Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2182795 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1939
Filing dateAug 7, 1937
Priority dateAug 7, 1937
Publication numberUS 2182795 A, US 2182795A, US-A-2182795, US2182795 A, US2182795A
InventorsLouis J Day
Original AssigneeLouis J Day
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface drain
US 2182795 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 12, 1939. DAY 2,182,795

SURFACE DRAIN Filed Aug. 7, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 5 ,12/0 /7 f 16 k Q 9/ 6 (\9 6 6 (\9 l6 6 F\ 0- 000 -00 r v 000000000000 79 /7 24 VOOOGQOOO000000000000000000 l7 OOOQOOOQOOOOOPOOOGOGOOO000000 I I B ATTORNEYS.

Dec. 12, 1939. L. J. DAY

SURFACE DRAIN Filed Aug. 7, 1937 2 Shets-Sheet 2 a H y 4, a 00 000 I 0 0 O J 0 0 0 0 ,J I 0O 0 0 0 8 oo 0 7 53 o oo o o v 7 0 0 9 0 o M Ir) o o 0 1 i It 6 O 0 Q O 0 c 0 O A O O O 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 OOTJ 0 0 1 OOMOMOOTHOOO l 0 0 o 0 0 1 1 5 2 no Patented Dec. 12, l -'59 UNi'iED STAT eATENT orr cs SURFACE DRAIN Louis J. Day, Floral Park, N. Y.

Application August '7, 1937, Serial No. 157,912

' 15 Claims (01. 182-31) This invention relates to a surface drain, and the embodiment shown is especially adapted to serve as a platform or exposed surface drain for swimming pool installations, public shower rooms, etc., where a considerable amount of water is likely to accumulate on the floor and more or less solid matter, requiring rapid draining of the surface and efiectivestraining of sediment therefrom. In such installations, articles of value frequently go down the drain inlet passages (top grill work), and it is important to prevent such articles from reaching the soil pipe.

An object of the invention is to provide a surface drain having provision for straining all the liquid that may pass to the drain at any time, as during the operation of cleaning out sediment in the event the entire drain becomes clogged or inoperative while an accumulation of water is still standing over the drain inlet.

A further object is to provide, in connection with a drain having a strainer cup or bucket, a supplementary or emergency strainer which becomes effective only when the grate is removed, or when the strainer bucket is rendered accessible for emptying the same. Still-another object is to provide for supplementary or emergency straining of liquids which remain over the drain after clogging, and which will not increase materially the size of the installation or cost thereof.

A further object is to provide a device for preventing premature removal of an emergency (normally inactive) strainer, whereby all liquid which may remain over the drain, when finally stopped up, will be fairly certain to pass through the emergency strainer passages and not by-pass l the same to the soil pipe.

Other objects including carrying out of the above objectives, by apparatus which is of relatively low cost and rugged construction, will become apparent from the following description relating to the accompanying'drawings, showing the preferred forms. The essential characteristics are summarized in the claims.

The drawings show two forms, Figs. 1 to 4, and Figs. 5 to 8, respectively. Fig. 1 is a plan View of one form of drain, a portion of the top grill work or grate being broken away; Figs. 2 and 3, respectively, are longitudinal and transverse central sectional views, as indicated by the lines 2-2 and 3-3 on Fig. i; Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view, similar to Fig. 2, showing the sediment cup and strainer clogged and the grate removed to render the supplemental or emergency strainer effective; Fig. 5 is a plan View showing the ther form; Fig; 6 is a diametral sectional view thereof as indicated by the line 6-6 on Fig.- 5; Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6, showing the grate partially removed and the supplemental or emergency strainer rendered effective thereby, and Fig. 8 is a detailed sectional view as indicated by the line 8-3 on Fig. 6.

Referring further to the drawings A (all figures) represents flooring, such as a body of concrete having an upper surface S to be drained. This surface, as usual, slopes toward the drain inlet passages. The drain body, as shown in Figs. 1 to 4, may comprise a suitable hollow metal casting i, having continuous sidewalls 2 forming, as shown, a rectangular chamber which is closed as by a bottom wall 3 which slopes from all sides toward a central discharge outlet passage 4. The outlet passage may be connected, as by means of a neck 5 formed on the bottom, with a soil pipe B, shown threaded to the neck at 6. The upper rim of the side wall is continuously flanged outwardly as at 8 to form a continuous recessed retaining step as at 9, for a grate it. The grate, a flat plate casting, as shown, is removable by being lifted and'has imperforate marginal portions Illa which set flush with the top of the body in the step 9. Fairly large drain openings are provided by grill work II at one end of the grate, and a relatively large rectangular end portion I2 of the grate is imperforate, as clearly shown in Figs. 1 and 2. The grill work, as shown, comprises widely spaced grate bars, integral with opposite marginal portions of the plate which forms the grate l0.

