Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2185353 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1940
Filing dateNov 1, 1937
Priority dateNov 1, 1937
Publication numberUS 2185353 A, US 2185353A, US-A-2185353, US2185353 A, US2185353A
InventorsOmohundro George D, Platt Gilbert G
Original AssigneeOmohundro George D, Platt Gilbert G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for packaging
US 2185353 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan, 2, 1940. G'. G. PLATT Er A1.

IETHOD AND AAPPARATUS FOR PACKAGING Filed Nav. 1. 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jmz, 1940. G. G. PLAT-r Erm. 2,185,353

IETHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING Filed Nov. l, 1937 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Jan. 2, 1940 UNITED STATES- PATENT OFFICE METHOD AND APPARATUS Fon. PACKAGING Gilbert G. Platt and George D. Omohundro,

-Santa Ana,v Calif.

This invention is an improvement in a method y.

of molding plastic or liquid substances including food products and for example, cheese, butter, butter substitutes such as oleomargarine, and other substances of similar physical characteristics into a wrapped block of suitable size and shape, as for example, the standard one-quarter pound block.

In the past an attempt has been made to W achieve this result by the use of several operations involving the molding of the mass, transferring the molded substance to a sheet of paper `and subsequently wrapping. This is at best a messy and time-consuming procedure and it is not adapted for use in small scale operations. The further objection is that room temperature is not suitable in most cases.

An object of this invention is to provide a device of a simple and economical construction that can be conveniently used to mold and assist in completely wrapping the substance without the necessity of removing the mass from the mold prior to wrapping.

Another object of the invention is to provide a suitable preformed wrapper adapted for insertion within the mold. A further object is provision of a. suitable wrapper formed with the aid of the mold.

Our invention, therefore, comprises a method and apparatus for molding and wrapping a plastic mass witha minimum of handling as hereinafter described. Other objects will become apparent as the description of the invention proceeds with particular reference to the drawings wherein:

Figure 1 shows a sheet from which our wrapper is formed, the ultimate folds being indicated by dotted lines.

Figure 2 shows one embodiment of the mold. Figure 3 shows the wrapper being inserted within the mold.

Figure 4 shows subsequent folding of the wrapper after being placed in position.

Figures 5 and 6 show a preformed wrapper partially collapsed and fully collapsed respectively.

Figure 'l shows the mold and wrapper ready for filling.

Figure 8 shows the overlapping wings swung around the end of the mold.

Figure 9 shows the nished package still in the mold.

The mold may be fashioned from metal or other rigid materials such as, for example, resin plastics or paper.

Resin plastics are particularly adaptable for use in constructing? the mold of our invention. M The use of this material permits a wide color range, is inexpensive and lends itself to imprinting of instructions, advertisement, etc. on the 5 mold. It has the added advantage of being easily cleaned and not being affected by water.

When constructed of sheet material the mold may be cut and bent into the shape shown in Figure 2. The side and end walls do not extend 10 the full length or width 'of the base portion leaving slots 28 at each corner permitting a portion of the wrapper to project therethrough as hereinafter described. 'The wrapping sheet max7 be of conventional paper, vregenerated cellulose, glassine paper, etc'. preferably suitably coated With an oil`resistant coating. It also may be of more durable material thus permitting its re-use. In a preferred embodiment, the following procedure is used: the sheet is initially folded along 20 the lines I; 2, 3 and 4 extended, the area enclosed by lines I, 2, 3 and 4 being slightly less than the area in the base portion of the mold. The four sides of the sheet are then turned-upward upon these folds bringing together folds 9 and I0, 25 II and I2, 5 and 6, and] and 8 respectively, resulting in projecting wings A, B, C and D. At this point, the wrapper is placed within the mold as shown in Figure 3 with the wings A, B, C and D projecting through the. slots 28 of the mold. 30

The next step is to fold the wings A, B, C and D outward and against the side walls of the mold causing new folds along the diagonal lines I3, I4, I5 and I6 as shown in Figure 4. The portions extending above the side wall of the mold then 35 `are folded outwardly and downwardly along the top line 29 of the mold and lines II and I8 of the wrapper thus forming flaps E and F which are held as in Figure 7 while the substance to be' molded is placed within the wrapper, using a 40 knife, paddle or similar device when the substance is plastic; the rigid mold supports the wrapping sheet during the lling operation.

