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Publication numberUS2182454 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1939
Filing dateAug 9, 1937
Priority dateAug 9, 1937
Publication numberUS 2182454 A, US 2182454A, US-A-2182454, US2182454 A, US2182454A
InventorsSherman Alvin G
Original AssigneeSherman Alvin G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice cube tray
US 2182454 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 5, 1939. A. G. SHERMAN ICE CUBE TRAY 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug.A 9, 1937 BY @W @uw ATTORNEYS Dec. 5, 1939-. A, G, SHERMAN 2,182,454

ICE CUBE TRAY Filed Aug. 9. 1937 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. HZz/zn 6,' 57m/'man @mw Mm@ Patented Dec. 5, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Application August 9,

11 Claims.

'Ihis invention relates to ice cube trays.

This invention has particularly to do with an ice tray which is formed of exible rubber` and supported at the outside\and between individual 5 ice cube pockets by a reinforcing frame.

An object of the invention is to provide an ice tray so'designed that individual ice cubes may be easily removed therefrom. This is accomplished,

first, by suspending each individual soft rubber- 10 ice pocket from a reinforcing frame which is definitely larger in transverse dimensions than the dimensions of the cross-section of the ice pocket or the ice cube to be formed therein; and, secondly, by an unusual bottom design in the ice l5 pocket which quickly releases the cube from the bottom wall.

Upward pressure on the rubber ice pocket and ice cube contained therein will result in an easy removal of the ice cube since the soft rubber walls 20 will readily strip from the ice cube. Each ice pocket will essentially 'turn inside out until the ice cubeis fully released. The bottom wall of the ice cube is designed to have a substantially circular depression therein of smaller diameter than 25 the width of the wall. During the removal-.of the. ice cube this depression will be subjected to pressure and will gradually fold inwardly, to form a sort of dome in the bottom of the ice pocket meanwhile stripping itself from; the bot- 30 tom of the ice cube and readily releasing the bottom wall of the ice pocket.

A further object of the invention is to furnish an ice pocket that is especially adapted for use with a continuous ice cube forming and dispensing 35 device such as that disclosed in my Patent No'.

l In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a cut away perspective view of an. ice tray assembly showing the relation of the re- 40 inforcing wire frame to the soft rubber tray.

y Fig; 2 illustrates the supporting frame of the tray.

Fig. 3 is a side view of the assembled tray.

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the assembly.

Fig. 5 is a transverse section showing a modifled self-leveling construction.

Fig. 6 is a longitudinal section of the assembly.

Fig. 7 is a detail cross-section of an ice pocket and' ice cube illustrating the manner in which 50 the walls of the pocket strip from the ice cube.

Fig. 8 is a View similar to Fig. 7 in which the side walls and bottom of the ice pocket are completely freed from the ice cube.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged view of a section of the 55 assembly showing the dimensional relationship 1937, Serial N0. 158,123

between the ice pocket and the individual supporting means.

Fig. l illustrates a modification of the invention as adapted to a continuous ice forming machine.

Fig. 11 is a detailed cross-sectional view of the modification of Fig. 10 taken on the lines II-I I.

Fig. 12 is a side view showing the conveyor chain.

Figs.l 13, 14 and 15 illustrate various stages in the stripping of the ice cube from the walls and bottom of the ice pocket.

A preferred embodiment of one modification of the invention is illustrated in Figs. l to 9. The reinforcing means consists of a frame I (Fig. 2) composed of support members 2, a top edging bar 3, and cross-members 4 and 5, all suitably soldered or welded together. A soft rubber tray 6 (Fig. 1) is formed on frame l in such manner that the edging bar 3 and the cross-members 4 and are enveloped directly within the rubber itself. Individual ice cube pockets l are formed in each of the openings between the cross-members 4 and 5. In the bottom wall of each of the pockets a depression 8 is formed. This depression is preferably, though not necessarily, substantially circular in contour, and smaller in diameter than the width of the bottom of the ice pocket. y

