a, with the nut removed, its reduced end being entered into the socket, whereupon the nut and screw being positioned as shown,` the screw is screwed against the rod to -hold it fast. If by the motion of the moving parts the rod in timev a spring, two block-like elements or blocksl y designated a and b` in Fig. 1 and having a spring between them and movable together and having .10v

bores to be penetrated by the rod and each block having at least one projection extending toward and lapped by'a projection of the other block and the projections having means to limit the motion of the blocks apart; in the preferred form 15 there are rtwo pairs of lapping projections and `further the lapping is an incident of forming the projections in the pair extending from one block bifurcated-and receiving the projections of the other block. In the example here shown the buffer is specifically formed as follows:

To form the blocks, layers of raw-hide having generally the form shown in Fig. i are used, i. e., one being elongated Aand the other generally U- Shaped. 2,5

For whatis here the block a there are four of the U-shaped layers, as III, and two of the .elongated layers, as II, they being all disposed in laminated arrangement with the two layers I I between pairs of the layers II). They are all so 30 arranged that the resulting block itself has a generally U-shaped form. Alll the layers are held together by rivets I2, two of which penetrate the portions Ita of the layers I0 which, being the terminals of the U of 'the block, constitute its projections, each in this case bifurcated as shown in plan by Fig. 3.

For what is here the block b there are ,used two of the U-shaped layers, as lli, and four of the elongated layers, as I5, they` being all disn posed in laminated arrangement with the two layers IlIbetween pairs of layers I5. They are all so arranged that the resulting block has a generally U-shaped form. All the layers are held` together by rivets I6, but in this case the portions 45 I4a, of the layers I4 which, being the terminals of the U of the block, constitute its projections, have longitudinal slots Il; these projections are non-bifurcated, forming tongues to be received by the bifurcated projections Illa of the other 5o block.

In the assembled state of the blocks the pro-` jections Ma, of the one block are received by and in that sense lap the bifurcated projections lila of the other block, as shown, the rivets exist 55 ing in the latter projections p-enetrating the slots I1 and thus limiting the movement of the blocks apart and giving the whole the character of a unitary structure.

Parallel with and between their projections the blocks have alined bores i8 and concentric with the bores and between the blocks is a coiled spring I9 which bears at its ends against abutment elements seated against the blocks.

'I'he buier is assembled with the rod so that the latter penetrates its bores I8, the spring and the abutment elements. The buier is sufciently close to the back wall of the box-structure so as to be confined to the upright position shown in Fig. l. In order to confine the buffer against movement lengthwise of the rod, a washer 2l is placed on the latters reduced end, abutting the shoulder at 7b, so that when the rod is held fast by screw 9 the washer acts through the righthand abutment element and coacts with the upright 5 to clamp the right-hand buffer block and hence the buffer. I

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim is:

1. A buier for the picker of a loom comprising a pair of members movable together and apart and each having a portion projecting toward the other member, said portions being wholly lateral of and in wiping Contact with each other, means, extending through said members transversely of their movement, to maintain the members with said portions in such contact with each other, and resilient means interposed between and yieldingly opposing movement together of the members.

2. A buier for the picker of a loom comprising a pair of members movable together and apart and each having a pair of spaced portions projecting toward the other member, the portions of each pair being wholly lateral of and in wiping contact with the respective portions of the other pair, means, extending through said members transversely of their movement, to maintain the members with said portions of the two pairs in such contact with each other, and resilient means interposed between and yieldingly opposing movement together of the members.

3. A buer for the picker of a loom comprising a pair of members movable together and apart and respectively having projections eX- tending lengthwise of the members and toward each other, one of said projections having a bifurcation receiving and tting the other projection, and a resilient element interposed between and yieldingly opposing movement together of said members.

4. The buier set forth in claim 3 characterized by its said members having means to limit their movement apart.

5. A buffer for the picker of a loom comprising a pair of members movable together and apart and respectively having pairs of spaced portions extending lengthwise of the members, said pairs extending toward each other and two of said portions having bifurcations and the other two being received in and tting the respective bifurcations, and a resilient element interposed between and yieldingly opposing movement together of said members.

6. In combination, with the picker-guiding rod of a loom anda support from which the rod projects, a pickerl buffer comprising a pair of generally U-shaped members penetrated by the rod and having their extremities projecting toward each other, and a coiled spring also penetrated by the rod and interposed between said members and their projections.

7 In combination, with a pair of spaced supports, one having a bore and the other a socket alined with the bore, a loom picker guiding rod entered through the bore and having its entering end received by the socket and also having a shoulder near the second support, and a buffer on the rod having a portion to be clamped between the shoulder and second-named support, the rst-named support having means to urge the rod toward the second-named support and thereby clamp said buffer portion between the shoulder and said second-named support.

JOSEPH VANORE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2747859 *Jan 4, 1954May 29, 1956Rager Donald MSpring buffers
US4171713 *Apr 20, 1978Oct 23, 1979Sulzer Brothers LimitedAbutment mechanism for a moveable drive member of a weaving machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/167
International ClassificationD03D49/00, D03D49/38
Cooperative ClassificationD03D49/38
European ClassificationD03D49/38