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Publication numberUS2188813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 30, 1940
Filing dateJul 30, 1937
Priority dateJul 30, 1937
Publication numberUS 2188813 A, US 2188813A, US-A-2188813, US2188813 A, US2188813A
InventorsHenry G King
Original AssigneeHenry G King
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 2188813 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 30, 1940. H. G. KING CONTAINER Filed July so, 1957 {:jNVENTOR.

BY a fi ATTORNEYS Patented Jan. 30, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT oFF cE CONTAINER Henry G. King, Lorain, Ohio Application July 30, 1937, Serial No. 156,535

5 Claims.

This invention relates to a container which is particularly adapted for the holding and filing of fiat objects. 7

, An object of the invention is to provide an improved container which may be effectively used as a means of storing objects.

Another object is to provide an improved container which will be simple in construction.

) Another object is to provide an improved container which may be easily used.

Anotherobject is to provide an improved container which will effectively disclose its contents. Another object is to provide an improved con- N tainer which will occupy little space.

Another object is to provide an improved container which will be neat and attractive in appearance.

Another object is to provide an improved container which may be easily and economically manufactured.

Other objects will hereinafter appear.

The invention will be better understood. from the description of one practical embodiment thereof, illustrated in the accompanying drawing,

25 in which;

Figure 1 is a perspective view of one form of container embodying the invention as it may be used for filing such articles as photographic films;

Figure is a perspective view of two of the containers of Figure 1, illustrating their appearance when in use; and

.Figure 3 is a plan view of a blank from which .the envelope of Figure 1 may be formed.

In Figure 1, the container is shown as made in the form of a rather narrow, elongated envelope consisting of a single sheet of paper, light cardboard, or other flexible thin sheet material, cut as shown in Figure 3, into agenerally cruciform 40 blank B which is then folded to provide a rectangular back I, a front flap 2, end flaps 3 and 4,

and a cover flap 5.

The end flaps are secured; as by suitable adhesive, to the side edges of the front flap 2, which 45 they may either overlie or underlie, as desired.

The cover flap is substantially coextensive with the front flap of the envelope, and so, in overlying the same, presents a smooth, continuous front surface to the assembled folded device.

5o Appliedto the front fiap is a band or strip of adhesive Bof any desired type, such as the gum ordinarily used for sealing envelopes. This band is of substantial width and terminates just short of the upper edge of the front flap and some distance above the lower edge thereof, the width of the strip being determined by the size of the articles which the envelope is to contain, or rather by the identifying articles which will accompany these.

As illustrating the type of article for which the device is particularly useful, I have shown a strip of developed negative film I, such as is produced by miniature cameras now in vogue, the strip illustrated being intended to represent a piece of moving picture camera film of approximately the size of a thirty five millimeter film, which is one size quite commonly used.

The envelope may be designed to hold a strip of any desired length, and I find it very con- M venient to insert in one envelope a strip of film containing six exposures, when the above mentioned size of film is used.

With such a piece of film, the band of adhesive 6 is proportioned tounderlie and secure to the envelope a series of prints of each of the exposures of the negative.

These prints, of course, may be readily made simultaneously on a single piece of printing paper, and secured in place merely by moistening the adhesive 6 to occupy the position indicated by the prints shown at 8 in Figure 2.

The front or outer side of the cover flap may be conveniently provided with inscriptions or blank lines, such as indicated at 9 in Figure 2, for identifying data relative the various exposures of the negatives contained within the envelope. Of course, such inscriptive matter may be placed on the back of the envelope instead of on the front, if desired.

While envelopes have been used heretofore for filing negatives, and some types of inscriptive matter have been applied thereto, there appear to be none in which prints showing exactly what pictures the negatives are capable of producing have been conveniently placed thereon.

These prints, it will be noted, occupy substantially negligible space, not materially increasing the thickness of the envelope, and are efiectively protected by the cover flap, but'easily accessible when a user is hunting for a desired negative.

