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Publication numberUS2186918 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 9, 1940
Filing dateSep 16, 1938
Priority dateSep 17, 1937
Also published asDE689897C
Publication numberUS 2186918 A, US 2186918A, US-A-2186918, US2186918 A, US2186918A
InventorsFranz Wolf
Original AssigneeFranz Wolf
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Overcoat
US 2186918 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. WOLF OVERCOAT Jan. 9, 1940.

Filed Sept. 16, 1958 INVENTOR \A/OLf ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 9, 1940 UNITED STATES OVERCOAT Franz Wolf, Vienna Germany Application September 16, 1938, SerialNo. 230,252"

In Austria September 17, 1937 2 Claims.

The hitherto known overcoats, that is to say raincoats and other overcoats which reach down to the knees, cannot offer a sufficient protection for the legs against rain, snow, dust and the like,

5 despite their length, owing to the fact that movement of the wearer such as walking, cycling, riding, etc., necessarily uncovers his legs or trousers,

. even if only intermittently.

It is already known that in order to overcome this disadvantage, the lower part of an overcoat can be provided with a central slit in the back, which can be formed in an emergency into a kind of sleeve-shaped covering for the legs, whereby the lower half of the overcoat is transformed into a kind of breeches: for this purpose a series of fastening parts is provided on the back part of the overcoat, which co-operate with a series of fastening parts arranged on the straight front edge of the overcoat. It has also already been proposed to arrange flaps lengthwise on both sides. of the entire central slit, that is to say from the top of the slit to the overcoats lower edge.

Both these proposals, however, suffer from considerable disadvantages. The mere buttoning together of the overcoat parts so as to form sleeves or trousers, does not give suflicient protection during movement of the wearer, whilst on the other hand it hinders his freedom of movement. In the latter proposal the fixed flaps are very big, and they must also be turned back to one side, when the overcoat is to be worn in the ordinary way (not made into breeches), because the flaps hang together at the top (the vertex of the slit). The result ofthe aforesaid is a very changed and clumsy appearance of the overcoat in its normal state, which is undesirable for town and sporting wear; however, in this state the back slit is covered by the turned over flaps, so that the stretching-of the legs is hindered and cycling or riding is rendered impossible.

In accordance with the present invention, the sleeve-shaped envelopes are formed only partially by'the back parts to be turned over, but also by back slit; theseflaps are arranged on both sides of the central slit in such a Way that they do not 5 ment of the wearer. It is of importance that the small triangular flaps which do not influence the By the aid of these flaps and of the suitable placing of the approximately triangular flaps are arranged only lengthwise of a part of the central slit and carry only a part of the fastening means, whilst the remaining fastening means are arranged on the rear side of the overcoat.

The invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawing, showing by way of example one embodiment:

Figure 1 shows diagrammatically the front view of an overcoat, in accordance with the invention; Figures 2 and 3 illustrate the formation of the sleeve-like envelopes for the legs in this overcoat.

In accordance with Figures 1, 2 and 3, the overcoat, the sleeves of which are indicated at A and the front parts at V, is provided in the rear part 15 R with the usual slit S. On the top of both sides of this slit are sewnapproximately triangular flaps L: these are normally folded back into the position shown in Figure 1, where they are fastened by the means indicated at I and 2, such 20 as press studs engaging into co-operating parts on the inside of the back R. These same fastening means I and 2 serve also for the formation of the leg coverings, but in this they are aided by other fasteners indicated atv 3 and 4, which are arranged approximately in a prolongation of the same straight line, on the outside of the back of the coat. The fastening parts I, 2, 3 and 4 are appropriately fixed upon the strips reinforcing the overcoat material, such as are illustrated in Figures 1 and 2 by shading. The counterparts I, 2, 3 and 4 co-operating with the fastening parts i, 2, 3 and 4 for the trouser formation are arranged on the inside of the front edge of the overcoat. 35

Figure 2 may be regarded as showing the overcoat in ordinary use, but it also serves to indicate how the rear part is turned round, bringing the fastenings I, 2, 3 and 4 into line with the co-operating elements I 2 3 and 4 40 For the formation of the tubular envelopes for the legs, the flaps L are unfastened and turned over. The fastening parts I, 2, 3 and 4 which are arranged partly on the rear side of the triangular flaps L and partly on the external side of the overcoat, form then a straight line which is brought into register with the front perpendicular overcoat edge, the fastening means I and I, 2 and 2 3 and .i and 4 and 4* being united.

What I claim is:

- 1. ma long overcoat the provision of means for enabling the lower front parts tobe secured to the lower rear part in order to produce tubular leg coverings,said means comprising a pair of tringular flaps secured one on each side of the I usual rear slit, adjacent the upper end thereof, the longest edge of each of the flaps being secured to the edge of the slit, said flaps extending downwards for less than the length of said slit, a row of fastening devices extending along the lower free edge of each said triangular flap and continuing in a line uponthe exterior of the back of the overcoat, and mating fastening devices fitted to each lower front edge of the overcoat, said flaps being adapted to fold inwardly against the interior surface of said coat when the flaps are out of use.

2. In a long overcoat the provision of means for enabling the lower front parts to be secured to the lower rear part in order to produce tubular leg coverings, said means comprising a pair of triangular flaps secured along one edge, one on each side of the usual rear slit, adjacent the upper end thereof, the longest edge of each of the flaps being secured to the edge of the slit, said flaps extending downwards for less than the length of said slit, a flexible strengthening strip extending along said lower free edge of each said triangular flaps and continuing through the rear lower part of the overcoat, fastening devices secured in line along said strengthening strip and mating fastening means upon the lower front edges of the overcoat, said flaps being adapted to fold inwardly against the interior surface of said coat when the flaps are out of use.

FRANZ WOLF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738512 *Dec 13, 1954Mar 20, 1956Winer Sportswear IncInfant's convertible garment
US2959788 *Aug 15, 1956Nov 15, 1960Justad Rosella SCoat and leg-protecting liner therefor
US4485493 *Sep 12, 1983Dec 4, 1984David LeinoffConvertible clothing article
US6360371Dec 11, 1998Mar 26, 2002Peter William DaveyConvertible wet weather garment
US7111328Feb 13, 2003Sep 26, 2006Robison's Inc.Hybrid ventilated garment
US7284282Jun 29, 2005Oct 23, 2007Robison's Inc.Hybrid ventilated garment
US7966668Aug 15, 2006Jun 28, 2011Sullivans, Inc.Ventilated garment
US8001618Sep 21, 2007Aug 23, 2011Sullivans, Inc.Ventilated double-closure garment
US8336116Apr 28, 2008Dec 25, 2012Angela Jodie Gomes SeguinGarment closure system
WO1999029197A1 *Dec 11, 1998Jun 17, 1999Davey Peter WilliamConvertible wet weather garment
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/86
International ClassificationA41D3/06, A41D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D3/06
European ClassificationA41D3/06