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Publication numberUS2189023 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1940
Filing dateDec 19, 1936
Priority dateDec 19, 1936
Publication numberUS 2189023 A, US 2189023A, US-A-2189023, US2189023 A, US2189023A
InventorsAyres Waldemar A
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Punching and printing device
US 2189023 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

FIGJ.

Feb. 6, 1940. w AYREs 2,189,023

PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEVICE Filed Dec. 19, 1936 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 DI-kl-N C)S? LYV. T

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PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEYICE Feb. 6, 1940.

7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR M Ai'TORNEY Feb. 6, 1940. w. A. AYRES PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEVICE Filed Dec. 19, 1936 FIG. 4.

7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR W. A. AYRES PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEVICE Filed Dec. 19, 1936 Feb. 6, 1940.

ATTORNEY a GM "W j M 1 h l A w s. wu u WQ.\: 0 Av mw, m9 & I mew W m3 v H. ow v v v .1 mu mm m @E a m w mm Q 1 mm 5w w. A. AYRES 2,189,023

PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEVICE Filed Dec. 19, 1936 Feb. 6, 1940.

7 She'ets-Sheet 5 FIG. 8.

as 10a 1 v 92 m 104 w 11 112 36 us we 53 n Ill I'll l s 5/ 141 42 I "9 a6 /47 w" v 12a 4' I23 '27 121 "6 INVENTOR 59 124 48 63 mad/,4

49 6! BY m ATTORNEY w. A. AYRES' 2,139,023

PUNCHING AND PRINTING DEVICE Filed Dec. 19, 1936 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 a, 2 6 w a 9 m m w a 8 qoomk @003 v.. H I. M A i m 6 I 1 f m 6 Q v m 4 G i o A T 4 6 i M l 3 a M 7:: W14 4 5 1.4! 1 II .u m ,n V

E 0 WW lNvElNToR I BY j M ATTORNEY Q Feb. 6, 1940.

FIGJS.

Patented Feb. 6, 1940 UNITED STATES PUNCHING PRINTING DEVICE Waldemar A. Ayres, New York, N. Y., assignor to International Business Machines Corporation, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application December 19, 1936, Serial No'. 116,695

36 Claims.

This invention relates generally to improvements in stenographic recording devices and more particularly to an improved key arrangement and mechanism controlled thereby for perforating or 1 printing a record strip at high speed.

An object of the invention is to provide a stenographic machine wherein alphabetic and numerical operating keys are situated in a novel and advantageous arrangement whereby printed in or perforated representations may be recorded in a rapid manner.

Another object of the invention is to so arrange the alphabet keys and the recording mechanisms controlled thereby so that the sequence 1 of letter representation from left to right agrees with the actual letter sequences in words, thereby producing correctly spelled representations of words.

Another object of the invention is the provision S of punching or printing means controlled by a stenographic keyboard to record a plurality of letters in correctly spelled formation in one operation. A feature of the invention lies in the means whereby a single downward stroke of one or both hands operates keys to record complete correctly spelled words.

Another object of the invention is to provide a stenographic keyboard wherein a plurality of designations are represented by each key with a 3 selective shifting means for choosin the signs,

numbers or letters desired. Thus there is provided a small number of keys with a large range of choice of letters so that correctlyspelled words or syllables thereof may be recorded in one operation. 3

A further object of the invention is to furnish a double set of vowel keys between sets of initial and final consonant keys so that words such as ffeed or door may be recorded in one opera- 40 tion. The number of vowel keys is reduced by using three keys. in combination to record the five characters. A feature of the invention is the compact arrangement of the threeyowel keys whereby one finger may depress two/keys to rep- 45 resent a third character; for examp le, the A and E keys may be depressed togethemby one finger to represent an I, and the E anti/"0 keys togetherrepresent a-U. I

A feature of the invention is the arrangement 50 of the space bars near the vowel keys so that a vowel key and space bar may be depressed together with one finger. Two vowel keys and a space bar may be operated by a single finger in a simultaneous representation of a combination vowel and a space.

An object ofthe invention is the provision of a keyboard controlled recording means wherein fre-.

quently occurring sequences of letters may be recorded simultaneously by the cooperation of one finger with two or three closely spaced keys. The

combinations SC, TH, SH, GL and FLY may be formed by the operation of one finger. Another advantage lies in the arrangement of shift bars close to a plurality of letter keys so that one or two keys and ashift bar may be operated together by a single finger.

A still further object of the invention is to provide key' controlled recording devices including three sets of keys operable by the fingers of one hand in natural positions; the sets being arranged directly behind each other with the sequence of recording control from left to right on the record I being first from left to right on the keys of the set furthest removed from the operator, then from left to right on the keys of the middle set, and finally from left to right on the keys of the front set.

A feature of the invention is'the provision of means for considering the finale" which occurs often in words and is-therefore provided for separately in addition to the intermediate vowels. It is also the object of this invention to provide separate double shift mechanisms, two for each hand, for greater selectivity of key selection.

The invention also provides means for feeding .a record strip single spaces between syllables or parts of a word and double spaces between the word.

The invention is illustrated by a set of drawings which form part of this specification.

In the drawings-:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a keyboard showing a desirable arrangement of keys.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of a keyboard with an improved key arrangement.

Fig. 3 is a perspective view showing the entire machine.

Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation view of a vowel printing mechanism.

Fig. 5 is an end view of three vowel key levers. Fig. 6 is a side elevation view of the key levers and the record feeding devices.

Fig. 7 is a side view of a double space record feeding mechanism.

Fig. 8 is a plan view showing the various offsets of the key levers.

Fig. 9 is a side view of the record perforating mechanism.

Fig. 10 shows a sample of a preprinted strip which is perforated in the machine.

Fig. 11 discloses an example of a record strip which is printed by the devices of the present invention.

Fig. 12 shows a portion of a strip which has been perforated and embossed.

Fig. 13 is a side elevation view of a character printing mechanism with double shifting connections to the type supports.

Fig. 14 is a side elevation view of perforating sp 119 fl 36 and embossing devices. str 118 my 33 Fig. 15' is a front sectional elevation view taken 01 106 z 26 along the line l5-l5 in Fig. 6 and showing the br 101 bl 24 key levers and connections to punch operating k 98 sch 23 toggles. wr 67 gl; 21 Fig. 16 is an elevation view showing vowel key dr '65 sf 11 control over punching mechanism. or 52 spr 11 The key arrangements shown in Figs. 1 and 2 sm 46 sw 11 are the result of an exhaustive study of the occurrence of English words and the sequence of letters in the words that are used most in business, literature and other fields of human activity. Starting with the data on word occurrence counts revealed in the book Relative Frequency of English Speech Sounds by Godfrey Dewey, and noting the consonant and vowel arrangement in the most frequently used words, data were compiled resulting in the improved keyboards disclosed. By means of these novel key arrangements it is possible for an operator to record most small words with a single depression of one or both hands. Words such as "the or and are recorded with a single movement of the fingers of one hand. Many larger words such as through{ or found are recorded with a single movement of both hands. Other words may be formed by two or three operations of the hands. Due to the ability to print a plurality of letters with a minimum amount of finger and hand movement, speedier operation results so that the disclosed keyboards may be operated so that a record is made more than twice as fast as the ordinary typewriter keyboard. Therefore, dictation may be taken directly as on a stenographic machine with the advantage thereover of a correctly spelled recording,

In the book mentioned hereinbefore there is given a basic vocabulary of 1,027 words comprising 78% of written and spoken English from the standpoint of frequency of use. In order to an alyze the occurrence of letters singly and in combination, each word was divided into syllables keeping in mind that they are to be recorded by a keyboard providing for initial consonants, single and double intermediate vowels, final consonants and a final "e. Following this, a frequency count was made by me to determine the occurrence of consonants, vowels, consonant combinations or vowel combinations as they occur in 100,000 words of written or spoken text. These frequencies are given in the following tables which I have compiled.

