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Publication numberUS2181420 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1939
Filing dateOct 8, 1937
Priority dateOct 8, 1937
Publication numberUS 2181420 A, US 2181420A, US-A-2181420, US2181420 A, US2181420A
InventorsHerbert A Everest, Harry C Jennings
Original AssigneeHerbert A Everest, Harry C Jennings
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Folding propulsion wheel chair
US 2181420 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1939. H. A. EvEREsT r-:r AL i 181,420.

FOLDING PROPULSION WHEEL CHAIR Filed 001;. 8, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet l Nov. 28, 1939. H. A. EVEREST Er AL 2,181,420

v 4 FOLDING PROPULSION WHEEL CHAIR Filed oct. a, 1957 2 sheets-sheet 2 Azz-@NH3 Patented Nov. 28, 1939 PATENT OFFICE e FOLDING PEOPULSION WHEEL OHAIB Herbert A.

13 Claims.

Our invention in this application refers particularly to the construction of a folding wheel chair with the propulsion device for operating driving wheels. This application may be considered a! a further development of our patent application for Folding wheel chair, Ser. No. 63,340, filed February 1l, 1936,'matured to Patent No. 2,095,- 411, date, October 12, 1937. In the former application We disclosed the construction of a folding wheel chair with small diameter front drive wheels with a propelling mechanism which might be operated by the occupant of the chair. -In the ordinary type of wheel chair which may be propelled by the occupant there are two quite large front wheels, the tread of which projects considerably forward of the chair proper and 4the legs of the occupant and therefore prevents the occupant from approaching closely to a table, desk or couch and many other places where he may desire to move. The advantages of having the small diameter front wheels therefore permit the chair to be rolled close to any article of furniture and facilitate the use of lsuch achair for an occupant shifting to and from an automobile.

One of the objects of .our present invention is in the combination of a rigid side frame for each side of the chair with the small driving wheels Ymounted on a suitable axle. The drive is by means of pulleys in ,which the driving pulley is preferably actuated by a hand operated wheel, there being one on each side of the chair and adjustably mounted to regulate the tension on the belt or a drive sprocket chain.

Another object and feature of our invention as it relates to either operating the chair by the occupant or by an attendant involves a latching construction to lock the rear caster wheels in direct iront to rear alignment so that the chair may only move in a straight line direction. This facilitates the movement of the chair by the occupant through short distances and also facilitates an attendant moving the chair with an occupant up and down steps, curbs or the like in that the swivelling action of the casters is prevented and the chair may be tilted on the two rear wheels which then act as if they were rigidly connected to the frame. Another detail feature of our invention to facilitate the occupant using the chair close to articles of furniture or the like involves movable foot rests each attached to its own side frame of the chair and which may be positioned horizontally as a foot rest or raised vertically to allow the occupant to place his feet on the floor and thus shift the chair or stand up if desired. This employs a folding brace holding Everest and Harry C. Jennings,

Los Angeles, Calif.

1937, Serial N0. 167,986

(Cl. 28B-250) the foot rests in their operative position and a friction means to retain these in any desired folded position.

Our invention is illustrated in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation showing the relative position of the seat and the bottom when in use, one half of the foot rest however being illustrated as in an elevated or out of the way position.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of onev of the rear caster wheels in its locked position for straight line movement.

Fig. 3 is a partial section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2 in the direction of the arrows showing the yoke of the caster wheel in position for latching.

Fig. 4 is a view of one of the foot rests in the elevated position partly broken away to illustrate the friction retainer.

Fig. 5 is a front elevation of part of the frame showing one of the folding foot rests.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged elevation of the central pivotal connection of the diagonal braces connecting the two side frames of the bar.

Fig. 7 is a detail section on the line 'I-1 of Fig. in the direction of the arrows showing the adjustable clamp for the driving pulley wheel.

Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the frame with the wheels removed.

Fig. 9 is a front elevation of the chair the folded position.

Fig. 10 is an, elevation showing part of the frame and the propulsion drive for the front wheels.

Referring first to the construction of the frame and particularly to Fig. 8, there are two side frames designated by the numeral I I in which we employ a front post I2, aback post I3, these preferably being made of metal tubing. The arm rest I4 is connected to the front post by the angular bend I5 and attached to the rear post at the point I6. A rigid intermediate bar I1 connects the front post and the rear post it being rigidly connected thereto. This is also formed of tubing. A rear bottom bar I8 is joined to the bottom of the rear post I3 and extends rearwardly thereof and is secured to an arcuate brace I9. This brace is attached to the rear post I3 preferably in alignment with the intermediate bar I1 and is connected to a hollow caster socket 20. A portion 2| of the brace above the socket is vertical to accommodate the spindle of a caster wheel, etc.