An important feature of the invention is the manner in which the side walls of each of the ice pockets are designed in relation to the crossmembers 4 and 5 and the edging bar 3. At the normal level of the water in the ice pocket it is important that there be an upward and outward extending surface or arcuate brim 9 on eachside wall. Referring toV Fig. 4, for example, it will be seen that, between the edge of a formed ice cube and the reinforcing means ofthe supporting frame, as, for exampleIk members 3 and 4, there is a brim space designated a, and ,this is true on each side of the cube as shown by the longitudinal cross-section in Fig. 6. The walls of the ice pockets 'I are preferably tapered slightly toward the bottomv though this is not necessary to the successful operation of the device. In addition it is preferable thatthe side walls of the pocket be formed of very thin flexible material. This will facilitate the removal of the frozen substance as well as shorten the freezing time.

In Fig. 5 the cross-members 4 are shown dropped slightly from the edging bar 3 to form a self-leveling construction which facilitates the ice cube is subjected to upward pressure applied directly to the bottom of the vflexible rubber' pocket, there will be a tendency for the walls of the ice pocket to move upward `with the ice cube. These walls will be held down at the top by the supporting cross-members 4 and 5, and theresult will be that the upper, outwardly extending brim portion 9 ofthe walls will tend to pivot about the reinforcing members 3, I and 5 as fulcrums. This tendency to pivot will be transformed into a peeling action, best shown in Fig. 7, whereby the flexible walls of the ice pocket will be turned inside out and the ice cube will be easily freed from the pocket.

In the modification shown in Figs. 11 to 15, the ice pockets are formed in the longitudinal groups of as many as are desired. Parallel conveyor chains formed of links I0 are connected by transverse bars I2. The flexible rubber ice pockets are reinforced by apertured frames of substantially rigid material. Side members I3 of said frame are shown (end view) in Figs. 13, 14 and 15. Outwardly extending bearing lugs I4 are provided on the side members I3 for engaging the transverse bars I2 of the chain conveyor. These bearing lugs I4 are alternately spaced on each side of the frame to avoid interference with lugs of adjacent frames when they are suspended on the bars' I2, as shown particularly in Fig. 10. The side members I3 are joined at each end, and between each ice pocket, by cross-members I5 shown in cross-section in Fig. 11.

The flexible rubber ice pockets I6 formed around the frame bars I3 and I5 are provided with a reinforced bottom flange I1 in which is embedded a square apertured reinforcing member I8 which extends substantially to the edges of the flange I'I. In the rubber bottom of the pockets is formed a semi-spherical depression I9 which extends through the aperture in the reinforcing member I8. l

The operation of the above described modication is somewhat dierent from` that of the rst described device. The distance a is still provided between the reinforcing frame members I3 and I5 and the upper edges of the ice cube so that the side walls, as previously described, will function around the frame members I3 and I5 and strip or peel from the ice cube when the ice pocket is subjected to upward pressure. When the iianges I1 strike the lug bearings Il the lower portion of the ice pocket is no longer free to rise. The side walls of the pocket, are, however, iiexible enough that they Will stretch to allow the peeling action to continue. Furthermore, the pressure will be exerted directly on the ice cube through the portion I9 of ythe bottom of theA ice pocket. The peculiar formation of the bottom of the ice cube, due to this depression portion I9,`

will result in a peeling of the bottom away from the ice cube as pressure is exerted upwardly through the aperture in the reinforcing member I 'I (Fig. 15). In this manner theentire cube can be freed from the rubber pocket by a shorter stroke than was necessary in the first modication described. Y

This modification illustrated in Figs. 11 to 15 is especially adapted for use with continuousvice forming machines of the endless `conveyor type,

as described, for example, in my Patent No. 1,85'7,

122. In these machines a special` ejector member is provided with teeth or projections adapted to cooperate with the rubber portions I 9 in the bottom of the ice pocket.