Initial consonants and consonant combinations by frequency of use in list of 1,027 words comprising 78% of written and spoken English per 100,000 words of text th 11,934 g 1,236 t 5,106 r 1,068 w 4,679 fr 586 h 4,219 sh 581 b 3,883 pr 403 m 3,623 tr 277 s 3,140 pl 258 f 2,942 kn 231 n 2,241 st 218 c 2,217 gr 211 y 1,946 ch 209 l 1,926 j 191 p 1,766 tw 189 wh 1,628 thr 167 d. 1,557 q 121 Intermediate vowels and vowel combinations by frequency of use in list of 1,027 words comprising 78% of written and spoken English per 100,000 words of text T e 21,762 au 192 a 20,733 ue 185 o 19,504 oi 159 i 16,020 ei 132 w. 3,447 e0 175 u 3,311 ca 117 ea 1,428 ia ee 1,146 cc 64 a1 668 ua 63 oo 598 ion 27 i0 538 eau 14 ei 513 cu 13 Final consonants and consonant combinations by frequency of use in list of 1,027 words comprising 78 of written and spoken English per 100,000 words of text r 8,283 nly 203 ff 43 n 8,019 bl 196 ls 43 t 7,035 x 194 rmy 43 s 6,404 1y 191 1k 39 f 4,756 pl 175 dg 35 nd 4,105 ck 157 sy 34 m 2,714 ttl 149 rth 33 d 2,441 g 148' nths 32 y.;.; 2,381 ty 138 rl 32 nt 963 ft 106 nth 24 st 928 nds 106 vy 21 l 908 rld 103 ngth 19 id 889 ntry 92 bly 18 c 836 lly 91 bt 18 ch 783 dy 90 fty 18 p 724 ngs 82 mp1 18 k 639 sk 82 rls 18 ry' 558 ws 75 rds 18 ght 505 nst 73 rms 17 -rs 412 ps 72 11s 15 ss... 406 1 sh 72 nc'y 15 ny.. 344 m 68 tly 15 ns 323 it 67 sm 14 rt 311 cts 59 lv 13 ct 282 nts 54 mply 13 wn 270 h 1 53 ndly 13 gh 255 rc 53 ngl 13 rd 232 rts 51 z 13 bi 229 as 49 ckly 12 Int--- 228 ks.- .9 cks; 12 ys.; 227 r150 9 rks 12 ts 220 nty 46 typ 12 nc.. 215 pt 45 up 11 l 208 xt 44 rv 11 Final e combinations with final consonants by frequency of use in list of 1,027 words comprising 78% of written and spoken English per 100,000 words of text the 7,479 pre 90 re 2,277 nge 58 ve 1,226 rce 53 me 1,144 nte 48 se 665 nse 44 ne 566 pa 41 cc 488 rse 40 be 426 rge 38 de 421 whe 31 kc 318 dge 24 te 299 mple 18 she 188 ye 18 ple 187 lse 1e 164 lve 13 ttle 149 ngle 13 ble 128 ze l3 fe 115 dle 12 ge 99 type 12 nce 93 rve 11 Final consonant combinations with an apostrophe,

by frequency of use in list of 1,027 words comprising 78% of written and spoken English per 100,000 words of text We observe from these tables that, in this basic list of 1,027 words constituting 78% of writte and spoken English, there are:

a. 49 diifering initial consonants and consonant t combinations.

b. 25 intermediate vowels and vowel combinations.

0. 119 different final consonants and consonant combinations, q

d. 10 diflerent final consonant combinations requiring an apostrophe (not including possessives) e. 39 different final consonant combinations having a final e.

The keyboards disclosed were designed with the foregoing requirements in mind. To keep the number of keys small, three cases are provided, a

normal and two shifts giving three characters or controls per key.

Certain character keys are carefully repeated and arranged in sequential order so that varying sequences such as ST as well as TS,or LT instead of TL maybe recorded with ease.

The results revealed in Figs. 1 and 2 were derived by printing the characters and combinations appearing in the tables and repetitions thereof on separate cards and then, by arranging and re -arranging the cards, the probable sequence, frequency and repetition were found with which the characters are most likely to be found in words. The placement, of the frequently required characters under the more dextrous fingers is also a factor that was considered. Dexterity was assumed to vary, with the index finger being the most facile, thesecond finger next, then the tions were encountered where a compromise was necessary between one or more of the factors, sequence, frequency, repetition, shift location and location for dexterity, hence the diiference between Fig. 1 and Fig. 2. Generally speaking, the arrangement of Fig. 2 was planned with greater attention to the placement of the frequently required characters and combinations under the more dextrous fingers so that greater ease and speed of operation may be secured. The frequency tables show the need for the final e in almost of the frequently used words. The provision of this "e in the most advantageous place is a novel feature derived from the fre,

- quency tables and incorporated in both key ar- The keys are arranged as simply as possible for ease in memorizing and ease of combinational fingering since writing speed is dependent upon these features.

In order that the fingers may easily reach all keys with short vertical movements, the keys and control are arranged in a compact formation,

Provision is made for numerals, special signs, capitalization, spacing, paragraphing, tabulation, punctuation and error correction as well as inserting or deleting sections of text.

The four fingers of the left hand must write 49 different initial consonants and consonant combinations. The two thumbs must write vowels and vowel combinations. And the four fingers of the-right hand must write 119 different final consonants and consonant combinations, 10 com-- binations including an apostrophe, and 39 combinations including a final e. 1

The operating sequence of the consonant keys is from left to right and by rows from the top to the bottom row. Thus, in Fig. 2 it is seen that the-left hand finger operating sequence is SJ GPMCFBTWDLYHR. The printing or punching sequence from left to right across the paper tape (Figs. 10 and 11) is first an. error start column, next an error stop column, then 15 columns of initial consonants, then a column for left vowels and a column for right vowels, next 15 columns of final consonants and at the right end a column for a space notation. From the foregoing it may be seen that a tape 35 columns wide as :equired to receive the perforated or printed Although most of the letter combinations are recorded in one operating stroke, certain combinations require two strokes. However, the keyboards are designed so that the combinations requiring more than one stroke are ones that occur infrequently. The keyboard shown in Fig. 2 is adapted to record all initial consonant combinations with only one stroke. 'All except two of the intermediate vowel combinations may be recorded with one stroke. These vowel combinations are the three letter groups iou and eau which seldom occur in written or spoken words. 01 the 119 final consonant combinations all except 13 may be recorded with one stroke. They are the infrequent combinations ys, ntry, if, an, ID. y. bly, fty, mp1. mp y. c WP. and mi y of which may be recorded with two strokes.

