Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2185492 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1940
Filing dateDec 13, 1937
Priority dateDec 13, 1937
Publication numberUS 2185492 A, US 2185492A, US-A-2185492, US2185492 A, US2185492A
InventorsBarrett Robert N
Original AssigneeBarrett Robert N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ornamental object
US 2185492 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 2, 1940. V R. R. BARRETT 2,185,492

ORNAMENTAL OBJECT Filed Dec.. 13, 1937 BARRETT INVENTOR.

, I i I* E BY' j' .rs porting itself.

. Patented Jan. 2, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT ori-TCE ORNAMENTAL OBJECT Robert N. Barrett, Houston, Tex. Application December 13, 1937, Serial No. 179,455

,9 Claims.

'Ihis invention relates to an ornamental object and to a process for making the same. It is an object of this invention to produce a sign, decorative pattern, ornamental block or the like having inlaid portions of different colors,

some of which may be transparent, and to provide a process whereby the colored portions may be made of any shape desired, and the various colors arranged in any manner desired.

Another object is to provide a method of making such a multi-color object without using extreme care in order to avoid mixing or intermix-l ing of the colors so used.

Another object is to produce an ornamental l5 member in which the main features of the design or ornament are molded, cast, stamped or otherwise formed from any plastic malleable material, or other material to form in one rigid piece a matrix strong enough to support itself 2o and which has depressions or recesses into which the various colored materials are filled or laid.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description of the invention pro ceeds.

A representative form of the inventionis illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 illustrates one side of the matrix before lling;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 showing the matrix after the side appearing in Fig. 1 has been lled with a colored material;

Fig. 3 illustrates the opposite face of the matrix shown in Fig. 1 before the depressions therein have been lled;

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view along the line 4t of Fig. 3 after the depressions in the face appearing in Fig. 3 have been lled with a colored material;

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1 after the matrix has been lled in from. opposite surfaces, being a combination of Figs. 2 and 4;

Fig. 6 shows the matrix of Fig. 5 in. which one of the surfaces has been ground o to expose all colors to that surface;

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 shows the matrix of Fig. 5 in which both surfaces have been ground ofi to expose all co1- '50 ors so that they are visible f rom both sides; and,

Fig. 9 is a vertical sectional view of Fig. 8.

In accordance with this invention, a shell or matrix l is formed of seme.plastic material, malleable material or composition capable of sup- The matrix may be formed of colored material and may be transparent if desired. It is formed by any of the die-forming processes well known in the art or it may be cast, molded or carved.

Viewing Figs. 1 and 2, the cavities or recesses 5 2 are formed in the process of making the matrix. These recesses correspond to the s hape and extent which one of the contrasting colored materials is to assume. In Figs. 1 and 2,l the recesses take the form. shown in Fig. 6 where the 10 recess is hatched for the color red. The recesses are then filled with the colored material 3,'which,` as shown in Fig. 6, is red.

Then the matrix is turned over to the position shown in Figs. 3 and 4, so that it rests on l5 the surface t. For illustration only, it is assumed that a sign depicting the letter B is being formed. The matrix in the position of Fig. 3 shows the letter B which letter of course has the same color as the material of the matrix. The 20 recesses t are now filled in with a third contrasting color l, blue, for example, as shown by the color hatching in Fig. 6.

The recesses 2 and 6, it is to be noted, do not extend from one surface t to the other surface 25 5, but they are of suilcient depth to retain a considerable amount of the colored materials. The bottoms of the recesses terminate short of the surfaces and 5, leaving a surface having some thickness. In other words, the recesses 30 extend substantially to the opposite surfaces of the matrix.

The recesses are lled in with the colored materials, usually by pouring the material in molten or plastic condition. The material is al1 35 lowed to harden and grip the walls of the recesses in the matrix.

