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Publication numberUS2189273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 6, 1940
Filing dateJun 29, 1938
Priority dateJun 29, 1938
Publication numberUS 2189273 A, US 2189273A, US-A-2189273, US2189273 A, US2189273A
InventorsShomaker Wesley P
Original AssigneeShomaker Wesley P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Envelope
US 2189273 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. Fell 6, 1940- w. P. sHoMAkER 2,189,273

v ENvELoPE Filed June 29, 1938 lNvENTOR /aZeg .2? omakf www ATTORN EY Patented Feb. 6, 1940 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 5 Claims.

My invention relates to improvements in envelopes, and to means for opening sealed envelopes; and it relates more particularly to those single and double envelopes in which offerings in the form of coin, currency, or cheques are usually enclosed. When such envelopes are sealed by the old and usual means, it is a lengthy task to open a large number of them and to remove the contents. It would be a different matter to simply tear the envelope apart; but in many cases this would prolong rather than shorten the work, because, on the face and back of the envelope there are usually printed headings indicating the destination of the offering, quota'- tions, and a numeral identifying the giver. It is' most desirable therefore not to destroy the envelope until the offering has been extracted, and its destination and the number of the giver have been recorded. 1

Other envelopes have been designed with a similar object in View; but many have failed because of the cost of manufacture, or because the envelope had 'some feature which interfered with the perfection of the printing on the face and on the back of the envelope. Others have been unpopular 'because they have been no easier to open than is an envelope with an ordinary closure.

If the flap of an envelope is gummed and is held down to its very edge, it requires more or less time to insert a paper opener or a finger nail under the ap in order to raise lt.

If the ap has a V-shaped outline, and the V be left ungummed, we then have either an insecure fastening; or the point of the flap is held down.

But the ap with a -V outline is objectionable for the reason mentioned above. If a line of printing crosses the point of the flap the pressure of the type is much greater on the flap than it is on either side of the flap; and consequently the impression of the line of type is not uniform. This is the case whether the impression be made on the face or on the back of the envelope; because, at the V we have three thicknesses of paper, while on either side of the V we have two thicknesses of paper. Consequently, on whichever side of the envelope the type is impressed, the counteracting pressure of the paper stock is uneven. For this reason, as well as for the sake of economy in material, it is desirable that the outline of the flap be rectangular, and that the bottom or free edge of the flap be in line with and parallel to the lines of printing upon the envelope.

The objects of my invention are to provide an envelope which shall be useful; which shall be low in cost ofv manufacture; which shall be the same in outline and cut of paper forboth the single and the double types of envelope; which shall present an even surface for the printing; which shall be easily opened; and which can be rapidly opened, whether it be of the single or the double type.

These objects I attain in the envelope shown in the drawing; in which- Figure I shows the completed envelope, open;

Figure II shows the same envelope, closed;

Figure III shows the envelope blank, cut and gummed, before folding;

Figure IV shows the closed envelope about to be opened;

Figure V shows the envelope after it has been opened.

In Figure III the numeral 2 indicates the paper blank which when folded will take the shape shown in Figure I (open) and in Figure II A(closed). Assume that we are looking at the inside surfaces of the envelope; then 3 is the inside of the back of the envelope; 4 is the inside of the front of the envelope; 5 is the mouth flap; and 6, 6 are the end flaps, all of said iaps being integral with the front wall 4.

In the back of the envelope, 3, I cut a tab 1. This I do by means of a steel hollow punch having a cutting or punching edge 8'shaped as a semicircle, or in any other suitable form. The cut is short; barely more than a semicircle, the diameter of which is about eleven-sixteenths of an inch-more or less. The upper end of the cut forming the tab is about on the line of the edge of the mouth flap when the envelope is closed; see Figure II. 'Ihe portion of the back wall 3 immediately above the cut forms the base portion of the tab.

On the inside of the mouth ap I place av narrow strip, or a series of dots, of gum, I0.

On the inside of the back, 3, of the envelope, and at its two ends, I place narrow strips or dots of gum, I 2, which, when the envelope is folded and closed will be made to adhere to the end aps 6, 6. If the envelope blank be now folded we shall produce a single envelope; that is, an envelope having a single pocket the full length of the envelope. y

On the inside of the back of the envelope, and at the middle of its length, I place a short strip, or a dot, of gum, above the tab l, indicated at I4; while below the tab l, and adjacent thereto, I place a strip or dots of gum I6. On the tab itself there is no gum. The gum at I4 and I6 is indicated by dotted lines in Figures I and II. The gum I4 and I6, and the tab 1 are in the medial line of the envelope extending from top to bottom as shown.

The difference between the single and the double envelopes is that in the former the gum at I4 and I6 is not used. In the case of a large order of single envelopes, this gum would not be used at I4 and I6 at all. But it is also possible to place gum at I0, I2, Il', and IB; allow the gum to dry; and then at any time prepare single envelopes by folding and dampening only the gum at I2; or double envelopes by dampening the gum at I2, H, and I6.

