Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2184141 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1939
Filing dateJul 17, 1939
Priority dateJul 17, 1939
Publication numberUS 2184141 A, US 2184141A, US-A-2184141, US2184141 A, US2184141A
InventorsArchie J Dodge
Original AssigneeArchie J Dodge
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel economizer for gas engines
US 2184141 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

fill W, 1939. A. J. DODGE 2,184,141

FUEL ECQNOMIZER FOR GAS ENGINES Filed July 17, 1939" ATTORNEYS Patented Dec. 19 1939 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE fifii'ifii ilfifiif Application July 17, 1939, Serial No. 284,862

9 Claims.

This invention relates to a gas engine and more particularly to an engine of the type which is cooled by circulating water through a water jacket surrounding the cylinders of the engine and a radiator whereby the water is air cooled and a crank case adapted to hold the lubricating oil which is agitated or churned by the rotation of the crank shaft in this case for the purpose of lubricating those parts of the-engine associated with the crank shaft.

It is well known that'water vapors when supplied to the fuel intake of the engine in addition to the regular or normal supply of fluid fuel such as gasolene, will improve the power output of 115 the engine and it is also well known that the churning or agitation of the lubricating oil in the crank case, as well as any raw gasolene which may leak through the joint between the cylinders and pistons into the crank case, produces a combustible vapor which has a substantial power producing value when added to the regular supply of gasolene delivered to the fuel intake of the engine.

It is therefore the object of this invention to provide simple and eficient means whereby the steam or water vapors produced by the heating of the water in the radiator and the combustible vapors produced in the crank case are mixed and- M means for accomplishing this purpose which are applicable to gas engines of standard construction without requiring any material alteration in the same.

A further object of this invention is to provide 4 the combustible fuel with lubricating properties so that the vapors entering the intake manifold consist of. an oily vapor which lubricates the valve seats, thereby preserving the same and leavin them in an oiled condition at all times, and also preventing the valves from being overheated by supplying a cooling lubricant.

A further object of this invention is to provide the combustible fuel with lubricating propertiesso that the upper cylinders are lubricated by the oily vapor, thereby preventing wear and scoring of the pistons of the cylinder walls.

Additional objects ofithis invention are to improve the engine in various details of construction for the purpose of utilizing the steam or water vapor of the radiator, also utilizing theheat from the exhaust manifold for maintaining the water vapor or steam in a superheated condition and also separating any water which may be entrained in the steam or water vapor for preventing the same from. entering the engine cylinders 3 and interfering with theoperation of the engine.

In the accompanying drawing:

Fig. l is a fragmentary side elevation, partly in section, of a typical gas engine equipped with one form of the invention, the oil inlet being shown on the same side of the engine as the breather for simplicity of illustration, these usually being located on opposite sides of the cylinder block.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary vertical section of the 15 same, taken on the correspondingly numbered line in Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section, taken on line 3--3, Fig. 2, looking downwardly. Although the improvements forming the suh- 20 ject of this invention may be embodied in gas engines of various constructions, that shown in the drawing, as an example of one suitable for use in connection with this invention, is constructed as follows: 25

The numeral it represents one of the working or power cylinders of the engine the block of which may have either a single cylinder or a mul tiplicity of the same and the numeral ii represents the piston which reciprocates lengthwise in this cylinder as the result of the explosion of the charges of fuel between the firing end of the cylinder and the piston. v

Each of the engine pistons is connected by means of a connecting rod or pitman l2 with a crank l3 on a crank shaft M which is journaled by suitable bearings on the base portion 15 of the engine frame. The numeral l6 represents the crank case which'is formed by the hollow lower part [5 of the engine frame and a drip pan ll 40 secured to the underside of the engine frame. This crank case encloses the cranks and the adjacent parts of the crank shaft, also theconnecting rods which connect the cranks with the pistons. The lower ends of the cylinders open into this crank case and the lower ends of the pistons face the interior of the crank case and a move partly into and out of the same during the operation of the engine. 50

The numeral i8 represents the fuel intake which receives the regular. or normal supply of combustible mixture such as air and vaporized gasolene from any suitable source through a supply or feed pipe l9 and delivers the same to the several cylinders of the engine in a well known manner.

