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Publication numberUS2183277 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1939
Filing dateJul 1, 1936
Priority dateJul 1, 1936
Publication numberUS 2183277 A, US 2183277A, US-A-2183277, US2183277 A, US2183277A
InventorsHeilhecker Eugene C
Original AssigneeHeilhecker Eugene C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe with rubber or composition sole
US 2183277 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 12, 1939.

E. c. HEILHECKER 2,183,277

sHoE wIIII RUBBER OR COMPOSITION SOLE Filed July `l, 1956 IIIIIIIIIIIIII/ /III A l@ ATTORNEYS. I o A y Patented Dec. l2, 193g UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHOE WITH RUBIER .OR COMPOSITION OLE 8 Claims.

This invention relates to a shoe, more particularly that type having a rubber or composition sole; and it has for one of its objects the provision of a full-shaped shoe that is one having a heel and a sole with a definite instep portion between them, as distinguished from the` usual sneaker Where the distinct portions of the sole are more or less all run together.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a shoe with a sole which is completely shaped and vulcanized `or cured under pressure as distinguished lfrom the shoe in which the sole is cured or vulcanized after attachment or assembly in the shoe.

Another object -of theinvention is the production of a Stronger shoe `and one having a rubber sole in which the rubber has a `much more reduced porosity with the pores or openings which sometimes occur `in the -rubberremoved from the sole, these desired eiects occurring when the sole is cured under pressure in a mold as distinguished from being cured or vulcanized when attached to the shoe in hot air.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a shoe havinga rubber sole ywith cotton fabric or leather uperportions which will be morevdurable than similar shoes now in use due particularly to the fact that the vulcanizing `of the rub- .ber sole occurs previously to its attachment to the shoe, whereby ythe vulcanizing of the rubber .while in position on the shoe is avoided Vwiththe attendant benecial result that the oil in the cotton bers and in the leather is not extracted or driven out of these parts, whichdriving outA tends to lessen their strength and reduce their wearing life. f

Another object of the invention isy the provision of a mechanical attachment of the shoe sole to the lasted upper in a manner to avoid stitching which weakens the sole, and also to avoid cementing, which requires careful preparation of the surfaces to be cemented.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an attachment of a mechanical nature due to the shaping of the parts whereby the sole may be drawn tightly against the shoe upper kunder some little pressure of the sole lor compression vof the rubber, ifr desired, so that the sole will tightly hug the upper to provide a very desirable eifect and appearance and also prevent the entrance of moisture and the like into the juncture between the sole and the upper.

Another object oi the invention is the provision of a construction inwhich the sole may be readily Idetachedwhen 4worn by destroying the same and a new Y sole quickly attached without destruction .of the upper or parts of the shoe to which the sole was originally attached.

Another object of the invention is the rutilization of 4an insole and outsole attached together .through a separatingpart to which the shoe is lasted, v,whereby the three plies of material are held in Yrnc. and rigid relation.

-Withtthese and other objects in view, .the inventionconsists of certain novel features of construction, yas will be more vfully described, and

particularly pointed out in the appended claims. In the accompanying drawing: Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a shoeformed in accordance with my invention;

gtaching insole;

Fig. 7 is ar sectional view through a fragmental portion of onebf the attaching `means of this insole shown in Fig. 6;

flig. 3 is aisectional view .of the `toe .end of a shoe showing the outsole, auxiliary insole and main insole connected together;

Fig 9is a similar section through one of the interlocking `means of the assembly, but upon a somewhat larger scale.