The matrix is brought back to the positio'n shown in Fig. 5 and is ready for the operation wherein the Surface t is to be removed. Refer- 40 ring more particularly to Figs. 6 and 7, the surface t has been removed by grinding or some similar operation, so as to expose all three colors to that surface, that is, the color of the matrix, the red color of recesses 2 and the blue color of 45 recesses 6. l

Referring to Figs. 8 and 9, the surface 5 has been removed by grinding orv some similar operation, so that all three colors are visible from both sides.

The function of the matrix is to provide a form for the filled-in colored materials and to serve as the principal element of the decoration or design.

When both the surfaces are ground nfF to -.f

expose the filled-in materials, the matrix and the filled-in materials form an integral or solid structure wherein each and every color is of the same thickness from top to bottom. When the matrix or any of the lled-in colored materials are of transparent or translucent materials, it is obvious that light can penetrate therethrough,

recesses and then dropped into said recesses and secured to the walls thereof.

By employing the process herein disclosed, it

l is evident that each contrasting colored material need not be carefully placed in its respective recess to avoid overflow and mixing with adjacent colored materials, as is necessary in making ornamented objects of a similar nature in the prior art.

Instead of first making the shell or matrix as hereinbefore described, it is also contemplated by this invention that the inserted portions of the compositemember may be molded or pressed into the desired shape and then placed together with the material, which is eventually to form the supporting and combining member, in liquid or plastic form therebetween. stance the molded inserted portions in effect Aform a mold for shaping the part which is later to act as a frame and supporting member instead of the frame forming the mold for the colors as in the previously discussed form. It is also within the purview of this invention to mold such color parts by passing them between rotating cylindrical dies and to bring them into proper relation to each other by passing them between other rotating rollers, placing the supporting portion between them when they are in this proper relation. By this means a continuous process may be evolved and the process of making the articles contemplated by this invention grveatly accelerated.

Inthe annexed claims, I desire to claim all modifications of my invention which fall within the purview of its' generic spirit.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. The process of making a multi-color molded ornamental object which comprises employing a colored matrix of substantial thickness having parallel oppositely disposed working surfaces, each of said surfaces being divided into recesses,

vthe recesses of any one surface not extending through the other surface', filling the recesses on one surface with a material of one color, filling the recesses on the other surface with a material of another color and then effacing one of saidsurfaces to permit the colored material filled into the recesses of the other surface to be visible at said efaced surface.

2. The process of making a multi-color molded ornamental object which comprises employing a colored matrix of substantial thickness having parallel oppositely disposed working surfaces, each of said surfaces being divided into recesses, the recesses of any one surface not extending through the other surface, filling the recesses on one surface with a material of one color, filling the recesses on the other surface with a material of another color and then effacing both of said surfaces to permit the colored materials filled In this ininto all of the recesses to be visible at said eiiaced surfaces.

3. The process of making a multi-color molded ornamental object which comprises employing a colored transparent or translucent matrix of substantial thickness having parallel oppositely disposed Working surfaces, each of said surfaces being divided into recesses, the recesses of any one surface not extending through the other surface, filling the recesses on one surface with a material of one color and then filling the recesses on the other surface with a material of another color.

4. 'I'he process of making a multi-color molded ornamental object in which mixing of said colors is avoided and which comprises employing a colored matrix of substantial thickness having parallel oppositely disposed working surfaces, each of said surfaces being divided into recesses, the recesses of any one surface not extending through the other surface, filling the recesses on one surface with a material of one color, filling the recesses on the other surface with a material of another color, and then eiiacing one of said surfaces to permit the colored material filled into the recesses of the other surface to be visible at said eiaced surface.

5. The process of making a multi-color inlaid object comprising forming in the opposite-faces of a matrix depressions each extending more l than half of the thickness of the matrix, but less than the entireA thickness thereof, and having outlines corresponding to the outlines desired for those of the colors in the finished product, respectively, filling said depressions from the opposite faces of said matrix with different desired colors, and effacing one surface of the composite member so produced to expose the color filled in from the opposite surface thereof.