The two keyboards shown are similar in construction and operation, the only difference being in the character arrangement on the keys, the 75 depress the A key alone.

preferred arrangement being the one in Fig.2. The description that follows refers to the keyboard of Fig. 2 although it is clear that the other keyboard may be used in the same fashion.

In Fig. 2 the normal positions of the hands are such that the fingers of the left hand cover keys F, B, T and W, and the thumb is over the left E key. The fingers of the right hand cover keys C, G, M and T with the thumb over the right E key. Short movements of any finger to the rear or forward places it in cooperation with other keys. Thus the right index finger may move from the C key to the R key or to the T key. The small finger of the right hand may be moved back and forth and slightly to the right to depress the T, Y, D, H, E or S keys.

The thumb is shifted forward a short distance to coincide with both the E and A keys to designate an I, and slightly further forward to In a similar manner, a short rearward movement of the thumb places it over both the E and 0 keys to record a U, and further movement positions it to coincide with the 0 key alone.

Either of the thumbs is to be used to depress the space bar 20 or 2! when a complete word or the end of a word is recorded. This may be done along with the depression of vowel keys or independently thereof. Thus a thumb may depress a single vowel key, two vowel keys to record a third vowel (as illustrated by the dotted circle 22) a vowel key and the space bar (circle 23) two vowel keys and the space bar (circle 24) or the space bar alone. Each thumb has eleven operating positions to cover the combinations mentioned.

Each finger key may record any one of three characters, a normal character, or one of two shift characters selected by shift bars 25, 26, 21 and 28. The shift 1 bars 25 and 26 are operated by the index fingers of the right andleft hands, respectively; and the shift 2 bars 21 and 28 are depressed by the small fingers of the right-and left hands, respectively. The shift bars may be operated alone or in combination with one (circle 29) or two (circle 30) of the consonant keys. Shift 2 bar 23 selects the characters depicted on the upper left corners of the consonant keys in the left group, while shift 1 bar 26 selects the characters shown on the upper right corners of the same keys. For example, if the W key is depressed with the bar 28, an sign is recorded, if the same key is depressedwhen bar 26 is operated, an N letter is recorded, and of course if the W key is depressed without operating either shift bar, a W" is selected. If the F key is depressed with bar 26, a back spa ce sign may be recorded, or such control may be selected, as denoted by the abbreviations BK. SP.

' on the top right-hand corner" of the F key.

Shift ,1 bar 25 selects the characters lettered on the upper left corners of the consonant keys in the right hand group, while shift 2 bar 21 associated with the same keys selects the characters shown on the upper right comers. 'If the M key is depressed with the bar 25, an L is recorded, and if the same key is operated with bar 21 a is recorded, I

There are places on the keyboard where a single finger cooperates with two or three letter keys to record syllables, letter combinations or simple words. For example, the second finger of the left hand depresses the T and H keys together (circle a 3 I) the small finger. of the right hand may record HE (circle 32) and the third finger of the left hand may be positioned and operated to record the word FLY (circle 33) An Error start bar 34 and an Error stop bar 35 are positioned to be operated by the heels of the left and right hands, respectively.

From the foregoing it may be noted that in the operation of the stenographi'c keyboards disclosed, the hands maintain their position while the finger tips move short distances from home positions with a touch system form of operation. Such a fast mode of operation is impossible in prior art structures involving large numbers or keys and keys widely spaced, necessitating the-operator's visual supervision of the placement of the hands and fingers when such attention could be more profitably directed in another direction to a page of written matter or a speaker.

In Fig. 6 it is seen that the tops of all keys and bars are in the same horizontal plane so that the fingers may move rapidly back and forth over them.

The disclosed keyboard mechanism is adapted to operate different devices for forming various kinds of perforated and printed records. Mechanisms are disclosed herein for the production of three forms of record strips; a pre-printed perforated strip 34 such as that shown in Fig. 10, a printed strip 35 as disclosed in Fig. 11, or a perforated and embossed sheet 36 such as the one revealed in Fig. 12. The machine for producing the perforated strip 34 shown in Fig. 10 will be described first.

The mechanism is mounted between a pair of side frames 31 and 38 (Figs. 6, 8 and 15) fastened to a base plate 39 supporting a casing 40. Two sets of pivotally mounted key levers are fulcrumed on a pair of shafts 4| and 42 secured to the side frames. Vowel key levers 43, error start lever 44. error stop lever 45 and a space lever 46 are pivoted on the lower shaft 42 while all the consonant key levers 41 and shift levers 48 and 49 are pivoted on the upper shaft 4|. Because of the many crossings of the upper set of levers to bring their ends into position for punch control, five offset positions are provided as shown in Fig. 15 which is a section taken on the line l5l6 in Fig. 6. A ball connection 50 is made between the left space bar 20 and the space operating lever 46.

The levers are raised and held in normal position by two sets of springs 5| and 52 attached thereto. These springs are suspended from rods 53 and 54 fixed between the side frames. 'I'he upper edges of the key levers abut against shock absorbing stops 55 and 56 fastened to the casing. Slotted guide plates 51 and 58 confine and guide the levers and act as limiting stops for the downward movement thereof. Spacing collars 53 on the pivot shafts also serve to control the horizon tal position and the vertical movement of the levers.

All the keys cooperate with a sheet feeding means for moving the record strip 34, Fig. 10, a distance equal to the space including three of the pre-printed lines of characters every time a combination of keys is depressed. For this purpose a rod 60 (Figs. 6 and 8) turning on bearings in the side frames 31 and 38, carries a short arm 6| and a long lever 62, both attached to the rod. Be-

tween arm 6i and lever 62 are fixed a pair of bail:

stud 81 protruding through a slot 88 in a vertically movable feed ratchet slide 89. Aspring 18 attached to stud 81 at one end and fixed to a stud I I on the bottom of slide 89 at the other end, tends to make the slide follow the'upward movement of the lever 82 whenever a key or combination of keys is depressed. The upward movement of the slide 69 is limited by a set screw 12 which passes through a lug I3 on the left frame 31. The end of screw 'I2f0rms a variable abutment for an extension 14 on the side of the lower end of slide 89.

The feed operating slide 89 is guided in its vertical movement by a pair of studs I5 and I8 extending through slots 11 and 18 in the slide. These slots are slightly wider than the stud shoulder with much free play between them. This is done so that ratchet teeth 19 on the side of the slide 89 may escape freely over the teeth on a ratchet wheel 88 on the upstroke of the slide. There is provided a spring 8| tensioned between the slide and lever 82 for the purpose of drawing ratchet teeth 19 into engagement with the strip feeding wheel 88.

A stop pawl 82 cooperates with wheel 88 to prevent it from turning in a clockwise direction along with the upward movement of slide 89; but on the downstroke of slide 69, teeth 19 engage in a positive'way with the teeth on wheel 88 and turn said wheel in a counterclockwise direction under the I influence of the strong spring 85. At the same time, the spring, through the lever 82 and bars 83 and 64, acts to lift the key levers and restore them to the normal position.