After the desired amount of substance has been placed within the wrapper and supporting mold, 45 the extending aps E and F are folded upwardly and the overlapping wing portions, A, B, C and D, are swung around over the ends of the mold as shown in Figure 8. The portions of wings A, B,

C and D which extend over the top line of the 50 mold are now folded inwardly over the top line of the mold and along the lines 20, 2I, 22 and 23.

The side flaps E and F, extending a distance equal to more than one-half the width of the mold, are turned inwardly along the lines I'I and 55 I8 and pressed flrmly against the top of the molded mass forming new and final folds along lines 24, 25, 26 and 21, thus completing the wrapping of the substance as shown in Figure 9.

After the substancel has been brought to a consistency permitting handling, as for example by cooling when necessary, the completely wrapped block can be removed easily from the mold Without distortion of its shape. It is particularly pointed out that the mold has not been touched by the substance and` can be used repeatedly.

We have illustrated our invention with the use of an initially at sheet of Wrapper material but obviously a preformed wrapper as shown in Figures 5 and 6 may be used in which case the operation will begin as shown in Figure 3. 'I'he preformed Wrapper may be made with the aid of our mold or alternatively by the use of a suitable die wherein the folds are made by Wrapping the sheet outside of a mold or die and using the sequence of steps outlined above.

For various economic reasons, colored `butter substitutes are not generally available. Customarily these foods are marketed to the consumer in a substantially uncolored condition and accompanied by a capsule of suitable coloring matter. Within her home, it is necessary for the housewife to color the food by`stirring and kneading the mass in a bowl to form the homogeneously colored mass. Discriminating housewives heretofore have objected to table use of butter substitutes because of its inconvenience in handling and serving properly. This invention has been particularly advantageous in preparation of shaped blocks of colored butter substitutes and thereby materially increased desirability of their use on the table.

We claim:

1. In the method of molding and wrapping a block of plastic foodstuffs, the steps comprising supporting within a discontinuous mold structure a prefolded Wrapper fashioned fromfa single exible sheet to define five surfaces of a parallelepiped, extending wing portions of said folded sheet exterior of and above the discontinuous mold structure, retaining the wrapper in position b y folding all the projecting wing portions of the wrapper against two exterior sides of the mold structure, placing the said plastic material within the supported wrapper, folding corresponding pairs of projecting end wing portions .over each other and the exterior ends of the mold structure, and by means of a folding operation effecting a non-adhesive engagement between the free edges of the wrapper to enclose completely the plastic foodstulf.

2. In the method of molding and wrapping a block of oleomargarine, the steps comprising supporting within a discontinuous mold structure a prefolded wrapper fashioned from a single flexible sheet to define five surfaces of a parallelepi'ped, extending Wing portions of said folded sheet exterior of and above the discontinuous mold structure, retaining the wrapper in position by foldingall the projecting wing portions of the wrapper against two exterior sides of the mold structure, placing the said oleomargarine within the supported wrapper, folding corresponding pairs of projecting end wing portions over each other and the exterior ends of the mold structure, and by means of a folding operation effecting a non-adhesive engagement between the l' free edges of the Wrapper to enclose completely the oleomargarine.

GILBERT- G. PLATT. G. D. OMOHUNDRO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3184319 *Mar 27, 1962May 18, 1965Miami Margarine CompanyLined food package
US3939282 *May 7, 1973Feb 17, 1976Lever Brothers CompanyFood product
US5467887 *Aug 5, 1994Nov 21, 1995Kraft Foods, Inc.Expandable end closure for reclosable package
US6155479 *Jun 3, 1998Dec 5, 2000Stone Bridge CorporationSelf-erecting containers
US6253993May 6, 1999Jul 3, 2001Stone Container CorporationSelf-erecting container apparatus
USRE30086 *Sep 18, 1978Aug 28, 1979Lever Brothers CompanyPlastic emulsion food spread
Classifications
U.S. Classification426/663, 426/130, 229/87.8, 229/171, 426/414, 53/464, 229/186, 53/456, 53/578, 426/413
International ClassificationB65D75/14, B65D75/04, A01J21/02, B65B25/00, A01J21/00, B65B25/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/14, B65B25/06, A01J21/02
European ClassificationB65B25/06, A01J21/02, B65D75/14