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Publication numberUS2190793 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 20, 1940
Filing dateApr 8, 1937
Priority dateApr 8, 1937
Publication numberUS 2190793 A, US 2190793A, US-A-2190793, US2190793 A, US2190793A
InventorsVincent Lombardi
Original AssigneeLombardi Knitting Machine Co I
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted fabric
US 2190793 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Feb. 20, 1940. v LQMBARDl 2,190,793

KNITTED FABRIC Filed April 8, 1937 5 sheets-sheet 2 n l num muy www@ Feb-20, 1940` v LOMBARDI 2,190,793

KNITTED FABRIC Filed April a, 1937 5 sheets-sheet s Patented Feb. 20, 1940 PATENT OFFICE KNITTED FABRIC Vincent Lombardi, Garden City, N. Y., assgnor to Lombardi Knitting Machine Co., Inc., New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Application April 8p, 1937, Serial No. 135,635 i 11 Claims.

This invention relates to knittedlfabric and particularly to design fabrics.

An object of the invention is the provision of knitted fabric of such character that unusual and distinctive design eects will be provided thereon.

A more specific object is to provide a knitted fabric of the jersey or a modified jersey type wherein additional strands of yarn are embodied in a novel manner whereby distinctive design effects may be obtained.

lOther objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will in part appear hereinafter.

The invention accordingly comprises an article of manufacture possessing the features, properties, and the' relation of elements which will be exemplified in the article hereinafter described and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference should be had to the following detailed description taken inv .connection with the accompanying drawings, in

which: y

Figure 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic rear view of one form of fabric exemplifying certain embodiments in the invention;

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic rear view of a form of fabric exemplifying other embodiments of the invention;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged somewhat diagrammatic detail View of the portion of the fabric of Fig. 2 set od by the dot-and-dash lines;

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a portion of the fabric of Fig. 2 taken in the direction of the arrows along the line 4--4 of Fis. 2; I

Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic rear view of another form of fabric exemplifying still other embodiments of the invention;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged somewhat diagrammatic detail view of the portion of the fabric of Fig. 5 set off by dot-and-dash lines;

Fig. 'I is a diagrammatic rear view of still another form of fabric exemplifying another embodiment of the invention; and

Fig. 8 is a somewhat diagrammatic front view of an additional form of fabric exemplifylng still other Aembodiments of the invention.

Jersey fabrics, and modified ie'rsey fabrics such, for instance, as exemplied in my Patents 1,541,- 230, 1,728,293, and 2,002,271 among others, are, because of their appearance, sturdiness, and easy production, excellently adapted for a wide variety of uses; andmodified jersey fabrics of (Cl. (i6-190) the types including a secondary yarn thruout the body thereof are, because of their heaviness and resistance to stretching, admirably adapted for use in coatings, and in other articles wherein Woven fabrics are often employed. However, in fabrics of the jersey character, which term is used herein to include fabrics of modified jersey types as well as plain jersey fabrics, the range of design effects obtainable has generally been limited to designs obtained by varying the portions of the fabric wherein a particular one of the yarn-groups making up the fabric is knitted. Design effects have also been obtained by inserting special yarns in particular courses or at particular portions of the fabric, but the types of designs which can be thus obtained are likewise limited;

With the foregoing an'd other considerations in view,.the present invention contemplates the provision of knitted fabric wherein a strand of yarn other than the yarn or yarns forming the body of the fabric runs across certain of the courses and wales of the fabric and is caught therein at desirably positioned spaced points so as to give a distinctive design effect, and especially the provision of a knitted fabric of the .jersey character comprising body yarn and a strand of additional yarn extending across certain of the courses and wales of the fabric and vcaught into the fabric at irregularly disposed spaced points. The term strand of yarn" is utilized herein to include a single thread of yarn; a plurality of threads of yarn utilized as a unit, asin a rope; a ribbon of yarn, etc.; and the term yarn is used in its generic sense in this art, and is not intended to imply the use of any particular material or procedure in its formation. Each strand or other or additional yarn may .be caught into the fabric so as to appear primarily at the rear of a fabric, or, in certain instances, may appear at least partly on the front of the fabric to provide design effects thereon. In referring to the rear of the fabric it is intended to designate that side thereof which is ordinarily considered the rear of a jersey or modified jersey fabric, but, it is to be understood, that such side may be utilized as the exposed portion of the fabric in a garment, or may be employed in suchtype, as in courses thru-58; or may be en- 7 vis caught into the fabric in such manner that the additional yarn lies between a portion of body yarn which is knitted and a portion of *body yarn which is itself at the rear of the fabric.