The paper strip 34 (Fig. 6) is drawn from a roll 83 mounted on a shaft 84 removably held in through an opening in the rear of the cover 48. a f

The paper rollers 85, 88 and 89 are mounted on shafts 9|, 92 and 93 that pass through the two side frames, shafts 9| and 93 being fixed in the frames (Fig. 15) and shaft 92 turning therein so that feed roller 88 may be operated either automatically by the ratchet wheel 88 on the left end of the shaft, or manually by a hand knob 94 at the right end of the shaft.

' Ratchet wheel 88 does not operate feed shaft 92 directly; instead it turns the shaft through frictional engagement with a clutch disk 95 keyed to a slot in the shaft. A spring cupwasher 92 presses the disk into constant engagement with the ratchet wheel 88. The wheel is held on the shaft by a washer 96 fastened with a screw 98 in the end of the shaft. Whenever wheel 88 is turned in a counterclockwise direction by slide 89, the wheel turns disk 95 which is fastened to the shaft 92 also fixed to roller 88 for feeding the tape. I

Because of the slip clutch connection to the paper feed drive, the record strip may be turned backward even though the pawl 82 (Fig. 6) prevents clockwise movement of the ratchet wheel 88. Whenever it is desired to retract the strip for the purpose of punching an error startor error stop signal, for making written notes over table 98. or for any other reason, knob 94 may be manipulated to turn shaft 92 directly. The knob may also be turned to feed the strip forward if it is desired to skip certain areas on the strip- There is no hindrance to such counterclockwise movement (Fig. 6) of wheel 88 because both slide 89 and pawl 82 move out of the path of the ratchet teeth when the wheel moves that way. When the strip is retracted, roll 83 may be turned by hand to keep the paper taut against dle plate 88 and' around roller 85.

In Fig. 9 there is shown the mechanism for punching thirty-three of the thirty-five columns of character positions shown on the strip 94 in Fig. 10. This mechanism also includes the shifting control devices for selectively punching in one of three places along each column. The other two of the thirty-five columns on the strip are the two center columns devoted to the representations of vowels, the controlling mechanism for which is described herein after first considering the punching of consonant and special sign designations. I t

In Fig. 10, the distance X is the extent of strip feed after each key depression. It is seen that within this space of feed there are three lines of preprinted characters under which one or more perforations I88 may be punched. These perforations may appear under any or all of the three lines of characters to represent a word or part of a word registered with one depression of the operator's hands. Each perforation may be identified by the character directly above it. Thus the word The" and a space may be recognized by noting the four characters above the first four perforations in the sample strip shown in Fig.10.

The strip feeding devices are adjusted by turning the set screw I2 (Fig. 6) to limit the feed to the extent X (Fig. and by starting punch operation with the strip positioned so that the top line of characters thereon appears directly abovea 'top row of die openings I8I (Fig. 9) in the die plate 88. Two other rows of die openings I82 and I83 are cut in the die plate, there being thirtyfive openings in each row. Normally cooperating with the center row of die openings is a series of thirty-three punch plungers I84 divided into two i sets with seventeen plungers in the left set in a guide block I85 shifted by the shift keys 28 and 28 operated by the left hand, and sixteen plungers in the right set in a similar guideblock which is shifted by the shift keys 25 and 21 associated with the right hand. The left set of plungers represent the fifteen initial consonant keys, the error start and the error stop keys; while the right set of plungers represent the fifteen final consonant keys and the space bar. Cooperating with the two center sets of die openings is a vowel representation punching mechanism (Fig. 16) which differs from the consonant punching devices of Fig. 9 in a manner described hereinafter.

Turning again to consideration of the consonant punches (Fig. 9) it is noted that each plunger I84 is normally retracted by a coil spring I88 which presses between a shoulder on the plunger and a stop extension forming an abutment in the slot through which the plunger slides. The front part of each plunger I84 is widened into a foot I81 in the path of an operating slide I 88 loosely mounted in a rectangular bar I89" fixed between the side frames. There is one such slide I88 for each punch plunger. Pivotally mounted on the end of each slide I88 is one link I I8ofapair of toggle links M8 and III loosely Joined by a pivot at 2, The other end of link III turns on a fixed fulcrum rod II3 mounted between the main side frames. Encircling the pivot I I2 of the toggle is the slotted end II4 of an operating link II5 attached to a related key lever 41 by a stud II6. There is provided a sep arate link H5 and connected pair of toggle links H and III between each of the consonant, error and space keys and the related punch operating slides I 08 as clearly shown in Fig. 15.

Whenever a consonant lever 41 is operated, the related link I I is pulled down with the result that the connected toggle links are straightened out and the operating slide I08 is moved tothe left to push the punch plunger I04 through the record strip 34 and the die opening I02. As the key is released, spring 5| lifts the lever 41 and link I I5 which then lifts the toggle center II2 to retract the slide I08 and allow the plunger I04 to move back out of the die plate 86. A stripper plate I" holds therecord strip 34 against the die plate so that it does not follow a retracted plunger.

Slot H4 is provided at the upper end of each link 5 to allow an interval of time to elapse before the link is efi'ective'to operate the toggle and push the plunger through the strip. It is during this time interval that a shift mechanism may be made effective to move plungers I04 so they line I hind it in position for operation by the right 7 hand shift levers while the shift parts shown'are operated by the left hand shift levers 48 and 49.

Pivoted at II8 on lever 48 is a shift operating pawl II9 with a hooked end that is adapted to .engage a pin I extending from the side of a shift cam I2I rockable on a shaft I22--between the side frames. A similar oppositely facingpawl I23 is pivoted at I24 on shift lever 49 and adapted to engage a pin I 25 extending from the'side of the cam I2I opposite to the side from which the other pin I20 extends. Springs I26 and I2! pull the pawls H9 and I23 against cam rods I28 and I29, respectively, so that normally the upper ends of both pawls are outof the path of the upward swing of pins I20 and I25. Therefore either pawl may engage its associated pin to pull it down and rock the cam I 2I' without interference by the other pawl.

A spring I30 attached to cam I2I tends to hold it in a centralized position and draw it back there when rocked in either direction by the pawls.

The cam has three concentric cam surfaces, an upper surface I 3|, a normal central surface I32 and a lower surface I33. A roll I34 on 'a cam follower arm I35 normally rests on the central surface I32 as urged by a spring I36. The fixed end of the follower arm I35 is pivoted on a shaft I31 while the swinging end of the arm is articulated to a link I38 pivoted to a depending extension I39 on the punch guide block I05.

Whenever the shift 1 key lever 49 is depressed. pawl I23 is pulled down and as it moves down a cam face thereon cooperates with rod I29 to rock it slightly in a clockwise direction so that the hooked end engages over pin I25 to pull it down and rock cam I2I in a counterclockwise direction. The cam then acts to lift arm I35 until roller I34 rides on the top surface I3I. With the arm I 35 in alifted position, link I38 is raised and the guide block I05 is carried along therewith to bring the plungers I04 in alignment with the die openings IOI. Since the shift operation of the guid block I05 occurs early in the, depression of the key levers, plungers 104 are properly aligned with either of the three rows of die openings before the slides I08 push them through the record strip 34. It isnoted that the rear upper and lower edges of slides I08 are extended to cooperate with plungers I04 in any of the three shift positions they may occupy.