, Contained in the drain body and supported as on the bottom 3 is a combined sediment bucket and strainer [5, including a main strainer bucket portion l6 and a supplemental strainer bucket portion 20. The main bucket portion it underlies the grill work I! and has continuous side walls 11, joined by a bottom l8, both said walls and the bottom preferably being provided with a multiplicity of strainer openings E9. The bottom N3 of the main strainer bucket is spaced a short distance above the bottom 3 of the drain body as by supporting legs l8a, which engage said bottom as a support.

The supplemental strainer bucket 20 closely underhangs the imperforate portion l2 of the grate and has continuous side walls, including one imperforate wall portion Ha, which may be formed as an upward continuation of the adjacent wall I'I, and a bottom 2!, which is spaced a material distance off the bottom 3 of the drain body. The continuous rim formed by the walls ofthe supplementary strainer bucket lie very close to the under surface of the imperforate portion of the grate so that ordinarily no liquid or any other matter can get into the supplemental strainer bucket. Both the side walls and bottom except for the wall l'ia preferably have strainer openings as indicated at 23. It should be mentioned that the main strainer bucket l6 has the upper portion of its side walls, with the exception of the portion Ha, flared outwardly at 2 and continued substantially to meet the adjacent surfaces of the walls 2 of the drain body. The flaredout portions underhang the imperforate marginal portions of the grate, so that all liquid discharged through the grill work is emptied into the strainer bucket and also to provide space for free passage of liquid beyond the strainer openings iii of the upright walls of the bucket.

In normal operation, water and included sediment washes off the surface S through the grill work H where the larger sediment particles are strained from the liquid by the openings H] of the main sediment cup or bucket I6 before the liquid discharges into the outlet B.

After a considerable period of use, larger particles of sediment will clog all or substantially all of the strainer openings l9 and it will then be necessary to remove the bucket and empty it. Ordinarily, this is done by removing the grate and then the bucket. However, in the event clogging stops all liquid passage to the soil pipe, through the drain body, liquid will stand on the surface S at some depth over the grill. In that event, the grill is lifted, thereby exposing the open top of the supplemental or emergency bucket portion 2!], while the flared flange portions and partition wall ll'a will prevent flow of liquid into the main drain body, except through the supplemental strainer. Since the strainer openings of the supplemental strainer have not been subjected to use until the grate is removed, none of said supplemental strainer openings will be clogged and the liquid will quickly drain off the surface S; all sediment and e. g. articles of value being caught by the walls of the supplemental strainer. Thereupon the strainer bucket is removed, emptied and replaced in the drain body, and when the grate has been replaced in position, the drain is ready for further use. Fig. 4 illustrates the condition demanding removal of the grate, which operation renders effective the supplemental strainer quickly to drain all liquid off the floor surface and conditioning the sediment bucket for removal in order to dump it. An accumulation of sediment substantially stopping all normal straining is indicated at D.

Referring now to the other form, Figs. 5 to 8, the various parts of the drain body and soil pipe are arranged essentially the same as before, except for size and proportion, the corresponding parts being designated 2' for 2, and 3 for 3, etc. In the particular showing, the drain body I is circular in cross-section, having a single continuous annular side wall effect, including the stepped flange for receiving the grate ID. The grate is modified to the extent that the openings are made as generally radiating passages 30, converging toward the central region of the drain body within the sediment cup or bucket 3|. The cup or bucket is shaped similarly to the body, has both side and bottom strainer openings l9, as shown, and the cup rests on legs lBa, which in turn rest on the bottom of the drain body, spacing the bottom of the cup off of the bottom of the body. Preferably the leg effects lac are seated in an annular groove 32 on the upper side of the bottom portion of the body, whereby to maintain the cup centrally located with respect to the body side wall. The upper rim of the sediment cup extends substantially in contact with an imperforate marginal undersurface 33 of the grate which, as shown, is frustro-conical in shape extending downwardly into the strainer bucket and inwardly toward its center on all sides.