`In accordance with the broader aspects. of the invention, the strand or strands of additional yarn may be, caught into the fabric between loops thereof in adjacent rows at those points where it is desirable to catch the yarn, or may be extended under portions of reinforcing or other body yarn which extend course-wise of the knitted yarn, in which case its appearance on the front of the fabric may be substantially avoided; or it may be caught thru loops, or under suitably disposed portions of the looped yarn, or may be extended thru the fabric from front to rear andfrom rear to front, or be otherwise secured in certain instances; and, in accordance with certain of theraspects of the invention. may be caught into the fabric by' being formed into a knitted loop at the point where it is caught. Such strand or strands may extend in any of a wide variety of `manners across certain of the courses and certain of the wales, solas to provide any of a wide number of highly desirable and attractive design effects. In order to illustrate the invention, a few of the many ways in which such strand or strands may be caught into th`e fabric and extended thereacross are exemplied hereinafter. In accordance with the invention, particularly striking design eiects are obtained by extending the strand or strands of ady ditional yarn irregularly across the fabric. It will be appreciated, however, that in such cases the strand does not need to extend in a varying manner thruout its entire extent in a large piece of fabric, ,but that various irregular design formations may be repeated from time to time thruout the length or breadth of afabric.

In Fig. 1 there is exemplified a piece of fabric embodying the invention. In this fabric a yarn (which maybe white yarn) is knitted thruout the fabric. In courses 50 thru 58 of the fabric the body of the fabric is composed entirely of this yarn, whereas` in courses`59 thru 69 an additional body yarn 2 is included. The body yarn 2, as exemplified, extends course-wise of the fabric and isv caught at spaced points in each course under portions of the knitted yarn, being caught, in the present instance, between aloop in one rowv and a loop in an adjacent row in'alternate wales. The yarn 2, as exemplified, is yarn of a different character from the yarn (being red yarn, for instance),'but it will be understood that it may be yarn of the same character as the yarn (white yarn) The body of the fabric maybe entirely of the plain jersey A tirely of a modified jersey type, as in wales 59 thru 69; or may be of one or more of these or othermodied jersey types. As exemplied the yarn 2 is caught in even numbered wales inthe in courses 60, 62,. etc.

A strand of other yarn 3 (whichfmay be blue yarn) extends across the courses and wales of the fabric in an irregular manner to give 'a striking ,courses 59, 6|, etc., and in odd numbered wales design eiect, being caught into the fabric at spaced points. In the present instance, the yarn 3 appears on what is ordinarily considered the backof the fabric and is held between a loop in Onerow and a loop in an adjacent row at the points whereit is caught. As exemplified, the yarn 3 is caught inwales 20|, 203and`205 of course 50; 205 of course 52; 2t@ of course 54;

- fabric of the character exemplified in Fig. 5 of vide a group of the yarn 5 (one such group being indicated at A, in Fig. 3) in each of the lateral .'under the group in lateral row |24 and vertical variety of designs to be easily and effectively 20| of course 53; 20| of course 59; 204 of course B0; 20| of course 5|; 202 of course 62; 202 of course 33, wherein the yarn 2 is also caught; 20| of course 34, wherein the yarn 2 is also caught; 20| of. course 65; and 20| of course 61.' 5 A strand of another yarn 4 extends across the fabric in an irregular but different mannerto give a different design effect, being caught at differently spaced points. The yarn 4, like the yarn 3, appears on what is ordinarily the back 1 of the fabric and is held between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row at the points where it is caught. As exemplied, the yarn 4 is caught in Wale 2|5 of courses 50 and 53;*2I3 of course 54; 2|| of course 56; 2|| and 2|5 of 1 course 51; 209 of course 58; 2|2 and 218 of course 59; 2|6 of course 60; 2|6 of course 63; 2|2 of course 64; 2|1 of course 55; and 2|4 of course As will be appreciated, vstrands of still other 2L yarns may be provided in a larger piece of fabric and these may extend similarly to one or another of the yarns 3 and 4 or differently therefrom, as may be desired.

In Figs. 2, 3, and 4 there is shown a form of my Patent 2,002,271, dated May 2l, 1935. The body of this fabric comprises yarn 6 which is knitted thruout a plurality of wales in each of vertical rows 300, 302, etc., and yarn 1 which is knitted thruout a plurality of wales in each of vertical rows 30|, 303, etc.. A plurality of the strands of the yarn 6 are carried across the rear of the, fabric where the yarn 1 is knitted to prorows |0|, |03, etc., and avplurality of'strands of the yarn 1 are carried across the rearof the fabric where the yarn 6- is knitted to provide a group (one such group being indicated at B in. Fig. 3) in each of the lateral rows |00, |02, etc.

In accordance with the invention there is provided in this fabric a strand of yarn 5, which, in the present instance, is in the form of a ribbon. This yarn extends under the group of loose yarns of the lateral row |0| and the vertical row 30| thence successively under the groups in lateral rows |03 and |05 of vertical row 30|; thence diagonally across the wales and courses of the fabric under the group of yarns in lateral row |08 and vertical row 302, and in lateral row |||I and vertical row l303; thence it extends vertically under the group in lateral row ||3 in vertical row 303;` thence diagonally to the left to the group of yarns in lateral row ||6 and vertical row 302, and under this group and the' group in lateral row ||3 in the same vertical row; thence it extends diagonally tothe right to and under the group of yarns in lateral row |2| and vertical row 303; thence diagonallyto the left to and row 302; and thence diagonally tothe right to andunder the group in--lateral row |21 and vertical 'row 303. It will be appreciated thatthis manner of catching ayarn in permits a wide formed. The yarn so caught in the fabric may extend in any of various dii'erent manners. It may also, if desired, continue downwardly, as at the upper left-hand part of Fig. 2, under the loops in a single vertical row, in certain instances.

