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Publication numberUS2181594 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1939
Filing dateJul 3, 1936
Priority dateJul 8, 1935
Publication numberUS 2181594 A, US 2181594A, US-A-2181594, US2181594 A, US2181594A
InventorsErik Bjorkman Gustaf
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction nozzle
US 2181594 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 28, 1939. G. E. BJC'JRKMAN SUCTION NOZZLE Filed July 3, 1936 IN VENTOR.

Patented Nov. 28, 1939 PATENT OFFICE SUCTION NOZZLE Gustaf Erik Bjiirkman, Stockholm, Sweden, as-

signor to Electrolux Corporation, Dover, Del., acorporation of Delaware Application July 3, 1936, Serial No. 88,717

- In Germany July 8, 1935 7 Claims.

The present invention relates to suction nozzles for use in connection with vacuum cleaners, and more particularly to a suction nozzle having a suction opening the size of which may be altered at the will of the operator.

For removing the ordinary dirt found on and in a floor covering, it is desirable to have a comparatively large nozzle opening in order that a max mum amount of surface may be covered in a minimum of time. However, certain articles, such as threads, dog hairs, lint and the like tend to adhere to the surface of the covering with such tenacity that they are not removed by the air flow through a nozzle having a comparatively large opening, but may be removed if the velocity of air flow is increased. Such increase may be best effected by decreasing the area of the suction opening,

Among the objects-of the present invention is to provide a nozzle in which the size of the suction opening may be altered at will and without removing the nozzle from one surface bein cleaned.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawing which forms a part of this specification, and of which:

Fig. 1 is a view of a nozzle in accordance with the present invention attached to a vacuum cleaner unit;

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of the nozzle shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view similar to Fig. 3, but showing certain of theparts in a different position; a

Fig. 5 is a front view, partially in cross section of the nozzle shown in the preceding figures; and

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of one of the elements of the afore shown nozzle- Referring more particularly to Fig. 1, reference character III designates a vacuum cleaner unit including a dust bag II and a motor fan unit I2. Secured to the inlet of unit III' is a preferably flexible hose I9, the end of which is secured to a rigid hollow handle member II to which is in turn secured a suction nozzle I5.

Nozzle I5 includes a member I6 formed with lips II adapted to contact the surface to be cleaned. Member I6 is formed at either end with vertically extending portions I8 between which portions is slidably mounted an elongated member I9. The ends of member I9 are solid, while the central portion thereof is formed with an opening 20. The solid ends of member I9 are provided with grooves 2| into which extend pins 22, rigidly fastened in portions I8. A spring 23 is also disposed in groove 2| and is stressed between mcmber I9 and pins 22, thus tending to maintain the member I9 in the elevated position shown in Figs. 3 and 5.

Member I9 is guided in its up and down movement by pairs of angularly shaped vertically extending members 24, each consisting of a lug 24' running substantially perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of member I6 and a wall 24" running between lug 24 and portion I8 in parallel with said axis. Members 24 are secured to or integral with member I6. Members 24 constituting each pair are disposed on opposite sides of member I9 while the pairs of lugs are spaced from each other and from the ends of the member so as to divide the lengthwise extent of the member I6 into three substantially equal sections. The solid end portions of member I9 terminate at lugs 24 and the opening through member I9 is disposed entirely between the lugs.

Pivotally mounted between lugs 24' are wall members 25. Springs 26 are secured to the solid end portions of member I9 by means of screws 21, these springs being disposed between the pivoted members so as to tend to maintain them in substantially vertical positions, as shown in Fig. 3, with the upper inner edges of the members 25 in contact with downwardly extending walls 29 integral with the central portion of member I9 and forming part of the boundary of the opening 20 therethrough. This central portion of member I9 is also provided with inclined walls 29.

A hollow member 30 is connected to member I9 so as to be pivotable about a substantially horizontal axis. Member 30 has an inner cylindrical surface adapted to rotate on a similar cylindrical surface 3| formed on the upper part of member I9. Lateral extensions 32 are integral with member 30 and are received beneath cap members 33 secured to member I9, thus rotatably fastening member 3|! to member I9. Member 30 is adapted to receive the end of hollow handle member I4.

The operation of the above described device is as follows:

With the parts in the position shown in Figs. 3 and 5, rotation of the motor fan unit I2 causes air to be drawn in through nozz e I5, handle it and hose I3 to within the dust bag II. Any dust entrained with this air is deposited within the dust bag and the purified air passes through the material of the dust bag and is discharged from the unit.