The product resulting from the explosions of the combustible gas mixture in the several cylinders of the engine is carried away by an exhaust pipe or manifold 20 which communicates with the engine cylinders and delivers the spent gas to the atmosphere after having passed through a muiiier in the customary manner.

Lubrication of the crank shaft, cranks, connecting rods, and pistons is effected either wholly or in part by means of a body of lubricating oil 2| which is contained in the pan of the crank case and which is distributed to the various bearing surfaces exposed to or communicating with the crank case so as to be lubricated by the same such as the bearings of the crank shaft, the joints between the connecting rods and cranks, the pivotal connection between the pistons and-the connecting rods ,and the cooperating surfaces of the pistons and cylinders. This distribution of lubricating oil in the crank case to these bearing surfaces is efiected by the splashing or churning upon rotating the crank shaft, cranks and lower parts of the connecting rods which movable members sweep through the oil in the crank case with a rotary motion during the operation of the engine and cause the oil to be thrown in all directions so that all bearing surfaces exposed to or communicating with the crank case receive the necessary amount of oil to properly lubricate them and maintain the engine in good working condition.

As the lubricating oil in the crank case is consumed, due to wear and loss by leakage, the

supply of lubricating oil is replenished through an upright filling tube or oil inlet 22, shown for simplicity of illustration on the right hand side of the engine although usually found on the left hand side, the lower end of which is secured to the engine frame and opens into the crank case adjacent to one end thereof while its upper end serves as an inlet through which the lubricating oil is poured whenever this becomes necessary. In the present case this filler tube is arranged adjacent to the front end of -the crank case. but if desired the same may be arranged at or near the rear end of this crank case for the purpose by means of tubes 21 and 23 so that water will circulate through the radiator, water jacket and cause the water to abstract heat from the engine cylinders and the heat in the water will .be dissipatent to the atmosphere by the flow of air through air passages or cells of the radiator in a manner well known in this art. At its upper end this radiator is provided with a filling neck 29 through which water is introduced into the radiator when necessary, which filling neck is normally closed by means of a cap 30.

During the operationof the engine any gasolene or gasolene vapor which may leak past the Joints between the cylinders and the pistons escape into the crank case and as the cranks of the crank shaft and the lower parts of the connecting rods sweep through the lubricating oil in the crank case together with any gasolene that may have leaked into the same from the cylinders, combustible gases in the lubricating oil and gasolene are liberated due to the agitation or churning effect on the same by the crank shaft and the movable parts associated therewith. As the water heated by the cylinder passes through the radiator, the same gives off a steam or water .vapor at the upper end of the radiator.

The present invention has the purpose-of advantageously utilizing the enriching effects of the combustible gases which are liberated from the oil in the crank case and any gasolene that may be mixed therewith and also the steam which is generated by the radiator during the operation of cooling the water which comes from the water jackets of the cylinders. In addition to preserving the vaporous oil, any gasolene in the crank case is vaporized and drawn oil so as to prevent dilution of the oil. The gasolene vapors are also rendered available as part of the combustible gases.

Although these means may be variously organized'in accordance with this invention, the same, as shown in the drawing, are preferably constructed as follows:

The numeral 32 represents a steam or water vapor inlet 'opening formed in the wall of the crank case on that end thereof opposite to where the oil filling tube 22 is located, this vapor inlet in the present case being located at the rear end of the crank case and extending through the lower or base portion of the engine frame. Ordinarily this vapor inlet opening communicates with the outer atmosphere through the medium of. what has been generally known as a breather" in order to permit vapors to be discharged from the interior of the crank case to the outer atmosphere but in the present case this opening 32 is cut off from the outer atmosphere and instead is placed in communication with the upper end of the radiator so that steam or water vapors are conducted from the'latter into the crank case at a point opposite to where the filler tube or opening 22 is located. The conduit for thus conducting the water vapors from the radiator to the vapor inlet opening of the crank case in the. present instance comprises a comparatively large upright tube 33 which contains a separating chamber 34 and communicates at its upper end by means of an elbow 35 with the vapor inlet opening 32 of the crank case it, a