An example of the shift 1 control by bar 26 (Fig. 2) may be examined by assuming that the W key is depressed along with bar 26. Then cam I2I (Fig. 9) is operated and the block I05 is lifted, as already explained, so that the plunger in line with the twelfth column (Fig. 10) on the strip 34, instead of punching a hole under the W as it would without a shift, now punches a. hole under the N.

Turning again to Fig. 9, it is apparent that the depression of shift 2 key lever 48 carries the attached pawl II9 alon'g down therewith. A cam face on the lower end of the pawl cooperates with a rod I28 to rock the pawl in a counterclockwise direction so that the hooked end engagesover pin I20 to pull it down and rock cam I2I in a clockwise direction. The follower arm I35 then drops until roller I34 rides on the lower concentric'cam a sample operation in which it is assumed that the J key (Fig. 2) is depressed along with the shift 2 bar 28. Then the cam -I2I (Fig. 9) is operated and the block I05 is lowered, as already explained, so that the plunger I04 cooperating with the fourth column from the left of strip 34 (Fig. 10) instead of perforating under the printed J, punches a hole under the 2.

It is noted on Fig. 2 that each key in the consonant groups is designated with two selective shift characters printed near the two upper corners of the keys. These characters are placed on the side nearest the shift bar that selects them. Thus, on'the W key, the sign'near the upper left side is selected by the shift bar 28 at the left,

- and the N letter printed near the right side is Selected 'by the shift 1 bar 26 at the right of the group. And in the right group on the M key, the

bar 25 at the left and.the is selected by the bar 21 at the right.

It is understood that in addition to the shift mechanism controlled'by bars 26 and 28 appearing in Fig. 9, there is another similar and yet independently operated shift mechanism directly behind it. This other shift mechanism is provided with a separate guide block I05 and connections to the right hand shift bars 25 and 21. Therefore, one hand may operate the related consonant keys for normal depression or depression with either shift'bar, while the other hand independently selects a shift or normal operation in cooperation with its consonant keys. Of the two sets of punch plungers, either may be aligned with one of the three rows of die openings, while the shift mechanisms, the selectivity of consonant keytimes.

The plunger guide blocks I 05, Fig. 9, are guided in a vertical direction by four slotted ways I40 fixed to a rectangular bar I H fastened between the side frames. Each'block has two depending extensions I42 which fit into the ways I40. The extensions may be of dovetail section to aid in aligning the punch plungers.

The vowel keys (Fig. 16) control another form of punching mechanism which is independent of the shift devices. The crossbar I09 is widened at the center and formed with a web I43 which carries six bellcranks I44, three on each side of the web. The bellcranks are arranged in a stepped formation on pivots I45 so that the top crank is connected to the A key lever 43 by a link I45a, the center crank is connected to the E key lever 43 by link I45e and the bottom crank is connected to the key lever 43 by link I450. Attached to the rear of bar I09 is a punch holder I41 carrying three pairs of vowel punch plungers I45 which extend to the right through bar I09 and into cooperation with the ends of the vertical arms on the bellcranks I44. The top pair of plungers are operable separately or together by the top pair of bellcranks connected to the two A keys, the center pair of plungers are operated by the connections to the E keys and the two' lower punches are pushed by the 0 keys. Coil springs I49 press between shoulders on the plungers and shoulders in the holder I41 so that the punch plungers are restored in unison with the restoration of the key levers 43 by springs 52.

From the foregoing description of the vowel punch construction, it is made clear that any one or any combination of the six vowel plungers may be operated to pass through the die plate 85 and punch vowel representations in the record strip 34. In Fig. 10 it is seen that in the first word punched, the E perforation appears alone. In the second word, both an A and an E are punchedin the same column in order to represent the I of the word KIND. And for the third word an E is punched in one column and an O in the next column to represent the E0 of the word PEOPLE. Y

The space control perforation is placed in the extreme right hand column on the record strip 34, Fig. 10. It is punched under control of either of the space bars 20 or 2| (Fig. 2) byconnections such as those shown in Fig. 9. Since the space terminating in the keys 34 and 35, Fig. 2. -Usually, before the error start key is depressed to point out a place on the record strip 34 that should be omitted by the transcribing machine, it isnecessary to turn the knob 94 (Fig. 15) to reverse the strip tobring it back to the place where the erroneous matter begins. For this purpose a glass window I50 (Fig. 6) is placed over an opening in the cover 40 so that the operator may watch for the place where an error start or error stop perforation is to be punched and then adjust the strip so that the place is arranged properly over the die plate 55.

Many words may be represented by perforatlons within the single space X devoted to three preprinted lines of index points. Such words are fingers of one hand. The next word KIND is punched with one stroke of both hands. The third word must be divided into two parts; the

. first part PEO being perforated with a stroke of both hands, and the second part PLE is most easily fingered by the operation of both hands.

Other longer words require variable numbers of strokes and hand operations according to the number of letters and the arrangement of them in the word.

A modification of the stenographic devices is also disclosed herein. In this second form of the machine a record strip 35 is printed such as the sheet shown in Fig. 11. There it is noted that instead of perforating holes in a strip 34 (Fig. 10) which may be used later to control a printing machine, the printed matter is placed directly on the strip under control of either of the keyboards shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In Fig. 13 it is seen that the key lever and shift mechanism for the printer modification is the same as it was for the perforating devices in Fig. 9, therefore there is no need to repeat much of this description. However, it may be noted in Fig. 13 that a shifting guide block IP carries three sliding type slugs I54 with three type faces; also that a platen I5I has been substituted for the die plate. The platen I5I is loosely mounted on a shaft I52 between the side frames and it supports two record sheets, the top original strip 35 which may be backed with a carbon surface, and a second duplicate record strip 35a. An inking ribbon I53 is held in front of strip 35 to record the impressions of the type.

The type slug I54 slides in block I05P and has three extensions thereomthe middle one of which is formed with shoulders cooperating with a coil spring I55 and the end operating slide I 08.

. There is provided three such slugs for each of the keys in the consonant groups and the error start, error stop, and space keys. All type slugs operated simultaneously, print in a single horizontal line in alignment with the center line of the platen. The slugs may be shifted up or down but the printing position is at the horizontal line behind the ribbon I53. Assuming that the W type slug is shown in Fig. 13, itis clear that operation of the shift 1 controls with the W key will serve to raise the block I05? to place the lower type face which depicts N opposite the ink ribbon. Operation of the shift 2 devices with the same'W key serves to lower the type slug so that the upper type face is positioned to print. All shifting takes place before the operating link II5 has straightened out the toggle links H0 and III sufliciently to move slide I08 and push the slug I54 firmly against the ribbon I 53 andrecord strip are a'pair of combination-arms I59 and I50 (Fig.

5) each carrying pivoted thereon a wire HI and a pendant I52 hanging therefrom. These pendants are placed between the three vowel keys so that if two adjacent vowel keys are depressed together arm I59 or arm I66 is carried along therewith. For example, if the A and E levers are depressed together, the left pendant I62 (Fig. 5) is caught between them and the connected combination arm I59 is carried along down with the levers. So also, if the E and O levers are depressed together, the right pendant pulls arm I66 down. If any one of the vowel levers is operated alone, the pendants are swung aside and the combination arms remain undisturbed.