Rubber and compositionfsoles at the present time are either stitched into position, which .35

stitchingputs through the rubber or composition soles and weakens the same, or these Ysoles are cemented inV place by kreason ofV a somewhat r-elabrorate preparation of the ysurfaces to be cemented lin order to obtainthe proper holding power, or o they may be vulcanized in place withthe .result that the sole will not have the shape desired; and in order to avoid such undesirable effects .I .have

provided an arrangement by which a pre-molded and,4 cured sole maybemechanically attached to the upper without the use of ,stitching and by reason of one of the interiitting parts ji'lxed tothe `insole joining to another ofthe interfltting parts on the outsole, the parts being molded or formed sothatby the resiliency ofthe interfltting parts f the outsole may beheld in place, further permitting interchange of solesand quick andeasy attachment by reasonof the pressure of.` forcing the parts together; andfthe following isa more detailed description of the present embodiment of this invention, illustrating the preferred means by which these advantageous results may be accomplished:

With reference to the drawing, I designates an insole to which the upper II is lasted with the lasting allowance I2 extending inwardly about the marginal edge of this insole, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. This upper II may be formed of canvas, leather or any suitable material, such as may be used with shoes having a composition sole. Holes I4 are punched through the insole I0 and lasting allowance I2, as shown in Figs. 2 and 3, of some suitable size such for instance, by way merely of illustration, as a quarter of an inch or five-thirty seconds of an inch.

'Ihe outsole designated I6 is of a molded composition material such as rubber and is formed complete in molding dies, and when of rubber s vulcanized prior to its attachment or assembly to the shoe. This outsole I6 is provided with a plurality of upstanding projections or cups I1 on its upper surface, which are recessed as at I8 with a flaring tapered mouth and undercut as at I9, as shown in Fig. 5. These cups are so located as to position and are of a size and shape to snugly t the openings I4 and of a height substantially the thickness of the insole Ill plus the lasting allowance I2. The outsole will be provided with some raised portion I which will t into the recess I3 formed by the thickness of the inner edge of the lasting allowance where it contacts the insole Ill. A lip 2i) is formed about the outer marginal edge of this outsole and is sufficiently flexible so that when the outsole is pressed up tight against the lasting allowance, there will be some give or iiexibility of this lip causing it to hug this lasting allowance snugly.

An auxiliary attaching insole 2| is shown in Fig. 6 and consists of a layer of material 22, such as leather or some fiber composition which will be comfortable for contact with the foot, and a layer of molded composition material 23, which may be either rubber or ber, preferably fiber, and will have an attaching knob 24 undercut as at 25, as shown more particularly in Fig. 7, provided thereon as an integral part or as a separate piece molded thereon.

This insole 2| will be placed within the shoe with the knobs 24 extending downwardly and the knobs will be forced into the cups I1 which will be positioned within the openings Ill, as above described. The forcing of these two parts together will be permitted by the resiliency of the rubber cups II or a resiliency of the knob 24, or a partial resiliency in both, so that the head portion 26 of the knob will lock under the undercut portion I9 of the cups I'I so as to firmly secure the outsole and insole together; and the arrangement will be such that sufficient pressure will be applied to cause a iiexure of the lip 20 causing it to snugly bear against the lasted portion of the upper and prevent the entrance of foreign matter between the outsole and the insole. If desired, however, in order to additionally assist the preventing of the entry of foreign matter at these points a cement may be used to ll in the space.

Thus, from the above it will be apparent that the main insole, the auxiliary attaching insole and the outsole can be firmly, mechanically attached by merely pressing them together with a very snug and secure joint between them.

By this arrangement if it is desired to supply a fresh outsole, should the original outsole become Worn, this can be cut from position without destroying the insole I0 and a fresh auxiliary insole 2l and outsole I6 supplied to the upper which is lasted to the insole l0. This can be quickly performed and an expensive portion of the shoe utilized for further wear with a fresh outsole. In this manner, an outsole having a welt formation may be provided, a stronger shoe is formed, and better shaped outsole formed than has heretofore been practical, with the further and additional advantage that the shoe may be resoled or provided with a fresh outsole and insole when desired.

The foregoing description is directed solely towards the construction illustrated, but I desire lt to be understood that I reserve the privilege of resorting to all the mechanical changes to which the device is susceptible, the invention being defined and limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole, an outsole along the outer surface of the said main insole, an auxiliary insole, means extending through said main insole and mechanically connecting s'aid auxiliary insole and said outsole, said means comprising undercut projections in one part and sockets on the other part to engage and lock with said projections.