6. 'I'he process of making a multi-color ornamental object comprising forming into the desired configuration colored bodies of two of the colors which are to make up said object, placing said bodies in the complemental overlapping relationwith respect to each other which they are to occupy in the finished product, and withone face of each of said bodies projecting beyond the corresponding face of the other body, and molding between said bodies a third body adapted to unite and support in predetermined relation with respect' to each other said'first two bodies.

7. The process of making a multi-color ornamental object comprising forming into the desired configuration colored bodies of two of the colors which are to make up said object, placing said bodies in the complemental overlapping relation with respect to each other which they are to occupy in` the nished product, and with one face of each of said bodies projecting beyond the corresponding face of the other body, and molding between said bodies a third body of a different one of the colors which are to make up said object and adapted to unite and support in predetermined relation with respect to each other said first two bodies.

8. The process of making a multi-color inlaid object comprising forming in the opposite faces of a matrix depressions each extending more than half of the thickness of the matrix, but less than the entire thickness thereof, and having outlines,

surface of the composite member so produced to 'I5 expose the color filled in from the opposite surface thereof.

9. The process of making a multi-color ornamental. object comprising forming into the desired configuration colored bodies which are to form parts of said object, placing said bodies in the complemental overlapping relation with respeci; to each other which they are to occupy in the nished product. and with one face o! each of said bodies projecting beyond the corresponding face of the other body, and molding between. said bodies a third body adapted to unite and support in predetermined relation with respect 5 to each other said rst two bodies.

ROmT N. BARRETT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2434477 *Jun 27, 1944Jan 13, 1948Messrs Hornflowa LtdManufacture of moulded articles having differently shaded zones therein from moulding powders
US2511552 *Apr 26, 1948Jun 13, 1950Stuempges Clark LEngraving designs in bodies of transparent plastic composition
US2560117 *Jan 31, 1947Jul 10, 1951Robert W MallarySign
US2876574 *Oct 28, 1957Mar 10, 1959Powell Charles WMosaic tile and method
US2982042 *Apr 18, 1958May 2, 1961Gick James EOrnamental tile and method of fabrication
US4743410 *Mar 28, 1986May 10, 1988Siemens AktiengesellschaftMethod for manufacturing a flat illumination unit
US4835890 *Jun 26, 1987Jun 6, 1989Kenneth W. NelsonInterblocking plastic display
US5811175 *Jun 19, 1997Sep 22, 1998The Grigoleit CompanyMethod of manufacturing a composite article having a high clarity icon and the product produced by the method
US5942313 *Jul 6, 1998Aug 24, 1999The Grigoleit CompanyMethod of manufacturing a composite article having a high clarity icon and the product produced by the method
US6391243Jul 27, 2000May 21, 2002The Grigoleit CompanyMethod for manufacturing an indicator knob
US6491852 *Apr 20, 2000Dec 10, 2002Durite Concepts Inc.Method of making monolithic terrazzo floors having seamlessly integrated inlays
US6499191Jun 14, 2002Dec 31, 2002The Grigoleit CompanyKnob with a composite light pipe having a colored face and a light pipe
US6568036May 1, 2002May 27, 2003The Grigoleit CompanyComposite indicator knob and a method for manufacturing a knob
US7036188Mar 24, 2004May 2, 2006The Grigoleit CompanyComposite knob with light pipe leakage barrier
US7203998 *Mar 17, 2006Apr 17, 2007The Grigoleit CompanyComposite knob with light pipe leakage barrier
USRE37687Jun 23, 2000May 7, 2002The Grigoleit CompanyMethod for manufacturing an indicator knob and a knob
WO2000062995A1 *Apr 20, 2000Oct 26, 2000Durite Concepts IncMethod of making terrazzo floors with design elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/139, 264/246, 43/42.32
International ClassificationB44C1/26, B44C1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB44C1/26
European ClassificationB44C1/26