The lower part of arm I59 extends down with a shoulder I63 and arm I66 is formed with a lowered shoulder I64. These shoulders complete a progression of five shoulders I56, I51, I58, I63 and I64 spaced differential distances from the horizontal portion of an operating bail I65 pivoted on an arm I66 and a sector I61 attached to a shaft I68. Springs I69 pull the arms I59 and I66 up against a fixed stop rod I16 to hold them raised in a normal position as levers 43 are raised by springs 52. Another spring "I attached to sector I61 urges it upward against a fixed stop rod I12 to position the attached bail I65 so that the horizontal portion is directly under the lowest shoulder I64. The sector I61 meshes with a pinion I13 attached to a cam I14 loosely pivoted on shaft I22. A follower lever I15 loosely pivoted on shaft I 31 carries a roller I16 resting on the periphery of the cam. The outline of cam I14 is raised in five successive concentric steps to correspond with the five varying extents of movement imparted to the cam through the connections to the five differentially spaced shoulders I56, I51, I58, I63 and I64. Shoulder I64 operates the cam through the largest angle, and shoulder I 56, being normally the furthest removed from bail I65, operates the cam the least amount,

' while the other three shoulders cause varying spacing between the two extremes. Roller I16 follows the steps on the cam and accordingly lifts the end of lever I15 which has a pin and slot connection I11 to a vertically movable type bar I18 carrying five vowel type I19. Attached to pin I11 is a spring I86 which pulls the type bar down and holds the roller I16 against cam I14. Each of the type I19 is retracted by a small coil spring I8I pressed between extensions on the type and the type bar.

The top type is the A type, the second is an E type and the thirdis the 0 type. The type are so arranged because it is in that order that the shoulders I56, I51 and I58, respectively, cause upward movement of the type bar. When both the A and E keys are operated, the left pendant I62 pulls down the arm I59, and the shoulder I63 thereon'pulls down bail I65 to swing sector I61 and turn cam I14 so that the fourth step on the cam profile underlies the roller I16. Arm 115 when so adjusted, lifts type bar I18 to put the I type in printing position opposite the center of the ribbon I53.

The bottom type member I18 which is the U- type is adjusted to an effective position when both the E and 0 keys are operated to depress the arm I66 which is formed with the bottom shoulder I64.

A stationary slotted member I82 forms a-guide and retainer for the vowel type bar, a portion of which extends into the groove of the member.

The type I19 are impressed against the ribbon I63, duplicated strips 35 and 35a, and platen I5I by a plunger I83 sliding in bar I69. Pivoted on the end of the plunger is a. link I84 which is articuiated on a stud I85 with another link I86 rocking about the fixed shaft H3. The two links form a toggle connection from the center point of which there hangs an operating link I81. At

the lower end, this link I81 is bent to form an pushed to make an impression. A spring I88 pulls up on stud I85 to retract-plunger I83 and condition the toggle and link I81 in readiness for another printing operation.

Two vowel printing mechanisms, such as shown in Fig. 4, are provided at the center of the sternographic printing machine between two consonant printing mechanisms like that shown in Fig. 13.

In Fig. 11 it may be, seen that short words such as'TI-IE or KIND may be printed on one line, while the word PEOPLE requires two lines. Certain words or part of a word may be printed with a stroke of one hand while others call for the use of the fingers of both hands. It is also noted that the spacing Z between parts of a word is only one-half as wide as the spacing Y between words. The wider spacing is produced by a special feed mechanism for the printing modification of the stenographic recorder. It becomes effective whenever a space bar is depressed along with other keys for the. printing of a complete word or the last part of a large rod.

Fig. '7 discloses the special feeding devices for separating printed words on the record strip 35. There it is seen that the paper feed ratchet wheel 86, the retaining pawl 82, the operating slide 69 and the adjustable stop 12 are all the same as the feeding elements described hereinbefore with reference to Fig. 6. However, the feed operating ball arm 62a is different because its pivot point on rod 66a is situated nearer the rear of the machine so that the arm has a narrower swing when the bail is operated by levers 43 and 41. This change is made because the ordinary spacing Z (Fig. 11) on the printed tape 35 is much narrower than the spacing X (Fig. 10) on the punched tape 94. A shorter swing of the end 61 (Fig. 13) of lever 62a results in a smaller upward movement of slide rack 69 and consequently a narrower rocking movement of ratchet wheel 86 and the feed shaft 32.

The devices for producing the wider spacing Y (Fig. 11) between words are also shown in Fig. '7. Whenever a space bar 26 or 2| is operated, with orwithout an accompanying operation of character levers, a. printer space lever 46a is rocked downward about the lower pivot shaft 42. Bar 2| is connected to lever 46!: through a crosspiece 5611. A stud I 9| on lever 46a extends through a slot I92 in a link I93 hanging from a bellcrank I 94 pivoted at I95. A spring I 96 draws the bellcrank I94 back against a stop stud I91, while another spring I98 between link I93 and stud I9I tends to hold the lever 460. up and the stud I 9| against the upper end of slot I92. Pivoted'to the upper end of bellcrank I 94 is a link I99 which is connected at its other end to an am 266 loosely pivoted on feed shaft 92. The arm 266 carries a pawl26l cooperating with movement of crank I84 is provided in the form of a screw 202 in a boss 203 on the side frame 81.

Whenever space lever 48a is depressed, link I93 is pulled down, bellcrank I84 is rocked in a clockwise direction,link I99 is pulled down and to the right, arm 200 is rocked to the right, and pawl 20l ratchets idly over the teeth on wheel 80. Bellcrank I94 then stops against the end of screw 202, but lever 46a may be depressed further because of the pin I91 and slot 182 connection and the flexibility of spring I88. Release of the space bar permits lever 48a. to rise and the entire linkage to be restored as urged by spring .196. During such restoration, the pawl 20! positively engages the teeth on the wheel to turn it and the feed shaft 82 so that the printed strip 35, Fig. 11, is fed the distance Y.

This amount of feed is about twice the spacing Z produced through the operation of slide 88 by the character keys. Although the space bar and character keys are operated and released together, and the pawl 20I (Fig. 13) and the rack 19 cooperate with wheel 80 together, there is no conflict in the operation because for part of the restoration cycle, both the pawl and the rack tend to turn the wheel and then, when the rack stops, the pawl continues to turn the. wheel to feed two spaces instead of one.

At the end of sentences or other places where it may be desirable to feed three spaces or a distance on the strip 35 equivalent to space Y plus space Z, this may be accomplished by releasing the character keys and space bar seriatim. Either one may be released first and then the other directly thereafter with the result that pawl 20l will operate for two spaces and slide 19 for one space, separately, the total amount of feed equaling three ordinary spaces.