comparatively small intermediate pipe 36 connected at one end by means of a T-fitting 31 with the lower end of the separating chamber section 33 and a flexible section or tube 38 connecting the opposite end of the intermediate section 36 with the upper end of the interior of the water cooling radiator 26. By means of this construction steam or water vapor which is produced by the heating of the water'in the radiator is carried from the top or steam space of this radiator into the vapor inlet 32 of the crank which this steam conduit section 36 is secured to the underside of the exhaust manifold by means of straps 39, thereby promoting an intimate mingling of this steam with the combustible gases or vapors within the crank case. If it is desired, the steam conduit section 36 can be cast integrally with the exhaust manifold so as to obtain an improved heat transfer and a higher superheating of the water vapor passing through the conduit section 36.

By using a flexible section 38 as part of the steam conduit breakage of the same is avoided whenthe radiator and the engine block move relative to each other during the operation of the engine.

That part of the steam conduit 36 intermediately adjacent to the lower end of the separating chamber tube 33 is preferably depressed relative to the vapor inlet 32 of the crank case so that any condensation of steam which may occur-will. collect in this depressed lower part 3| of thepipe section 36 and may be drained therefrom by opening a pet cook 40 connected wit the T-fitting 3T.

Separation of any moisture entrained in the steam is effected by means of a baflle arranged in the lower part of the separating chamber tube 33 and having preferably the form of a disk which is secured at its edge to the inner side of the tube 33 above the drain cook 40 and provided with a plurality of radial openings 41 which are formed by slitting this disk and bending the metal between the slits at an angle, as shown at 42. As the steam vapors pass upwardly through the separating chamber 34 the same are intercepted by the bafile 42 and caused to swirl circumferentially therein, thereby separating any moisture which may be entrained in the steam and permitting only dry steam to reach the crank case.

The moisture separated from the steam drops from the underside of this baflie into the lower part of the separating chamber from which it may be withdrawn as occasion requires by temporarily opening the drain cock 40.

In order to break up the steam vapors before they pass from the separating chamber into the crank case, a screen 43 is arranged in the separating chamber above the baflie whereby the steam is put in the best condition for admixture with the combustible vapors in the crank case.

The lower end of the usual overflow pipe 44, which opens at its upper end into the upper part of the radiator 26, is closed by means of a plug 35. The purpose of plugging the overflow pipe at its lower end is not to prevent the escape of water from the radiator 26 but to avoid a direct flow of air up through the overflow pipe 44 and into the tube 38 without proper humidification of the air. To facilitate this external air is admitted to the upper end of the radiatorthrough an air inlet opening 46 in one side of the upper header, the air being drawn across the surface of the water thereby enabling the air to pick up more water vapor than would be the case if the overflow pipe 44 were not plugged. The opening 46 in the radiator header prevents the formation of a vacuum therein and at the same time provides a vent through which excess water may overflow from the radiator when the same is being filled.

During the operation of the engine the combustible vapors in the crank case together with become intimately mixed by the turbulence of the lubricating oil which is agitated by the crank shaft and associated parts. This mixture of water vapors and combustible vapors is drawn lengthwise through practically the entire length of the crank case from the vapor inlet 32 to the filling tube 22 by the suction effect of the pistons on the fuel intake and as this vapor inlet and the tube 22 forming an outlet for these vapors are arranged adjacent to opposite ends of the crank case, a very intimate mingling of these vapors is effected during such longitudinal movement in the crank case, whereby these auxiliary gases are put in the best condition for mixing with the normal or regular supply of fuel which is received by the fuel intake through the feed pipe l9. It will be noted that the filling tube 22 not only serves the purpose of a conduit through which lubricating oil is introduced to the crank case from time to time as required, but also forms the dual function of an outlet for the gases or vapors from the crank case preparatory to conducting the same to the regular fuel intake l8 of the engine.

No substantial amount of air is drawn through the crank case, the amount of air which actually is admitted being heavily laden with moisture.

It is readily seen that no foreign substance is permitted to enter the crank case since any foreign matter would be taken up by the water in the radiator. In other words, the air is washed in the radiator and only clean moisture laden air is admitted to the crank case.