Lying outwardly from the annular side wall of the sediment cup and concentric therewith is a continuous skirt or sleeve 35 perforated as at 37. The skirt may be attached as by suitable lugs (not shown) or by welding, to the underside of the imperforate outer marginal portions of the grate. This skirt lies fairly close to the inside wall of the drain body side wall, and when the grate is lifted a distance less than the length of the skirt 35, no appreciable amount of liquid can get into the drain body except through the perforations of the skirt 35, and, of course, the grate passages 39. The effect of the converging grate passages is to keep the sides I! of the strainer bucket from fouling before the bucket has been filled. The bars are wedge-shaped, and the thickest portion is at the surface of the drain, so that debris will pass therebetween freely. The dome-shaped undersurface of the grate confines the central portion of the pile of sediment so as always to leave some of the upper openings [9' of the sediment cup 3! exposed to the interior of the cup. Thus, when the grate is lifted, carrying the sleeve 35 into the position of it shown in Fig. 7, then any liquid admitted to the drain body through the passes 30 will deposit the solid matter therefrom into the cup 3| where such solid matter will be retained by the perforated strainer wall as the liquid drains off. In the meantime, accumulated water on the surface S quickly drains through the side openings of the 1 pins G2 (see Figs. 6 and 7) in the manner of a bayonet look. In initially placing the grate and the sleeve into the body, the grate and sleeve must be turned a few degrees in order for the pins to pass the stepped portions of the slots. When an attempt is made to remove the grate and skirt assembly, the pins will contact with the upper walls of the steps in the slots and a suincient time ordinarily will be occupied, in turning the skirt to the right position in order to remove the assembly. This permits the standing liquid to drain off through the side openings of the skirt, but without carrying any appreciable amount of sediment or at least any larger sediment particles into the drain body and out at the soil pipe.

I claim:

1. In a drain device, having a drainage receptacle and a removable grate which partially closes the inlet thereof, main and supplemental strainers inside the body, the main strainer being effective to contact and strain liquid from 2. In a surface drain device, having a body normally closed by a grate device having a grill portion and an imperforate portion, a sediment bucket device and a strainer removably contained in the body and respectively Vertically aligned with the grill and imperforate'portions of the grate device, said strainer being attached to one of said devices and removable from the body therewith.

3. A surface drain device, comprising a body which forms a drainage receptacle having an inlet, a grate for partially closing the inlet, a strainer bucket removably supported in the interior of the body and adapted to receive liquid through the grate openings, said bucket being removable through the inlet of the body for dumping the bucket when the same becomes clogged with sedimerit, an emergency strainer device disposed adjacent the strainer bucket and removable from the body therewith, said emergency strainer having means associated therewith to block the flow of liquid to the emergency strainer, except when the grate is removed.

4. In a drain having a main body which opens upwardly to the surface to be drained, a grate device for partially covering the opening and having grill work at one side and an imperforate portion at the other, a sediment bucket disposed below the grill work for receiving drained liquid and trapping sediment therefrom, a strainer fixed to the bucket beneath the imperforate portion of the grate device in a manner to become operative to receive liquid which may stand over the open top of the body upon upward movement of the grate.

5. In a drain, having a main body which opens upwardly to the surface to be drained, a grate device for partially covering the opening and having grill work at one side and an imperforate portion at the other, a sediment bucket device disposed in'the body below the grill work and in spaced relation to the walls of the body, said bucket device having upwardly flaring imperiorate wall portions adjacent its upper edges, which extend beyond the grill work in a manner to insure that all liquid passing through the grill work will be deposited in the bucket, and a strainer having an imperiorate wall cooperating with the imperforate grill portion for normally blocking admission thereto of liquid received through the grill work but rendered operative to receive liquid which may stand over the open top of the body when the grate is removed.

6. A drain device, comprising a body having an upward inlet and an outlet, a grate partially closing the inlet and having inlet passages, a sediment bucket removably disposed inside the body and having walls, the upper portions of which are disposed outwardly from the discharge portions of the inlet passages, and strainer means associated with the grate on its underside and adapted to strain liquid into the body around the sediment bucket in a predetermined raised position of the grate.