A third form of stenographic recording mechanism is disclosed herein for the production of a combination perforated and embossed record strip such as the strip 36 shown in Fig. 12. There it is noted that underneath each character perforation there appears an embossed letter showing what the perforation represents. Instead of all letters being preprinted on the strip as they are in the example of Fig. 10, only those letters pertinent to the data represented by the strip are recorded in Fig. 12. The perforations and embossings are recorded on the strip in one operation by punch plungers 205 (Fig. 14) with embossing faces 206. The devices for controlling the operation of the punch plungers 205, include the keyboard, keylevers, paper feed, shift devices and punching means, all of which are the same as the mechanisms described hereinbefore with reference to Fig. 9 and other figures disclosing means for making the record shown in Fig. 10. The only differences besides the shape of the punch plungers 205 is in the arrangement of these embossing plungers and the use of an interposer 201 to operate them. Instead of the plungers being mounted on a shifting guide block 105E, they are placed in a fixed bar 208 while the interposer 201 rides up or down according to the shift.

There are provided thirty-three columns of plungers 205 with three plungers in each column, in addition to two center columns of special vowel plungers described hereinafter. The three plungers of each column coincide with the die openings I0ll03 in the plate86 so that when any plunger is pushed to the left, Fig. 14, the front cutting edges will perforate a rectangular hole in the strip 36 and at the same time the embossing face 206 will press the strip between it and a resilient insert 86a in the plate 88 to leave a character impression in the paper. Coil springs 208 in bar 208 restore the plungers.

The thirty-three interposer slides 201 are divided into two groups each mounted in a separate block 105E; seventeen of them being in the block associated with the left hand shift mechanism and initial consonant group of keys, and

sixteen being in the other block moved by the right hand shift mechanism and the final consonant group of keys. The interposers are normally positioned between the middle plunger 205 and the operating slide I08. If a shift 1 type of operation is selected by depression of lever 49, pawl I23 is pulled down, cam l2l is-turned counterclockwise and guide block 105E is lifted so that the interposers 201 are raised to make the top plungers effective. Should a shift 2 kind of operation be desired, lever 48 operates pawl H8, cam |2l is turned in a clockwise direction and block IE is lowered so that the interposers are brought into alignment with the bottom row of punch plungers.

Operation of any character key serves to pull down the connectedv link H5 and straighten the toggle H0, III to push the slide I88 to the left,

and push the interposer 201 and the selected plunger 205 before it. Springs 2l0 restore the interposers when the toggle mechanism is restored by spring 5|.

Between the left and right sets of embossing plungers 205 there are mounted two columns of six vowel plungers. Since these plungers are to be operated in combination to represent I and U they cannot be operated by an interposer be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes in the form and details of the device illustrated and in its operation may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention, therefore, to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is as follows:

1. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order SJGPMCFBTWDLYHR;

A, E,-I, O or U, A, E, I, O or U, and

RNIDSCGMTH'I'LSYE from left to righton the record sheet.

2. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order KNVZQ: A, E, I, Cor U, and A, E, I,Oor U, and

from left to right on the record sheet.

3. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order KNVZQ; A, E, I, O or U, and A, E, I, O or U, and

from left to right on the record sheet.

4. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order SJ GPMCFBTWDLYHR;

A, E, I, O or U, and A, E, I, O or U, and

WCBPXNSLFTRVKSE from left to right on the record sheet.

5. In a machine for recording letter representations on a recard sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order GBTHS'FLWRPCDMY; A, 'E, I, 0 or U, and A, RI, 0 or U, and

' RMDSSLPLTYBNFRE from left to right on the record sheet.

6. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters, and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order JVKZQN; A, E, I, O or U, and A, E, I, O or U, and

WGXTSNCSLVRTHKE from left to right on the record sheet.

'7. In a machine for perforating letter representations in a record strip, a keyboard including keys representing the letters SJ GPMCFBTWDLYHR A, E, I, O or U, and A, E, I, O or U, and RNLDSCGMTHTLSYE, and perforating devices under control of one or more of said keys for perforating said strip with a horizontal line of perforations in the order given from left to right.

8. In a machine for perforating letter representations in a record strip, a keyboard including keys representing the letters KNVZQ; A, E, I, O or U, and A, E, I, O or U, and

and perforating devices under control of one or more of said keys for pegorating said strip with a horizontal line of perforatfons in the order given from left to right.

9. In a machine for perforating character representations in a record strip which is preprinted in sections repeatedly as follows:

acters, a plurality of lines of characters in each set, a keyboard with keys representing the characters preprinted, each key representing characters in more than one line, means for selecting in which line each key is to be effective, and means under control of said keys and said selecting means for perforating one or more perforations each near a selected preprinted character.

11. In a stenographic machine a keyboard consisting of three groups of keys positioned to be operated by the fingers and thumbs of both hands of an operator, a left group of keys comprising fifteen keys arranged in three arcs with the five keys in each arc corresponding to the position of the finger tips, a center group of six keys arranged in two sets of three keys in a column, each set operated by a thumb, a right group of keys comprising fifteen keys arranged in three arcs'with the five keys in each arc corresponding to the positions of the finger tips, and means under control of said keys operated singly or in combination for recording data represented by the keys.

12. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record strip under control of the fingers of an operator, a line of letter representing members arranged from left to right across the strip in the order that the letters occur in words, a keyboard with separate keys for operating said members, said keys under control of each hand being arranged in three successive arcs corresponding with the are formed by the natural position of the finger tips, the extreme left key of the top are being related to the memher at the extreme left of the strip and .the other key relationships following in order to the'right along the top are, then starting from left to right along the center are, and continuing from left to right along the bottom are, and means under control of the keys for operating the related members to make a record on the strip.

13. In a stenographic machine" forreco'rding letter representations on a record strip, a; series of letter recording elements extending across the machine in theorder that they occur in words, the element at the extreme rightrepresenting a final e, a keyboard comprising a plurality of keys operable singly or together, and means under control of the keys for operating related elements to place one or more letter representations on said strip.

14. In a stenographic machine for recording letter representations on a record strip, a keyboard including a group of consonant keys at the left, sets of vowel keys in the center and another group of consonant keys at the right,-a series of letters representing elements arranged across the machine from left to right in the order that the respective letters occur in words with a final e element at the extreme right,

means under control of said keys for operating said elements to represent related letters on the record, one of said right consonant keys controlling the operation of said final e element.

15. In a machine for recording character representations on a record sheet, means for recording a space designation on said sheet, a pair of character keys operable by one finger either singly or together, a recording means under control of said keys for recording representations of one of three characters according to the operation of said keys and a spacebar situated near said pair of keys to beoperated by the same finger either alone, together with one key, or together with both keys to control said space recording means sheet.

16. In a machine for recording character representations on a record sheet, means for feeding said sheet, a pair of character keys operable with an operating digit either separately or simultaneously, a recording means under control of said keys for recording a representation of one of three characters according to the -key operation, and a space bar near both of said keys in position to be operated by the same digit either alone, together with one key or together with both keys to operate said feeding means.

17. In a stenographic machine for perforating character representations in a record strip, two adjacent sets of punch plungers each set ar ranged in alignment, two sets of bellcranks mounted on a common support and positioned to operate the plungers, two sets of keys, key levers operated by the keys, links connecting the bellcranks to the levers for operation thereby, and a die plate behind the strip through which the plungers may be pushed to perforate the record strip.