It will further be seen that a wire reinforcing frame is not necessary to the invention as long 'as there is present anfequivalent thereof such as,

for example, a. sti rubber bridging member between the ice pockets.

What I claim is:

1. A container suitable for liquids to be solidied, comprising a plurality of individual pockets having flexible side walls, a flexible brim portion on each of said pockets extending outward from said side walls, relatively .stiff bridging means between each of said pockets andextending around the edge of said brim, said bridging means being adapted to serve as a hold down for the outer edge of said brim portion when a 4pocket containing the solidied substance is subjected to movement relative to said bridging means whereby said side walls will peel from said solidifled substance, and a substantially at bottom in each of said pockets having a depression formed therein which is adapted to turn inside out during the removal of said substance from said pockets.

2. In a. rubber tray suitable for liquids to be solidified, a substantially rigid frame comprising an outer rim, and spaced cross-members extending across said outer rim in two directions to form regular enclosed spaces therebetween, and a tray member formed on said frame comprising a number of spaced individual pockets having relatively thin exible side walls and arranged to register with said enclosed spaces in said frame, and flexible bridging portions integral with and between the adjacent walls of the pockets and reinforced by the cross-members of said frame the upper portion of said ilexible walls `being formed such that pressure against the bottom of any individual pocket when filled with a solidied substance will peel the ilexible side walls outward and downward from point of contact with said solidied substance.

3. A tray suitable for containing substances to be solidiiied comprising a skeleton wire framel embedded in a soft rubber body made up of individual ice pockets and-rubber bridging portions therebetween, cross-members on said frame positioned between and around said pockets and embedded in said bridging portions, and an outwardly extending flexible brim portion on each of said pockets integrally connected with said bridging portions and frame such that a solidified suba thin flexible side walls `having an outwardly ex-l frame, said frame being adapted to serve as a' pivot about which the brim portion of said side walls turns when the ice filled pocket is fmoved toward the frame.

5. I n a rubber ice forming pocket, an enclosed substantially rigid frame, an ice pocket formed on and supported in said enclosed frame comprising relatively thin flexible side walls having an outwardly extending brim portion in which is embedded the frame, a iiexible bottom portion enclosing said side walls and provided with an outwardly extending substantially rigid iiange, and means on said frame for engaging and blocking the movement of said flange as it is moved toward said frame, said frame being adapted to serve as a pivot about which the brim portion of said side walls turns when the ice filled pocket is pressed toward the frame.

6. In a soft rubber ice tray, a substantially thin rigid frame and cross-members, spaced ice pockets comprising relatively thin resilient side walls having outwardlyextending brim portions sup-l ported on said cross-members, a exible bottom portion enclosing said side walls and provided with an outwardly extending substantially rigid ange, a substantially semi-spherical depressed portion in said iiexible bottom portion, and abutment means on said frame for engaging and blocking the movement of said iiange when it is pushed toward said frame, said depressed portion and said brim portions being so designed that pressure on said bottom portion toward said frame will tend to peel the side walls of the pocket from ice contained therein, until said ange strikes the abutment means on the frame, and continued pressure on said depressed portion toward said frame will peel the remaining walls and bottom of the pocket from said ice.

7. In a soft rubber ice tray. a substantially thin rigid frame and cross-members, spaced ice pockets formed on and supported in said frame, each pocket comprising relatively thin resilient side walls having outwardly extending brim portions in which are embedded the cross-members of the frame, a flexible bottom portion enclosing said side walls and provided with an outwardly extending substantially rigid flange, a substantially semi-spherical depressed portion in said flexible bottom portion, and abutment means on said frame for engaging and blocking the movement of said flange when it is pushed toward said frame, said depressed portion and said brim portions being so designed that pressure on said bottom portion toward said frame will tend to peel the side walls of the pocket from ice contained.

cross-members of said frame and comprising relatively thin resilient side walls having outwardly extending brim portions supported by said cross-members, a iiexible bottom portion enclosing said side walls and provided with an outwardly extending abutment means, a. substantially semi-spherical depressed portion in said flexible bottom portion, and means on said frame for engaging and blocking the-movement of said abutment means when it is pushed toward said frame, said depressed portion and said brim portions being so designed that pressure on said bottom portion toward said frame will tend to pressure on said depressed portion ltoward said frame will peel the remaining walls and bottom y of the pocket from said ice.