"I. In a drain device, a drainage receptacle adapted to be operatively associated with a floor and having an upwardly disposed opening, a grate partially closing the opening and forming an inlet to the receptacle, a strainer skirt disposed in the receptacle depending from the grate in close proximity to the sides of the receptacle, whereby the skirt is rendered effective to strain liquid into the receptacle over the top thereof when the grate is lifted.

8. In a drain device, a drainage receptacle adapted to be operatively associated with a floor surface and having an upwardly disposed opening, a grate partially closing the opening and forming an inlet to the receptacle, the combination therewith of main and supplemental strainers disposed in the receptacle, one surrounding the other, the. supplemental strainer being rendered accessible to contactliquid drained fromsuch floor substantially only when the grate is moved upwardly.

9. In a drain device, a drainage receptacle adapted to beoperatively associated with a floor and having an upwardly disposed opening,- a grate partially closing the opening and forming an inlet to the receptacle, the combination therewith of a strainer disposed in the receptacle, depending from'the grate and rendered accessible to receive liquid from such floor when the grate is moved upwardly, and means adapted and arranged temporarily to limit the upward movement let, the outer body being open at the top andnormally closed by a grate, passages in the grate being directed toward the central region of the bucket, and a strainer skirt surrounding the bucket depending from the grate and spaced radially from the wall of the bucket, but in continuously close relation to the wall of the outer body, whereby when the grate is lifted the strainer skirt substantially blocks lateral passage of liquid to the outer body except through the strainer openings of the skirt.

11. A drain device, comprising a drain body having an open top, a grate closing the top of the body and having inlet passages directed diagonally toward the central region of the body, a sediment bucket removably disposed inside the body and having walls disposed outwardly from the discharge portions of the inlet passages, said walls being perforated to serve as a strainer, and strainer means which is rendered operative when the grate is lifted in a manner to strain liquid into the body over the open top around the bucket.

12. In a drain device, a drainage receptacle adapted to be set flush with a floor and having an upwardly disposed opening, a grate partially closing the opening and forming an inlet to the receptacle, the combination therewith of asediment bucket and a supplemental strainer disposed in the receptacle, the strainer being disposed in surrounding relation to the bucket and attached to the grate and being rendered accessible to receive liquid from such floor when and only when the grate is moved upwardly, and means interposed between the supplemental strainer and the side wall of the receptacle adapted to form a stop, whereby to deter lifting movement of the grate for a short period sufilcient to allow liquid to drain off the surface through the supplemental strainer.

13. In a drain device, having a drain receptacle and a grate means which partially closes the inlets thereof, main and supplemental strainers disposed insde the body, the supplemental strainers being enclosed by the grate means to be normally ineffective to strain liquids from the surface to be drained, said grate means being adapted to be removed, whereby the main strainer will be accessible for cleaning and said grate means being capable of being removed without disturbing the contents of the main strainer.

14. In a drain device, a drainage receptacle adapted to be set flush with a surface to be drained and open at the top, cover means for the receptacle partially closing the top opening and forming the normal inlet passage to the receptacle, a main strainer and a supplemental strainer disposed in the receptacle to be normally active and inactive, respectively and the supplemental strainer being rendered accessible to liquid to be strained when the cover means is removed from the receptacle.

15. A surface drain, comprising a drainage receptacle open at the top and having an outlet opening associated with one of its walls below the top opening, a combined sediment bucket and strainer inside the receptacle, grate means adapted to discharge liquid into the bucket, said grate means being imperforate at one side thereof, and adapted to normally block entrance of liquid to the receptacle in a region below said grate means, and strainer means underlying the imperforate part of the grate means and rendered efifective by removal of the grate means for straining such liquid as may stand over the drain after 10 substantial filling of said bucket with sediment.