18. In a recording machine for printing character representations on a record strip, three keys operable singly or in pairs, three key levers operated by said keys, a pair of pendents suspended between the levers, each of said pendents being pulled down when the related pair of levers are operated; a pair of arms on which said pendents are suspended to pull the arms down, a differential mechanism cooperating with thethree levers and two arms to be operated to five different extents according to the keys operated, a set of five character type, a platen, a typebar carrying said type and having connections with said differential mechanism so that one of the five types is brought into printing position with respect to the platen by the differential mechanism every time keys are operated, and means under control of any depressed keys for pressing the selected type against the strip and the platen after the type is in printing position.

19. A keyboard for a stenographic machine comprising a group of keys bearing the letters SJ GPM CFBTW DLYHR at one side of the cehter of the keyboard representing singly or in combination initial consonants and prefixes of words, and another group of keys lettered RNLDS I CGMTH TLSYE at the other side of the keyboard representing singly or in combination final consonants and suflixes of words, and acentral group of vowel keys I AA EE O0 senting singly or in combination initial consonants and prefixes of words, and another group of keys lettered at the other side of the keyboard representing singly or in combination final consonants and sufilxes of words.

21. A keyboard for a stenographic machine comprising a group of keys bearing the letters GBTH SFLWR PCDMY at one side of the centr of the keyboard representing singly or in combination initial consonants and prefixes of words, and another group of keys lettered RMDSS LPLTY BNFRE at the other side of the keyboard representing singly or in combination final consonants and suffixes of words.

22. A keyboard for a stenographic machine comprising a group of keys bearing the letters Q at one side of the center of the keyboard representing singly or in combination initial consonants and prefixes of words, and another group of keys lettered NCSLV at the other side of the keyboard representing singly or in combination final consonants and suffixes of words.

23. In a stenographic machine for recording word representations on a record strip, a keyboard with keys operable singly or in combination, devices under control of said keys for recording representations of a word or part of a word on each line of said strip, means under control of said keysfor feeding said strip from line to line comprising a feed roller and connections to said keys through a friction clutch, a space key with connections for operating said feeding means, means for recording an error start representation on said strip, means for manually operating said feed roller in the reverse to the normal feed direction to bring the strip back into a position to receive the "error start representation, and means for recording an error stop representation on said strip.

24. In a stenographic machine for perforating character representations in a record strip, a key representing three characters, two shift keys operable with the character key to select one or the other of two characters other than the character normally represented by the key, a die plate with three openings representing the three characters, a punch plunger cooperating with one of said openings to perforate said strip, means under control of said character key foroperating said plunger, a cam for shifting said plunger out of anormal position to cooperate with either of the other two openings, a pawl operated by one of said shift keys to turn said cam in one direction to shift said plunger to select one opening, and another pawl operated by the other shift key to turn said cam in the other direction to select the other opening.

25. In a stenographic machine for perforating character representations in a record strip, a key representing three characters, two shift keys operable with the character key to selectone or the other of two characters other than the character normally represented by the key, a die plate with three openings representing the three characters, three punch plungers cooperating with said openings to perforate said strip, an interposer cooperating with one of said plungers and adapted to be shifted to cooperate with either of the other two plungers, means under control of said character key for operating said interposer to actuate the cooperating plunger, means under control of one of said shift keys for shifting said interposer to cooperate with the second plunger, and means under control of the other of said shift keys for shifting said interposer to cooperate with the third plunger.

26. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order GBTHSFLWRPCDMY;

AEIO or U, and AEIO or U, and

WGXTSNCSLVRTHKE,

from left to right on the record sheet.

27. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters and recording devices controlled by said keyboard to place the representations of one or more letters in the order JVKZQN;

AEIO or U, and AEIO or U, and

RMDSSIPLTY'BNFRE from left to right on the record sheet.

28. In a machine for perforating letter representations in a record strip, a keyboard including keys representing the letters GBTHSFLWRPCDMY; AEIO or U and AEIO or U, and

RMDSSLPLTYBNFRE,

and perforating devices under control of one or more of said keys for perforating said strip with a horizontal line of perforations in the order given from left to right.

30. In a machine for perforating character representations in a record strip which is preprinted in sections repeatedly as follows:

a keyboard including keys representing the char-,

acters shown, perforating devices operated by one or more of said keys simultaneously for punching perforations in the strip near the sehind said record strip, a plurality of superimposed sets of separate letter embossing members movable towards said dies and arranged from left to right across the machine in the order that the letters occur in words, and means under control of any of said keys for simultaneously impressing related embossing members in any of the plurality of lines against said strip to form a record.

32. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record strip under control of the fingers of an operator, a line of letter representing members arranged from left to right across the strip in the order that the letters occur in words, a keyboard with separate keys for operat-- ing said members, said keys under control of each hand being arranged in three successive rows, the extreme left key of the top row being related to the member at the extreme left of the strip and the other key relationships following in order to the right along the top row, then starting from left to right along the center row and coning -mechanism cooperating with said keys for selectively associating one of a plurality of said elements with a related key, and means under control of the keys for operating related elements to place one or more letter representations on said strip.

34. In a machine for recording character representations on a record sheet, means for recording a space designation on said sheet, three vowel keys operable by one finger either singly or in combinations of two, a recording means under control of said keys for recording representations of one of five characters according to the operation of said keys and a space bar situated near said vowel keys to be operated by the same finger either alone, together with one key, or together with two keys to control said space recording means so that it places a space designation on said sheet.

35. In a machine for recording letter representations on a record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters comprising a group of keys bearing the letters said letters representing ingly or in combination letter consonants and parts of words, and recording devices controlled by said keys to place the representations of one or more letters in the order SJGPMCFB'I'WDLYHR on said record sheet.

36. In a machine for recording letter represaid letters representing singly or in combination sentations on a. record sheet, a keyboard for setting up the letters comprisin bearing the letters RNIDS CGMTH TLSYE g a group of keys letter consonants and parts of words, and recordingdevlces controlled by said keys to place therepresentations of one or more letters in the order RNIDSCGM'I'H'I'LSYE on said record sheet.

= WAIDEMAR A. AYREE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US8678685Jan 18, 2011Mar 25, 2014Advantage Technology And Innovations, Inc.Stenographic keyboard device providing extended set of keys and method for electronically adjusting key depth sensitivity
US8770872Jan 18, 2011Jul 8, 2014Advantage Technology And Innovations, Inc.Adjustable stenographic keyboard device and method for electronically adjusting key depth sensitivity
US9211724May 23, 2014Dec 15, 2015Advantage Technology And Innovations, Inc.Adjustable stenographic keyboard device and method for electronically adjusting key depth sensitivity
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US20110110696 *May 12, 2011David SiebertAdjustable Stenographic Keyboard Device and Method for Electronically Adjusting Key Depth Sensitivity
US20110116854 *May 19, 2011David SiebertStenographic Keyboard Device Providing Extended Set of Keys and Method for Electronically Adjusting Key Depth Sensitivity
US20110123244 *May 26, 2011Portia SeelyStenographic Keyboard Device Providing Extended Set of Keys and Method for Electronically Adjusting Key Depth Sensitivity
Classifications
U.S. Classification400/93, 234/37, 400/135, 400/686, 400/132, 400/613, 400/140
International ClassificationB41J3/26, B41J3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41J3/26
European ClassificationB41J3/26