The front bottom bar assembly includes a T branch tube 26 formed integral with the front post I2 adjacent its bottom and an L tube 21 at-` 55 `when in tached to the lower end portion 28 of the rear bar I8. A bearing tube 29 is tted in the T 28 and thei` L 21 and rigidly secured thereto by screws 38. A handle bar 33 is secured to each of the rear posts I3 by screws 34 or the like and has a handle grip 35. Extending forwardly from adjacent the lower end of the front post I2 there is a pivot rod 48 for the foot rest and projecting sidewise from the post I2 adjacent the bottom is the axle 4I for the front wheel.

The diagonal frame assembly designated by the numeral 45 includes a lower sleeve 46 mounted on the rod 29 and having a snug ilt between the T 26 and the L fitting 21. A diagonal brace 41 extends upwardly from each sleeve 46 being rigidly connected to the sleeve and has an upper longitudinal tube 48. In each of these tubes there is an inner bar 49 illustrated as being hollow and secured in position by bolts 58 which bolts also hold the fabric 5I which forms the seat and extends crosswise of the bar between the longitudinal tubes 48. Mounted on the ends of the rod 49 which projects beyond the ends of the tube 48 there is a front and a rear tube end 52 and 53, each of which has an open jaw end 54 partly encircling the front and rear posts I2 and I9 to direct the sliding movement in folding or collapsing the chair or extending this for use by spreading the side frames apart. By this construction it will be seen that the sleeve 46 rotates on the rod 29 in extending the side frames of the chair from the position of Fig. 9 to the extended position and vice versa. The tube 48 with the internal rod 49 develops a slight rotary action by the end pieces 52 and 53 having a straight vertical sliding motion on the posts I2 and I3.

In order to connect the two frames to provide a sumcient rigidity, yet to take care of a swivelling action, we employ a single pivot bolt assembly 68, note Figs. 6 and 8. This uses a long bolt 6| which passes with a close fit through perforations 62 in each of the diagonal braces 41. This bolt 6I is made of suilicient length so that the head 63 may engage one of the diagonal braces and the nut 64 be spaced from the other diagonal brace to provide a compression spring 65 reacting between the nut and the adjacent brace, the tension on the spring together with the reaction of the bolt therefore urges the two diagonal braces towards each other but allows sufiicient play or working of the braces for a purpose more fully detailed hereunder.

The driving wheel assembly 18, note particularly Figs. 1 and l0, includes a small supporting wheel 1| mounted on the axle 4| for each frame, the wheel being on the outside of the frame and having a driven pulley 12. An adjustable clamp 13, note Figs."'7 and l0, includes two semi-circular clamp jaws 14 connected together by bolts 15. The upper bolt has an axle extension 16 on which is rotatably mounted the operating wheel 11 which wheel has the driving pulley 18 secured thereto. These pulleys are preferably designed to employ a V shaped drive belt 19. It will however be understood that sprocket wheels and sprocket chain may be utilized. It is to be noted that the clamp 13 is directly mounted on the intermediate bar I1 and is thus always a xed distance from the traction wheel but the whole assembly of the operating wheel 11 and its pulley 18 may be adjusted longitudinally on this bar I1 to take up the slack of the belt or to make adjustments in this. It will be noted that the operating wheel has a peripheral rim 88 readily grasped by the hands of the user of the chair. This is approximately in the lsame position relative to the seat of the chair and to the arm rests as the har/1d grasp of a large wheel where the chair is provided with large wheels.

The rear or caster wheel assembly 85 preferably employs a wheel 86 of the same diameter as the traction wheel 1|. All of these Wheels are preferably provided with rubber tires. A swivel spindle yoke 81 forms a mounting for the axle 88 of the swivel Wheel and a swivel stem 89 extends upwardly in the swivel socket 28 and the portion 2| of the brace I9, this being a usual construction, the caster swivel connection being such that this wheel assembly is properly secured to the frame of the chair on each side, the yoke being slightly inclined as regards the stem 89, the caster wheel follows in the direction of the turn of the chair and the movement of the chair. The locking assembly for each caster Wheel designated by the numeral 98 employs a U shaped yoke 9| for each wheel, the yoke arms being rotatably mounted on the axle 88. The cross end 92 of the yoke has a notch 93 which engages an adjustable headed pin 94 which is secured in a plug 95 connected to the rear end of the L fitting 21. There is a friction fit of the arms of this yoke on the axle so that this yoke may occupy the upright position shown in Fig. 1, for instance when a chair is being moved in a forward direction. However to lock the caster wheels these wheels are swivelled to occupy the position of Fig. 2, the yoke 9| is rotated on the axle 88 until the notch 93 engages the head of the pin 94. This locks the 'caster wheels in a straight front to rearward position and preferably in direct alignment with the traction wheels, thus the chair can only move in a straight line direction forwardly or rearwardly. On account of having the caster wheels locked, an attendant may readily move the chair with its occupant up or down steps or a curb or over'or past various obstructions which would be difflcult to move the chair if the caster wheels were not locked.

