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Publication numberUS2182470 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 5, 1939
Filing dateApr 27, 1938
Priority dateApr 27, 1938
Publication numberUS 2182470 A, US 2182470A, US-A-2182470, US2182470 A, US2182470A
InventorsJay Erdman
Original AssigneeLewis Mattern D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Masonry unit or block
US 2182470 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Des. 5, 1939.

Patented Dec. 5, 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE fourth to D. Lewis! Mattern,

Conn.

Bridgeport,

Application April 27, 1938, Serial No. 204,544

Claims.

The invention relates to improvements in masonry units or building blocks. The objects of the improvements are to produce a masonry unit providing the maximum of strength and.

5 insulation value per pound of weight of structures composed of masonry units. It is further intended to provide a unit in which the moisture of condensation, inevitable in wall construction, will be dissipated from the insulating medium with the greatest facility in the minimum length of time.

One form of the invention is illustrated and described in the accompanying drawing in which;

Figure 1 is a plan of the masonry unit as placed in the finished structure.

Figure 2 is a cross section through the line A-A of Figure 1 but with the unit in an upright or true position with relation to the finished wall.

Figure 3 is an end view of the unit in the same position as in Figure 2.

As shown in this illustration the unit comprises a block of laminated or layer construction with all layers in parallel, vertical planes and so disposed as to form together with identical layers in the adjoining units, a wall of three or more vertical sections. The various layers of the unit are all molded or cast into an integral unit being tied securely together by metal ties T in the process of manufacture. The insulating layer X is made of a material with any desired heat, sound and moisture insulating qualities. It is generally rectangular in shape and preferably of the same dimensions as the face of the unit 0 making it extend to and flush with four surfaces of the unitthe two ends El and E2, the upper face U and the lower face L in a plane parallel with the two faces 0 and I. It may, however, extend flush with only the upper and lower faces U and L and be terminated at either one or both ends at a point indicated by the dotted line Y Y just inside the inner wall of the end webs. Where desired, the insulating layer X may be comprised of two or more piecesdetermined by the number of webs in the unit-of dimensions identical with the cross sections of the webs in which they are placed, eliminating the use of insulation through the air cells, C.

The outer and inner layers 0 and I in the three layer block are made of concrete or similar load bearing material. In a unit having more than three layers, the alternate layers are of this load bearing material with the insulating layers separating them. These load bearing sections are so designed as to form, in the completed unit, one or more air cells on either side of the insulating layers. The air cells so formed extend completely through the body of the unit in a vertical direction. These load bearing sections may have a cross section of any size but 5 this cross section should be of only sufficient size to obtain a desired load bearing surface B leaving the air cells as large as possible for the size of the unit. The larger the air cells, the more rapid the dissipation of the condensed moisture l0 absorbed by the insulating layer.

The insulating efficiency of this unit may be increased to any desired point by increasing the number of layers to five or more and using two or more layers of insulation separated by either 15 web sections or a full size section or sections with webs on either side to match with the webs of the face layers and to produce the desired air cells.

Without further description it is believed that 20 anyone familiar with masonry or architectural practice will readily appreciate the features and advantages of this unit and realize that this design produces a masonry unit of great strength, high insulating value, high moisture penetration 5 resistance and eliminates to a large extent the ultimate rotting or disintegration of the insulation.

It is, of course, understood that changes in shapes, dimensions, materials and minor details 30 of construction may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A laminated masonry unit, comprising a 35 pair of vertically disposed parallel horizontallyspaced load bearing layers, each having upon its inner face a vertically extending web opposed to the corresponding web of the other layer, said webs forming vertically extending air cells within the unit having open sides opposed to said load bearing layers, an intermediate layer of insulating material disposed between said opposed webs and having surfaces directly exposed to said air cells, and metal ties anchored into said 45 webs and extending through said insulating layer to bind said load bearing and insulating layers together as a unit.

2. A laminated masonry unit, comprising a pair of vertically disposed parallel horizontally 50 spaced load bearing layers, each having upon its inner face a plurality of horizontally spaced vertically extending webs opposed to the corresponding webs of the other layer, said webs forming vertically extending air cells within the unit 55 having open sides opposed to said load bearing layers, an intermediate layer of insulating material disposed between said opposed webs and having surfaces directly exposed to said air cells, and metal ties anchored into said webs and extending through said insulating layer to bind said load bearing and insulating layers together as a unit.

3. A laminated masonry unit, comprising a pair of vertically disposed parallel horizontally spaced load bearing layers, and wall sections integral with said layers and forming vertically extending air cells within the unit, and an intermediate layer of insulating material extending into contacting relation with said end walls to span and be directly exposed to said air cells.

4. A laminated masonry unit, comprising a pair of vertically disposed parallel horizontally spaced load bearing layers, end wall sections integral with said layers, each of said layers having upon its inner face a vertically extending web horizontally spaced from said end walls and opposed to the corresponding web of the other layer, said webs forming vertically extending air cells within the unit having open sides opposed to said load bearing layers, an intermediate layer of insulating material disposed between said opposed webs extending into contacting relation with said end walls to span and be directly exposed to said air cells, and metal ties anchored into said webs and extending through said insulating layers to bind said load bearing and insulating layers together as a unit.

5. A laminated masonry unit, comprising a pair of vertically disposed parallel horizontally spaced load bearing layers, each having upon its inner face a pair oi. vertically extending end wall forming webs and an intermediate vertically extending web spaced from said end webs and forming vertically extending air cells within the unit having open sides opposed to said load bearing layers, the webs of one .ayer being opposed to the corresponding webs of the other layer, an intermediate layer of insulating material disposed between said opposed webs to span and be directly exposed to said air cells, and metal ties anchored into said webs and extending through said insulating layer to bind said load bearing and insulating layers together as a unit.

JAY ERDMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2518640 *Jan 11, 1946Aug 15, 1950Purinton John BInsulated building block
US2540349 *Sep 19, 1946Feb 6, 1951Reed Robert SReinforced building block
US3237357 *Jan 10, 1962Mar 1, 1966Hutchings Carl HWall and floor construction of prestressed concrete
US3828504 *Apr 9, 1973Aug 13, 1974Egerborg BConcrete structural member with high internal damping
US5222338 *Mar 12, 1991Jun 29, 1993Hull Harold LPrefabricated concrete wall
US5351454 *May 24, 1991Oct 4, 1994Hoechst AktiengesellschaftSelf-supporting facade component in sandwich construction
US5560167 *May 25, 1994Oct 1, 1996Miceli; RobertLaminated masonry block system
DE3444805A1 *Dec 8, 1984Jul 25, 1985Matti Antero SundbergBaublock
EP1918477A2 *Nov 2, 2007May 7, 2008Dmitrijs SamitinsMultilayer building block, assembly of such blocks and method of erection of building structures by using such blocks
EP2045059A2 *Jan 25, 2008Apr 8, 2009Rudus OyBuilding element and its production method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/410, D25/115, 52/405.3
International ClassificationE04C1/41, E04C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04C1/41
European ClassificationE04C1/41