In some cases double envelopes are perforatedusually down their middle or, central linesso that the two halves may betorn apart and yet have two completely sealed envelopes. The perforations I8, Figures I and II, being made down the central line on which the adhesive is applied at Il and I6; when the halves of the envelope are separated, the separated edges will still be sealed together; and each half will have a half of the tab I. The separation may be eected before or after opening. 'I'he tab 'I, which is cut in the back wall of the envelope, is exposed below the edge of the flap 5 of the closed envelope, and normally lies in the same plane as the back wall 3 to provide an even surface for printing. If the envelope be taken in hand, and it be bent, ever so slightly, along the line of its length (see Figure IV), the tab will rise from the back of the envelope; and it then be readily seized by the finger and thumb of the other hand. A pull on the tab in a direction away from the bott om of the envelope will lift the entire flap 5; and at the same time the base portion of the tab will be torn from the back wall 3 of the envelope; though it remains held to the flap 5 by the gum I0. Note that the tab 1 is just so wide, and consequently its adhesion to the gum IU so strong, that when its base portion is torn from the back of the envelope and from the gum at I4, it remains attached to the flap 5. This re-opening of the envelope is shown in Figure V.

What I have said of the tab I remaining gummed to the inside of the flap 5 when the envelope is opened, is equally true of the half tab and half flap when the envelope is torn along the perforations I8 before the envelope is opened. Whether the envelope be a single pocket envelope or a double pocket envelope there is only one tab; and the operation of opening the envelope is the saine in either case.

I claim:

1. An envelope including a front wall and a back Wall, a flap integral with the front wall and adapted to be folded over the back wall to cover a, portion thereof, a free tab cut from the back wall and so located therein as to be exposed for grasping when the ilap occupies its above indicated covering position, said tab having a base portion integral with the back wall and so located as to be covered by the flap when the latter is in the aforesaid covering position, and adhesive means provided on the envelope and so located as to operate as a fastening means between the ilapand the aforesaid base portion, whereby, when the flap is fastened to the said base portion, the flap may be freed from the back wall by grasping the free tab and tearing out its base portion from the back wall.

2. An envelope including a front wall and a back wall, a flap integral with the front wall and adapted to be folded over the back wall to cover a portion thereof, a free tab cut from the back wall and so located therein as to be exposed for grasping when the flap occupies its above indicated covering position, said tab normally lying in the same plane as the back wall whereby an even printing surface is presented but adapted to be projected from said plane for grasping by bending the envelope, said tab having a base portion integral with the back wall and so located as to be covered by the flap when the latter is in the aforesaid covering position, and adhesive means provided on the envelope and so located as to operate as a fastening means between the ap and the aforesaid base. portion, whereby, when the flap is fastened to the said base portion, the flap may be freed from the back wall by grasping the free tab and tearing out its base portion from the back wall.

3. An envelope including a front wall and a back wall, a flap integral with the front wall and adapted to be folded over the back wall to cover a portion thereof, a free tab cut from the -back wall and so located therein as to be exposed for grasping when the flap occupies its above indicated covering position, said tahhaving a base portion integral with the back wall and so located as to be covered by the nap when the latter is in the aforesaid covering position, a spot of adhesive joining said base portion to the front wall on a medial line of the envelope extending through said tab, adhesive means joining portions of the front fand* back walls together on said medial line at a portion thereof adjacent to but spaced from said tab and on the opposite side of the tab from said spot of adhesive, and adhesive means provided on the envelope and so located as to operate as a fastening means between the iap and the aforesaid base portion, whereby, when the flap is fastened to the base portion, the flap may be freed from the back wall by grasping the tab and tearing out its base portion from the back wall.

4. An envelope including a front wall and a back wall, a flap integral with the front wall and adapted to be folded over the back wall to cover a portion thereof, a free tab cut from the back wall and so located therein as to be exposed for grasping when the flap occupies its above indicated covering position, said tab normally lying inthe same plane as the back wall whereby an even printing surface is presented but adapted to be projected from said plane for grasping by bending the envelope, said tab having a base portion integral with the back wall and so located as to be covered by the flap when the latter is in the aforesaid covering position, a spot of adhesive joining said base portion to the front wall on a medial line of the envelope extending through said tab, adhesive means joining portions of the front and back walls together on said medial line at a portion thereof adjacent to but spaced from said tab and on the opposite side of the tab from said spot of adhesive, and adhesive pro' vided on the envelope and so located as to operate as a fastening means between the flap and the aforesaid base portion, whereby, when the flap is fastened to the base portion. the flap may be freed from the back by grasping the tab and tearing out its base portion from the back wall.

5. In a quick-opening envelopeA having a closure flap on its front wall, foldable over the rear wall to close the opening of said envelope, a cutout pulling tab in the body of said rear wall, below the free edge of said flap, the uncut portion of said rear wall adjacent said tab forming a securing web for said tab, said web being so located as to lie beneath said flap when the latter is closed, amd a limited area of gumming on said "flap substantially in line with said pulling tab, whereby when said tab is pulled upwardly, said flap will be pulled therewith to open the envelope.

WESLEY P. SHOMAKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2535537 *Apr 25, 1947Dec 26, 1950Us Envelope CoEnvelope
US2603410 *Jun 29, 1949Jul 15, 1952True Associates John Service CMailing piece
US4607749 *Apr 1, 1985Aug 26, 1986American Envelope Co.Easy open envelope
US4984733 *Sep 7, 1989Jan 15, 1991Uarco IncorporatedDual mailer construction
US5656492 *Feb 12, 1993Aug 12, 1997Brigham And Women's Hospital, Inc.Cell induction device
US5984167 *Jul 15, 1998Nov 16, 1999Rock-Tenn CompanyEnvelope with tab locks and cassette holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/307, 229/69, 229/81, 229/72
International ClassificationB65D27/08, B65D27/36, B65D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D27/36, B65D27/08
European ClassificationB65D27/08, B65D27/36