The foot rest assembly |88, note particularly Figs. 4 and 5, employs two distinct rests both constructed the same. Each has a foot board I8| with a U shaped plate |82 secured thereto at one end and encircling the foot rest pivot rod 48. A folding brace |03 has'an upper section |84 pivoted at |85 to the post I2 and a lower section |86 pivoted at |81 to the oor board, these sections being pivotally connected by a central pivot |88. This brace may then fold to allow the foot rest board to occupy the horizontal position of Fig. 5 or the vertical positions of Figs. l and 9. A friction device ||8 employs a recess III in the foot board, this having a friction plug ||2 fitted therein and pressed outwardly by a compression spring II3. The plug bears against the foot rest rod 48 and thus develops a frictional' resistance, holding this in its upright position.

It will be noted by the position of the foot rests that these are quite close to the ground. Their pivot rods are positioned below the axle 4| of each of the traction wheels. The tread` or tire of these Wheels does not project forwardly of the line of the foot rests. Therefore a chair of our construction with the occupant therein may be moved close to an article of furniture, that is, until the foot rest or the feet of the occupant engage'such article. This brings the seat of the chair close to such article of furniture or for instance the side of an automobile so that the occupant may readily shift from the chair. It also vI2. boss or similar piece |20, note Fig. 5, which forms The latching yoke 9| is in such a position that the.

occupant of the chair may reach downwardly and latch or unlatch this device to clamp the caster wheels or to unclamp these for the ordinary movement of the chair. The back H5 of the chair is formed of` fabric, the sides being connected to the two rear posts I3. It will howevner be understood that a removable back such as described in our prior patent application may be utilized.

The axle assembly 4I has the axle for the traction wheel removably attached to the front post The assembly employs a substantial tubular a reinforcement for the tube I2 and projects slightly on the outside of the tube. The axle 4I extends through this boss and is secured by a nut |2| on the inside of the post, note Fig. 10.

The somewhat loose connection at the single pivot bolt assembly 60 of the diagonal braces 41 allows a twist or warp of the two side frames of the chair when the wheels 'on one side for instance meet an obstruction or depression. This allows the traction wheels to always maintain a suiiicient contact with the surface over which the -chair operates so that the occupant may have sufficient traction to ,propel the chair manually where an attendant is not wheeling the chair.

On account of the diagonal braces 41 being nor-A mally spaced apart, this warpingperrnits the two braces to approach until they contact and they may also spread apart a greater distance permitted by the length of the pivot bolt 6I and the spring 65. Of course this warping or twisting of one side of the chair relative to the other does not permit the chair to operate over large obstructions or depressions but it is quite satisfactory for those usually encountered in the ordinary use of the chair. On account of the long sleeves 46 and 48 on the end of the diagonal braces and the close fitting connection which prevents a longitudinal sliding of these sleeves on their supporting rods, the chair has sufficient stillness while developin the flexibility substantially equal to that of he chair of our patent application and patent above mentioned.

Various changes may be made in the details of the construction without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.

We claim: v i

l. A wheel chair comprising in combination two side frames each having. a front and rear post,` a bottom bar assembly with a connecting means therefor to both posts for each frame, a lower sleeve rotatably mounted on each bottom bar assembly and restricted from longitudinal sliding, an upper longitudinal tube, front and rear tube ends rotatably mounted on each upper tube and slidably engaging the front and rear posts, a single diagonal brace extending between the sleeve on one frame to the longitudinal tube on the other frame, a single pivot bolt connecting the two diagonal braces, the said bolt .being of sufficient length to allow relative longitudinal movement on the bolt of the said braces, a pivot rod connected to each side frame and extending forwardly, a foot rest board pivotally mounted on each pivot rod, a folding brace connecting'each board to the adjacent frame wherebyY the board may occupy a horizontal position to support an occupants feet or be folded to an upright position for collapsing of the chair.

2. A wheel chair'having rigid longitudinally extending side bars one on each side, a small traction wheel mounted on each side of the chair in a forward position,'an operating wheel having an adjustable mounting on a longitudinal side bar, there being an operating wheel on each side of the chair and a driving connection from each operating wheel to each traction wheel.