9. In a soft rubber ice tray, a substantiauy thin rigid frame and cross-members, spaced ice pockets formed on and supported in said frame, each pocket being surrounded at its top portion by cross-members of said frame and comprising relatively thinA resilient side walls having out-t wardly extending brim portions in which are embedded the cross-members of the frame, a iiexible bottom portion enclosing said side walls and provided with an outwardly extendingsubstantially rigid iiange, a substantially semi-spherical depressed portion in said flexible bottom portion, and means on said frame for engaging and blocking the movement of said ange when it is pushed toward said frame, said depressed portion and said brim portions being so designed that pressure on said bottom portion toward said frame will tend to peel the side walls of the pocket from ice contained therein, until said flange strikes the blocking means on the frame, and continued pressure'on said depressed portion toward said frame will peel-the remaining walls and bottom of the pocket from said ice.

10. An ice tray for use with a continuous conveyor ice forming unit comprising a series of connected ice pockets formed in soft rubber, a substantially rigid supporting frame surrounding each of -said ice pockets, an outwardly extending flexible brim portion on each of said pockets connecting the same with said frame, and means on said frame for supporting said tray in a continuous conveyor, said ice pockets being adapted .to be released from ice cubes formed therein by movement toward said frame whereby the pockets are turned partially inside out and peeled from the ice cube.

11. An ice tray for use with a continuous' conveyor ice forming unit comprising a series-of connected ice pockets formed in soft rubber, a substantially rigid supporting frame surrounding each of said ice pockets, each pocket comprising relatively thin flexible side Walls, an outwardly extending brim portion on'said side walls connectingsthem to said frame, a iiexible bottom portion enclosing said side walls, and abutment means extending outwardly from said side walls at a point near the bottom of the pocket, means on said frame for supporting said tray in a continuous conveyor, and means on said frame for engaging and blocking the movement of said abutment means on the pockets as the same are pushed toward said frame, said frame being adapted to serve as a hold down for the outer edge of the brim portion of said side wall when bottoms of the pockets containing ice cubes formed therein are forced toward said frame,

whereby the sides and bottom of the pocket are freed from said ice cubes upon continued application of force through said bottom portion toward said frame. i

ALVIN G. SHERMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2415451 *Nov 11, 1943Feb 11, 1947Philco CorpIce tray
US2481525 *Jun 9, 1943Sep 13, 1949Commerical Plastics CompanyIce cube tray
US2487408 *Jan 20, 1945Nov 8, 1949Peerless Of AmericaApparatus for freezing ice cubes
US2584838 *Jul 28, 1948Feb 5, 1952Cube Drawer CorpFreezing tray
US2588222 *Jul 23, 1949Mar 4, 1952Allis Rubber CorpIce cube support
US2612261 *Oct 29, 1949Sep 30, 1952Squibb & Sons IncSuppository package
US2704928 *Mar 14, 1952Mar 29, 1955Stanley Curry RobertDevices for use in the production of ice in refrigerators
US2798498 *May 18, 1953Jul 9, 1957Aghnides Elie PAsh tray with cavities for extinguishing cigarettes
US2912836 *Jul 25, 1958Nov 17, 1959Gen ElectricIce maker
US2955044 *Dec 18, 1956Oct 4, 1960Tupper CorpMembranous shape-sustaining receptacles
US2966041 *Jan 28, 1958Dec 27, 1960Philco CorpRefrigeration
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/345, 220/486, 249/127, 62/353
International ClassificationF25C1/24, F25C1/22
Cooperative ClassificationF25C1/24
European ClassificationF25C1/24