2. In a shoe, a main insole provided with holes therethrough, an upper lasted to the main insole, an outsole along the outer surface of the said main insole, an auxiliary insole, and means extending through the holes of said main insole and mechanically connecting said auxiliary insole and said outsole, said means comprising undercut projections in one part and socket on the other part to engage and lock with said projections and both extending into said holes.

3. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole with a lasting allowance extending over the lower surface thereof, said insole and the lasting allowance of said upper having holes therethrough, an auxiliary insole on the inner side of said main insole, and an outsole on the outer side thereof having intertting connections through said holes, said interfitting connections on at least one of said parts being resilient.

4. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole with a lasting allowance extending over the lower surface thereof, said insole and the lasting allowance of said upper having holes therethrough, an auxiliary insole on the inner side of said main insole, and a rubber outsole on the outer side thereof having intertting connections through said holes, said intertting connec tions on said outsole being resilient.

5. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole with a lasting allowance extending over the lower surface thereof, said insole and the lasting allowance of said upper having holes therethrough, an auxiliary insole on the inner side of said main insole, and a rubber outsole on the outer side thereof having intertting connections through said holes, said intertting connections on said outsole being resilient and integral with said outsole.

6. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole with a lasting allowance extending over the lower surface thereof, said insole and the lasting allowance of said upper having holes therethrough, an auxiliary insole on the inner side of said main insole, and an outsole on the outer side thereof having interfltting connections within said holes, said intertting connections on at least one of said parts being resilient, and on the 10 jectons.

8. In a shoe, a main insole, an upper lasted to the insole, a molded outsole provided with formed securing means thereon of the same material as the outsole, an auxiliary insole Within the shoe,

and means provided on the auxiliary sole to afford a mechanical attachab-le connection With the formed securing means.

EUGENE o. HEILHECKER. l 10

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2528951 *Sep 8, 1948Nov 7, 1950Wulf EpsztejnFootwear with a removable sole
US2552943 *Apr 30, 1948May 15, 1951Jones & Malyon LtdShoe having a detachable upper
US2651117 *Aug 28, 1951Sep 8, 1953Josephine A HarrisMolded plastic shoe for dolls
US2745159 *Mar 30, 1951May 15, 1956United Carr Fastener CorpHeat sealable plastic fastener and assembly
US2760279 *Jul 5, 1955Aug 28, 1956Nu Dell Plastics CorpSandal
US2875541 *May 20, 1955Mar 3, 1959Leonard H LefcourtFoldable mat with disengageable indicia
US3442522 *May 31, 1966May 6, 1969Experimentory CorpMethod of skating and apparatus for practicing said method
US3510968 *Jun 26, 1968May 12, 1970Usm CorpShoes and shoemaking methods
US3890725 *Sep 14, 1973Jun 24, 1975Lea Darrel BernardShoe construction
US4317294 *May 20, 1980Mar 2, 1982Goodyear Mark VReplaceable shoe sole
US4377042 *Jan 19, 1981Mar 22, 1983Peter BauerFootwear having removable sole
US4420894 *Apr 19, 1982Dec 20, 1983Joel GlassmanSnap shoe
US4887369 *Aug 12, 1988Dec 19, 1989Angileen BaileyChangeable shoe tops/heels
US5435079 *Dec 20, 1993Jul 25, 1995Gallegos; Alvaro Z.Spring athletic shoe
US5617653 *Apr 4, 1995Apr 8, 1997Andrew S. WalkerBreak-away cleat assembly for athletic shoe
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US7016867May 21, 2002Mar 21, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
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US7219383Dec 6, 2004May 22, 2007Anthony AmbrosiniProcess for creating a pair of athletic shoes
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Classifications
U.S. Classification36/14, 36/15, 36/101
International ClassificationA43B13/00, A43B13/28
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/28
European ClassificationA43B13/28