3. In a wheel chair having a swivel caster wheel with an axle, a swivel yoke mounted on the axle, an interengaging means on a portion of the chair to latch the said yoke to position the caster wheel in a straight line front to rear position relative to the chair.

4, In a wheel chair having a pivot rod positioned horizontally, a foot rest board pivotally mounted on said rod, said board having a recess, a friction plug and a spring in the recess, the plug engaging the rod, and a folding type of bracket connecting the board to a part of the chair whereby the board may be -retained in a horizontal position by the said bracket or retained in a vertical position by the actionof the friction plug on the pivot rod.

5. A wheel chair'having two similar side frames with a connecting structure to retain said frames a xed distance apart for operation as a chair and with a seat mounted between the frames, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame and projecting forwardly of the seat, whereby the occupant may rest his feet on such boards or displace the boards to propel the wheel chair by the feet, a small diameter traction wheel mounted in a fixed position on each side frame with the forward portion of the periphery of the wheel spaced rearwardly from the front of the foot board, a' caster swivelly mounted on each side frame at the rear portion thereof, an operating wheel secured to each vside frame in 'a position to be grasped by the hand of the occupant of the chair, and a drive connection from the operating to the traction wheel on each side.

6. A wheel chair having two similar side frames with a connecting structure to retain said frames a xed distance apart for operation as a' chair and with a seat mounted between the frames, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame and projecting forwardly yof the seat, whereby the occupant may rest his feet on such boards or displace the boards to propel the wheel chair by the feet, a small diameter traction wheel mounted in a xed position oneach side frame with the forward portion of the periphery of the wheel spaced rearwardly from the front of the foot board, a

caster swivelly mounted on each side frame at Athe rear portion thereof, an operating wheel attached to each side frame by a longitudinally movable attachment for a direct front to rear movement whereby the operating wheel may be positioned to be conveniently grasped by an occupant of the chair and a drive connection from the operating wheel to the traction wheel.

'7. A wheel chair having two similar side frames with a connecting structure to retain said frames a fixed distance apart for operation as a chair and with a seat mounted between the frames, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame and projecting' forwardly of the seat whereby the occupant may rest his feet on such boards or displace the boards to propel the wheely chair by the feet, a small diameter traction wheel mounted in a fixed position on each side frame with the forward portion of the periphery of the wheel spaced rearwardly from the front of the foot board, a caster swivelly mounted on each side frame at the rear portion thereof, each side frame including a longitudinal bar positioned parallel to but below the seat, an operating wheel attached to each longitudinal bar by an adjustable clamp whereby such wheel may be positioned convenient to be grasped by the occupant of the chair and a drive connection between the operating and the traction wheel on each of the side frames.

8. A wheel chair having two similar side frames with a connecting structure to retain said frames a fixed distance apart for operation as a chair and with a seat mounted between the frames, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame and projecting forwardly of the seat whereby the occupant may rest his feet on such boards or displace the boards to propel the wheel v chair by the feet, a small diameter traction wheel mounted in a fixed position on each side frame with the forward portion of the periphery of the wheel spaced rearwardly from the front of the foot board, a caster swivelly mounted on each side frame at the rear portion thereof, an operating wheel secured to each side frame in a position t'o be grasped by the occupant of the chair, a driving connection vfrom the operating wheel to the traction wheel, the swivel caster of each side frame having an inclined spindle yoke and an attaching means for locking the caster wheel with the yoke inclined forwardly to each side frame to align the traction and caster wheels in a front to rear direction. l

9. A wheel chair having two side frames with a connecting structure to retain the frames a fixed distance apart, a seat mounted between the frames, a traction wheel of small diameter having its axle mounted on a side frame substantially below the front edge of the seat, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame positioned forwardly of the axle of the Wheel, the foot board being displaceable whereby the person sitting on the seat may propel the wheel chair by b; feet, each side frame having a caster wheel .tt the rear, the vertical line through the center of gravity of a person sitting on the seat being always rearwardly of the axle of the traction wheels, and means to lock each caster wheel in a front to rear direction.

10. A wheel c'fiair having two side frames with a connecting structure to retainthe frames a fixed distance apart, a seat mounted between the frames, a traction wheel of small diameter having its axle mounted on a side frame substantially below the front edge of the seat, a displaceable foot board secured to each side frame positioned forwardly of the axle of the wheel, the foot board being displaceable wnereby the person sitting on the seat may propel the wheel chair by his feet, each side frame having a caster wheel at the rear, the vertical line through the center of gravity of a person sitting on the seat being always rearwardly of the axle of the` traction wheels, an operating wheel having its axle adiustably mounted in a front to rear direction on each side frame and a drive connection from each frame.