The envelopes are small, but large enough to be easily handled, and are capable of compact filing. The prints and inscriptions are readily exposed to permit rapid location of any negative, andboth negatives and prints are eifectively protected. I

The invention has been illustrated as used with Celluloid film, however, it will be apparent that it is equally applicable to glass plates, photostatic negatives, slides, stencils, engraving plates,

or any other type of device capable of producing a copy or facsimile, and which is of such nature that the illustrations or lines thereon are not as readily apparent from the negative or pro-' ducing article, as they are from the object produced.

Such print or prints, copy, or facsimile is referred to in the claims as an article to be displayed.

While I have described the illustrated embodiment of my invention in some particularity, obviously many other embodiments, variations and modifications will readily occur to those skilled in this art, and I do not, therefore, limit myself to the precise details shown and described herein, but claim as my invention all embodiments; modifications and variations coming withi'n'the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In combination with a container inade of flexible material forming a pocket, adhesive material covering a substantial area of one external side thereof, an article to be displayed secured to said container by said adhesive material, and a flap movable to overlie said article.

'In combination with a container made of flexible material forming a pocket, adhesive material covering a substantial area of one external side thereof, an article to be displayed secured to said container by said adhesive material, and a flap movable to overlie said article and data-receiving spaces upon the side of the flap which is exposed with the flap arranged in position to cover the article.

3. In combination with a container comprising a single sheet of flexible material sealed and 5e cured together to form a pocket and flap to overlie one side of said pocket, a substantial area of said sheet externally of said pocket and which may be enclosed by the said flap being coated with adhesive material, and an article to be displayed overlying said area and secured thereto by,

said adhesive material.

4. In combination, an envelope comprising a sheet of paper or like material formed into a generally cruciform blank and folded, whereby a back and four flaps are produced, adhesive se-- curing three of the flaps together to form a pocket which may' be folded upon the fourth" 15 flap, a coating of adhesive material applied to the external surface of the pocket and arranged to be covered by the fourth flap, and an article to be displayed overlying said adhesive material and secured by it to the envelope. a

5. In combination, an envelope comprising a sheet of paper or like material formed into a generally cruciform blank and folded whereby a back and four flaps are produced, adhesive securing three of the flaps together to form a pock- "et which may be folded upon the fourth flap, a

coating of adhesive material applied to a broad substantial area on the external surface of the procket extending substantially the full width of the envelope ands'pao'ed from the opening of the G. KING.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2589604 *Mar 11, 1949Mar 18, 1952North American Aviation IncPackage and method of packaging
US2657791 *Dec 7, 1950Nov 3, 1953American Optical CorpSpectacle case
US2739702 *Jan 9, 1951Mar 27, 1956Hakon Eriksen LeifPipe cleaner
US3299928 *Oct 28, 1965Jan 24, 1967Eastman Kodak CoProtective wallet for photographic films
US3949935 *Aug 8, 1975Apr 13, 1976Photo Marketing Systems CompanyPhotographic print envelope having adhesive transfer tabs
US4034910 *Feb 13, 1976Jul 12, 1977Exclusive Envelope CorporationCombination advertising, coin and receipt holding envelope
US4568148 *Nov 3, 1983Feb 4, 1986Onanian Richard AHand-held collapsible microscope system
US4966285 *Mar 30, 1988Oct 30, 1990Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Container having index sheet and recording medium
US6227368Jan 13, 2000May 8, 2001Pakon, Inc.Sleeving material system for photographic negatives
US6349181Jan 13, 2000Feb 19, 2002Eastman Kodak CompanySleeving method for photographic negatives
US6375224Jan 13, 2000Apr 23, 2002Eastman Kodak CompanyIndex print for use in a positive sleeving system for photographic negatives
US6425483Oct 28, 1998Jul 30, 2002Eastmankodak CompanyPositive sleeving system for photographic negatives
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/449, 206/813, 40/363
International ClassificationB65D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/813, B65D27/00
European ClassificationB65D27/00