The conduit whereby these auxiliary vapors are conducted from the vapor outlet ofthe crank case to the fuel intake preferably comprises an upper non-flexible pipe section 41 the upper end of which is connected with the central part of the fuel intake [8, a lower non-flexible pipe section 48 having its lower end detachably connected with the upper end of thefllling tube 22 and an intermediate flexible section 49 connecting the opposing ends of the upper and lower non-flexible sections 41, 48, as shown in Fig. 1.

'The detachable connection between the lower non-flexible conduit section 48 and the fillin tube 22 is preferably eifected by means of a plug 50 which receives the lower end of the lower pipe section 46 and is removahly secured in the upper end of the filler tube 22.

When the engine is in operation the plug 50 is secured in the filler tube 22 so as to form a practically tight fit therewith so that the auxiliary vapors escaping from the vapor outlet 22 of the crank case will be conducted to the fuel intake l8, but when it becomes necessary to replenish the supply of lubricating oil in the crank case this plug is removed from the filler tube in order to permit the introduction therethrough of the requisite amount'of lubricating oil into the crank case. Such manipulation of the lower pipe or section 48 of the auxiliary vapor conduit is permissible due to the flexibility of the intermediate pipe section 49.

' In the event that it becomes necessary or desirable to cut out the use of the means whereby the auxiliary fuel vapors are withdrawn from the crank case and added to the regular fuel supply coming into the fuel intake from the feed pipe l9, as may be necessary when trying out the enine after making repairs or adjustments or for other purposes, such cutting out of the auxiliary fuel feed device may be effected by means of a valve which is preferably arranged in the upper pipe section 41 of the auxiliary fuel supply conduit.

By utilizing the steam capois given ofl from the heated water in the radiator and mixing the same with the combustible gases derived from the crank caseby subjecting the same to the agitated oil in the crank case throughout practically the entire length of the latter and then delivering this auxiliary combustible mixture to the regular fuel supply of the engine, a substantial economy in the use of fuel for operating the engine is effected and deposit of carbon on the valves of the engine is practically eliminated, so that regrinding of the valve mechanism is reduced to a minimum thereby reducing the cost of operating the engine and maintaining the same in good condition.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a gas engine, the combination with a working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocating in said cylinder, a water jacket around said cylinder, a crank case, a crank shaft rotating in said case and having its crank connected with said piston, and a water cooling radiator connected with said jacket; of a water vapor supply conduit connecting said radiator with one end of said crank case, and a combustible vapor discharge conduit connecting the opposite end of said crank case with said fuel mixture intake, whereby water vapor from said radiator is conducted lengthwise through said crank case and mixed with the oil vapor in the crank case and combined with the normal fuel supplied to the fuel mixture intake, thereby enriching the combustible mixture and effecting a saving in fuel, In a gas engine, the combination with a working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocating in said cylinder, awater jacket around said cylinder, a crank case,- a crank shaft rotating in said case and. having its crank connected with said piston, an exhaust pipe connected with said cylinder, and a water cooling radiator connected with said jacket; of a water vapor supply conduit connecting said, radiator with one endv of said crank case, and a combustible vapor discharge conduit connecting the'opposite end of said crank case with said fuel mixture intake, whereby water vapor from said radiator is conducted lengthwise through said crank case and mixed with the oil vapor in the crank case and combined with the normal fuel supplied to the fuel mixture intake, thereby enriching the combustible mixture and eflecting a saving in fuel, said vapor supply conduit extending along said exhaust pipe to receive heat therefrom.

3. In a gas engine, the combination with working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocable in said-cylinder, a crank case having an oil inlet at one end and a water vvapor, inlet at its opposite end, a crank shaft rotatable in said crank case and connected with said piston, a water jacket around said cylinder, and a water cooling radiator connected with said water jacket; of a vapor supply conduit connecting said radiator with the water vapor inlet of the crank case, and a combustible mixture discharge conduit connecting said oil inlet with said fuel mixture intake and having a flexible section.- l

4. In a gas engine, the combination of a work ing cylinder having a fuel mixture intake,' a piston reciprocable in saidcylinder, a crank case having an oil inlet atone endand a water vapor inlet at its opposite end, a crank shaft rotatable in said crank case and connected with said piston,

a water jacket around said cylinder, a water cooling radiator connected with said water jacket, a supply conduit connecting said radiator with said vapor inlet, a discharge ,conduit connecting said oil inlet with said fuel. mixture intake, and a valve for controlling said discharge conduit.