11. A wheel chair having two side frames with a pair of diagonal cross braces connecting the side frames, a connecting means between the diagonal braces permitting a twist or warping of one frame relative to the other, a small diameter traction wheel secured to each side frame at a forward position and a.- caster wheel secured to each side frame at a rear position, a seat between the frames, a drive means operable by the occupant of the seat to actuate the traction wheels, the connection between the diagonal braces providing for the traction wheels being both always in contact with the ground should one wheel engage a slight elevation or be over a slight depression in the ground.

12. A chair having two side frames with a pair of diagonal braces connecting. the side frames, a seat loosely connected between the side frames and a small diameter traction wheel having its axle secured to each side frame at a position substantially vertically below the forward edge of the seat, a caster wheel mounted on each side frame at a rear position, a displaceable foot rest secured to each side frame forwardly of the axle of the traction wheel whereby the foot rest may be displaced for propulsion of the chair by the person sitting on the seat, an operating wheel adjustably mountedin a front to rear direction on each side frame, a drive connection from the operating wheel to the traction Wheel on the same side, a longitudinal pivotal connection between the diagonal braces at their intersection having means permitting a twist or warping of one frame relative to the other whereby both of the traction wheels may be always in contact with the ground should one wheel engage a slight elevation or be over a slight depression in the ground.

13. A chair 'having two side frames with a pair of diagonal braces connecting the side frames, a seat loosely connected between the side frames and a small diameter traction wheel having its axle secured to each side frame at a position substantially vertically below the forward edge of the seat, a caster wheel mounted on each side frame at a rear position, a displaceable foot rest secured to each side frame forwardly of the axle of the traction wheel whereby the foot rest may be displaced for propulsion of the chair by the person sitting on the seat, an operating wheel adjustably mounted in a front to rear direction on each side frame, a drive connection from the operating wheel to the traction wheel on the same side, a longitudinal pivotal connection between the diagonal braces at their intersection having means permitting a twist or warping of one frame relative to the other whereby both of the traction wheels may be always in contact with the ground should one wheel engage a slight elevation or be over a slight depression in the ground, each caster wheel having a vertical pivot connecting such wheel to its side frame with a spindle yoke forming an obtuse angle with the vertical pivot whereby the spindle yoke may be inclined forwardly and means to latch each caster wheel with the spindle yoke inclined forwardly to its side frame with the plane of the wheel in a front to rear direction.

HERBERT A. EVEREST. HARRY C. JENNINGS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2469359 *Jan 24, 1945May 10, 1949Ames ButlerPortable support
US2591246 *Mar 1, 1948Apr 1, 1952Herbert A EverestAdjustable footrest for wheel chairs and the like
US2598985 *Feb 4, 1950Jun 3, 1952Herbert A EverestAdjustable leg rest for wheel chairs
US2618319 *Dec 26, 1951Nov 18, 1952Herbert A EverestX-brace construction for collapsible invalids' wheel chairs
US2798565 *Dec 23, 1954Jul 9, 1957RosenthalMotorized wheel chair steered by driving
US2847058 *Sep 10, 1953Aug 12, 1958Anthony G AllisonFolding wheel chair
US2930429 *Mar 26, 1956Mar 29, 1960Institutional Ind IncFrame structure for folding wheel chair
US2946602 *Apr 28, 1958Jul 26, 1960Anthony G AllisonWheel chairs with hand propulsion means
US2959212 *Jul 14, 1958Nov 8, 1960Gendron Wheel CompanySeat tube guide for folding wheel chairs
US4326732 *Sep 8, 1980Apr 27, 1982Sears, Roebuck And Co.Foldable wheelchair
US4625984 *Aug 12, 1985Dec 2, 1986Kitrell John VFolding wheelchair
US5401044 *Oct 30, 1992Mar 28, 1995Regain, Inc.Two piece collapsible wheelchair
US5609348 *Mar 27, 1995Mar 11, 1997Regain, Inc.Wheelchair
US7896385 *Sep 22, 2008Mar 1, 2011Michael EveryFoldable wheelchair
US20130113178 *Oct 3, 2012May 9, 2013The United State Government, as Represented by the Department of Veterans AffairsMobile Manual Standing Wheelchair
WO1996029969A1 *Mar 27, 1995Oct 3, 1996Michael H GalumbeckWheelchair
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/250, 280/42, 297/42, 297/DIG.400
International ClassificationA61G5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61G5/023, A61G5/026, Y10S297/04
European ClassificationA61G5/02A4, A61G5/02B4