With the parts in the aforesaid position, air is drawn into member 30 through the opening in member IS. with the part IS in the elevated position with respect to member l8, suction openings 34 are formed at either end of the nozzle. These openings are bounded at the top by member I9 and are bounded at both sides and their outer ends by fixed walls formed by member I 8, their inner ends being open to the passage 20 in member l9. nozzle opening bounded by the pivoted wall members is in direct communication with opening 20, air will be drawn into the nozzle throughout its entire length, thus enabling the nozzle to clean a comparatively wide strip during each stroke of the nozzle. The air fiow through this large opening is sufiicient to remove the ordinary dust and dirt embedded in and adhering to the surface undergoing cleaning.

In the event that this air flow is not able to remove some articles found on the surface, the operator bears down on handleJ4, thus moving member l9 downwardly with respect to body 18 against the force of springs 23. This movement of member l9 causes the solid end portions thereof to completely close and fill up the end .portions 34 of the nozzle opening, thus preventing air fiow therethrough. Also, the downward movement of member l9 causes the pivoted wall members 25 to be turned to the position shown in Fig. 4, by virtue of the fact that the upper edges of these pivoted members will slide along to the inclined surfaces 29. This pivoting of members 25 causes their lower edges to approach each other, thus decreasing the width of the opening therebetween.

Consequently, the length of the effective nozzle opening not only has been reduced by approximately two-thirds, but the width of the remaining one-third of the opening has" been decreased. jIhis results in an increase in the veloc ity of air flow through this opening which is able to pick up articles which strongly adhere to the surfacegundergoing cleaning.

The pivotal connection between members l9 and makes it possible to lower the handle I4 toward a substantially horizontal position in order to manipulate the nozzle under furniture. Moreoventhis pivoting of the handle does not aflect the size of the suction opening.

It will thus be seen that with the nozzle herein illustrated and described, the effective size of the suction opening may be reduced by the operator at will without removing the nozzle from the surface'undergoing cleaning.

Although I have shown a more or less specific embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that this has been done for purposes of illustration only and that the scope of my invention is to be limited only by the appended claims viewed in the light of the rior art.

What I claim is:

1.'In"a'suction nozzle, a body member formed with a suction opening having aportion bounded by fixed wall structure and a portion bounded in part at least by pivotally mounted side wall structure, and means for closing the portion of 'said opening bounded by said fixed wall structure and for moving said pivotally mounted wall structure inwardly towards the center of said opening to reduce the area of the portion of said opening bounded thereby.

Inasmuch as the 2. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed with a suction opening having a portion defined by fixed wall structure and a portion defined in part at least by pivotally mounted side wall structure, and a member displaceably mounted with respect to said body member and displaceable to close the portion of said suction opening defined by said fixed wall structure and to move said pivotally mounted wall structure inwardly towards the center of said opening to reduce the area of the portion of said suction openingdeflned thereby.

3. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed with an elongated suction opening, the end portions of said opening being defined by fixed walls, pivotally mounted walls defining the central portion of said opening, and a member reciprocably mounted with respect to said body member and movable in one direction to close said end portions and to turn said pivotally mounted walls to reduce the area of said central portion.

4. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed ing defined by said fixed wall structure and to move said pivotally mounted wall structure to reduce the area of the portion of said suction opening defined thereby.

5. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed with a suction opening having a portion defined by fixed wall structure and a portion defined in part at least by pivotally mounted wall structure, a member mounted .for movement in a vertical direction with respect to said body member, resilient means urging the movable member upwardly, and a hollow rigid handle member pivotally secured to said movable member for connecting said nozzle to a source of suction and formoving said nozzle on a surface to be cleaned, said handle being adapted and arranged to transmit downwardly directed force to said movable member for moving the latter downwardly to close the portion of said opening defined by said fixed wall structure and to move said pivotally mounted wall structure to reduce the area of the portion of said suction opening defined I thereby.

6. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed with a suction opening having a portion bounded by fixed wall structure and a portion bounded in part at least by pivotally movable wall structure, flow preventing means movable into the portion of said opening bounded by said fixed wall structure, and means for moving said movable wall structure-to reduce the area of the portion of said opening bounded thereby.

, 7. In a suction nozzle, a body member formed with a suction opening having a portion bounded by fixed wall structure and a portion bounded said opening bounded thereby.

'GUSTAF ERIK BJbR-KMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2500977 *Feb 15, 1945Mar 21, 1950Electrolux CorpRug nozzle with variable opening
US2585186 *Sep 11, 1945Feb 12, 1952Westinghouse Electric CorpSuction nozzle having a variable opening
US4091496 *Oct 28, 1975May 30, 1978Wilfrid DesrosiersVacuum cleaner nozzle
US4458378 *Jan 11, 1982Jul 10, 1984Vorwerk & Co. Interholding GmbhVacuum cleaner nozzle
US5285547 *May 11, 1992Feb 15, 1994Pavel SeborInternal by-pass valve for submersible suction cleaner
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/418, 15/421
International ClassificationA47L9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02
European ClassificationA47L9/02