5. In a gas engine, the combination of a working cylinder. having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, a crank case having an oil inlet at one end and a water vapor inlet at its opposite end, a. crank shaft rotatable in said crank case and connected with said piston,

a water jacket around said cylinder, a water cooling radiator connected with said water jacket, a supply conduit connecting said radiator with said vapor inlet, a discharge conduit connecting said oil inlet with said fuel mixture intake, a valve for controlling said discharge conduit, and a plug which receives a part of said discharge conduit and is removably connected with said oil inlet.

6. In a gas engine, the combination with a working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, a crank case having a combustible vapor outlet at one end which is connected with said fuel mixture intake and a water vapor inlet at its opposite end, a

crank shaft "rotatable in said crank case and.

connected with said piston, a water jacket around said cylinder, and a water cooling radiator connected with said water jacket, of a vapor supply condult connecting said radiator with said vapor inlet of the crank case, a baflie arranged in said vapor supply conduit and adapted to intercept water entrained therein, and a mixture discharge conduit connecting said oil inlet of the crank case with said fuel mixture intake.

7. In a gas engine, the combination with a working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocable in said cylinder, a crank case having a combustible vapor outlet at one end which is connected with said fuel mixture intake, and a water vapor inlet at its opposite end, a crankshaft rotatable in said crankcase and connected with said piston, a water jacket around said cylinder, and a water cooling radiator connected with said water jacket, of a vapor supply conduit connecting said radiator with said vapor inlet of the crank case, a baifle arranged in said vapor supply conduit and adapted to intercept water entrained therein, and a drain valve arranged in said vapor supply conduit below said baflle. I

8. In a gas engine, the combination with a working cyllnder'having a fuel mixture intake, a

' piston reciprocable in said cylinder, acrank case havinga combustible vapor outlet at one end which is connected with said fuel mixture intake and a water vapor inlet at its opposite end, a crank shaft rotatable in said crank case and connected with said piston, a water jacket around said cylinder, and a water cooling radiator connected with said watenjacket, of a vapor supply conduit connecting said radiator with said vapor inlet of the crank case, a baflle arranged in said vapor supply conduit and adapted to intercept ,water entrained therein, a screen arranged in saidvapor supply conduit above said baiiie, and a drain valve arranged in said vapo supply conduit below the baffle therein.

9. In a gas engine the combination with a working cylinder having a fuel mixture intake, a piston reciprocating in said cylinder, a water jacket around. said cylinder, a crank case. a

crank shaft rotating in said case and having its crank connected with said piston, and a water cooling radiator connected with said jacket and cut off from the outer atmosphere except through an upwardly extending opening in the top thereof, of a water vapor supply conduit conn c ng the upper part of said radiator with one end of said crank case, and a combustible mixture discharge pipe connecting the opposite end of said crank case with said fuel mixture intake.

ARCHIE J. DODGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423592 *Nov 10, 1942Jul 8, 1947Gen Motors CorpAir flow control for crankcase ventilation
US2482200 *Dec 31, 1947Sep 20, 1949Miller GeorgeMoisturizer for carburetors
US2723652 *Oct 26, 1953Nov 15, 1955Sr George KukovacCombination charge forming vaporizer and carburetor for internal combustion engines
US3259117 *Jul 8, 1964Jul 5, 1966Fog Aire IncMethod and apparatus for smog control
US4098231 *May 13, 1977Jul 4, 1978Oliver Thurston DavisApparatus for improving the efficiency and reducing the hydrocarbon emissions of carbureted engines
US4754726 *Jun 30, 1986Jul 5, 1988Eller Trevor LFor an internal combustion engine
US7210467 *Jun 22, 2004May 1, 2007Gas Technology InstituteAdvanced high efficiency, ultra-low emission, thermochemically recuperated reciprocating internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/25.00B, 123/573, 123/572, 123/41.29
International ClassificationF02M25/06, F02B47/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02B47/02, F02M25/06, F02M25/022, Y02T10/121
European ClassificationF02M25/022, F02B47/02, F02M25/06