LOUIS J. DAY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3406829 *Oct 20, 1967Oct 22, 1968Hoffman Specialty Mfg CorpFloor drain
US4184950 *Feb 21, 1978Jan 22, 1980Hendrick Manufacturing CompanyMethod and apparatus for dewatering sludge
US4460462 *May 7, 1982Jul 17, 1984Arneson Products, Inc.Leaf trap and main drain assembly
US5403474 *Feb 24, 1994Apr 4, 1995Emery; Grant R.Curb inlet gravel sediment filter
US5405539 *Mar 4, 1993Apr 11, 1995Schneider; Thomas W.Waste runoff water treatment utilizing a collection box with inlet for drainage water and outlet for filtered water; filtration
US5535554 *Sep 8, 1995Jul 16, 1996Harris Jr.; Walter EFor preventing debris from clogging drain spouts
US5632889 *Jun 9, 1995May 27, 1997Tharp; Gary D.Insert for placing in catch basin including cartridge containing absorbent particles which absorb liquid hydrocarbons from water flowing therethrough
US5820762 *Dec 14, 1996Oct 13, 1998Bamer; Jonathan MichaelFilter insert for a storm drain
US5980740 *Jan 6, 1998Nov 9, 1999Civitas Erosion Services, Inc.Storm drain collection box filtration system
US6231758Aug 22, 2000May 15, 2001Abtech Industries, Inc.Curb-inlet storm drain systems for filtering trash and hydrocarbons
US6272804 *May 27, 1999Aug 14, 2001Jamie J. LeisRecessed tray floor drain
US6337025Feb 25, 2000Jan 8, 2002Environmental Filtration, Inc.Filter canister for use within a storm water sewer system
US6344519Jan 9, 1998Feb 5, 2002Abtech Industries, Inc.Oil spills
US6531059Nov 13, 2000Mar 11, 2003Abtech Industries, Inc.Suspended runoff water filter
US6609852Jan 8, 2001Aug 26, 2003Brian J. WimbergerSediment control drain and method of construction
US6623633 *Feb 22, 2002Sep 23, 2003Mcdermott Holly SusanSewer eco-collar for sump application
US6723791Dec 31, 2001Apr 20, 2004Abtech Industries, Inc.Systems for ameliorating aqueous hydrocarbon spills
US7048878Mar 24, 2003May 23, 2006Abtech Industries, Inc.Process of forming oil-absorbent bodies
US7052207 *Jun 3, 2003May 30, 2006Wimberger Brian JSediment control drain and method of construction
US7094338Feb 21, 2003Aug 22, 2006Abtech Industries, Inc.Method of making and using a filter in the form of a block of agglomerated copolymer fragments
US7186333 *Mar 9, 2005Mar 6, 2007Greg B. KentStorm drain filtration system
US7229560Dec 6, 2004Jun 12, 2007Abtech Industries, Inc.Sack-based processes for recovering oil floating on water
US7270747 *Mar 7, 2006Sep 18, 2007Henry HappelStorm water drain system
US7396471May 24, 2006Jul 8, 2008Wimberger Brian JFor positioning within an inlet to a storm sewer having a frame supporting a grate, and a curb box; drain catch basin formed in a suitable manner, that will fit into a storm sewer drain frame, and which will catch and retain concrete waste, and other debris
US7485218 *Mar 21, 2006Feb 3, 2009Ecosense International, Inc.Storm water filtration system
US7488414Jun 10, 2008Feb 10, 2009Wimberger Brian JStorm water filter for positioning within a storm water inlet
US7494585 *Sep 3, 2004Feb 24, 2009Khalil Ibrahim NinoLarge area catch basin filter
US7618532Oct 6, 2008Nov 17, 2009Mark A. MangromAromatic drain device
US7887697 *May 10, 2006Feb 15, 2011Mark MangromAromatic drain device
US7959799 *Feb 17, 2005Jun 14, 2011Henry HappelStreet curb filter basket system
US8366923May 28, 2010Feb 5, 2013Tom HappelTelescoping post supports and sliding lid systems for filter baskets
US8409433Mar 13, 2012Apr 2, 2013Aromatic Drain Device, Inc.Device for use with floor drains
US8491797Dec 8, 2010Jul 23, 2013Tom HappelPivoting panel, pylon and inflow gap for stormwater screen system
WO1999000557A1 *Jun 27, 1997Jan 7, 1999Australian Maverick Corp Pty LStrainer device and method
WO2005108690A1 *May 4, 2005Nov 17, 2005Hbf Van Beek Beheer B VReceiving device for use in combination with urinal
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/164, 210/316, 210/434
International ClassificationE03F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationE03F5/0407, E03F2005/0416, E03F5/0404
European ClassificationE03F5/04C4, E03F5/04D