'I'he fabric also embodies a strand of yarn I0 (which may be red yarn)A which extends do wardly from an' upper portion oi the fabricvgt shown, and thence upwardly under the group of yarns in lateral row |00 and vertical row 308; thence downwardly over the group at the juncture of rows |02 and 308, and upwardly under this group. It extends in a similar manner over and under the groups at the junctures of rows |04 and 308, and of |06 and 308; thence it extends diagonally to a point below the group at the juncture of rows |01 and 301 and upwardly under this group; thence to 'a point below the group at the juncture of rows |08 and 306 and upwardly under this group, Where it completes its diagonal course; thence downwardly under the group at the juncture of rows |09 and 305, and thence diagonally in the other direction to points successively below the groups at the junctures of rows ||0 and 306, of rows |I| and 301, and of rows ||2 and 308, extending upwardly under each of these groups; thence it extends downwardly over the latter group and the group at the juncture of rows ||4 and 308 and upwardly under this group; and thence it extends diagonally in the first direction, being caught under the groups at the junctures of 4 and 308, of ||5 and 301, and of IIB and 306, in a manner similar to the manner in which it was caught at its first diagonal course; thence it extends downwardly and then is caught in the fabric by being extended thru the fabric to the front thereof at Ia. It is thereupon carried on the front of the fabric, as indicated at E (Fig. 4),' being then extended at IIlb back thru the fabric, and extending diagonally across the back of the fabric, passing over the group at the juncture of rows I9 and 305, as indicated at F. At the end of the portion F it again extends to the front of the fabric, as indicated at |0c; thence it extends downwardly at the front of the fabric, as indicated at G, passes at |0d to the back of the fabric, extends diagonally to the right at the rear of the fabric as indicated at H, extending over the loop of yarns at lateral row |23 and vertical row 305, passes thru the fabric at |0e, extends on the front ofthe fabric at I, extends to the back of the fabric at |0f, and extends on the back of the fabric to a part thereof beneath the part illustrated.

In Figs. 5 and 6-the body of the fabric is of a character, the form of which will be readily understood by reference to my Patent 2,002,271, dated May 21, 1935. In the present instance, the fabric comprises body yarn II which is knitted throughout groups of wales in vertical rows 403, etc., and of additional body yarn I2 which is knitted in groups of Wales forming vertical rows 400, 402, etc. Between each of the vertical rows the yarns and |2 are each knitted in a single Wale, a plurality4 (four, in the present instance) of the strands of the yarn being knitted, as at IIa, IIb, IIc, and Hd, and thereupon a plurality (four, in the present instance) of the strands of the4 yarn I2 being knitted in the same wale, as at |2a, |21), |2c, and Halthis type of alternation continuing throughout the Wale. Wales of this character are shown at 4|0, 4||, 4|2, etc. The yarn extends across the back of the fabric in the vertical rows wherein the yarn I2 is knitted, and the yarn I2 extends at the rear of the fabric across the vertical rows wherein the yarn is knitted-the plurality of yarns which form adjacent loops in the wales 4|0, 4| I, etc., extending across the rear of the fabric as a group. The manner of such grouping is well exemplified at J in Fig. 6, wherein the four strands of the yarn I2, which extend from the loops |2a, |2b, |2c, and

|2d in the Wale 4| 0 to similarly numbered loops in the Wale 4| I, constitute the group. Each group of such strands is, in the present instance, caught or tied in between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row at a more or less central point as indicated'at K. The yarns and I2' may be of the same or different characters, as desired. In the present instance, they may be considered as both consisting of relatively light-Weight white yarn. As will be seen, the groups of the yarn are arranged in lateral rows |30, |32, etc., and the groups of the yarn I2 are arranged in lateral rows |3I, |33, etc.

At the left hand side of Fig. 5 there is exemplified a strand of yarn I3 (which may be heavy blue yarn), which is embodied in the fabric to give design effects.l wardly under the right hand side of the group at the juncture of rows |30 and 400; under the left hand side of the group at the juncture of rows |3| and 40|; upwardly under the right hand side of this group; downwardly unde` the left hand side of the group in lateral row |32 and vertical row 402; thence to the left; and then downwardly under the left hand side of the group at the juncture of rows |33 and 403,v the right hand side of the group at the juncture of '|34 and 402, the' left hand side of the group at the juncture of rows |35 and 403, and the right hand side of the group at the juncture of rows |36 and 402; thence upwardly under the right hand side of the latter group, and similarly under the sides of the group in lateral roW |31 and vertical row 40|; and thence successively .under the right and left hand sides of the groups at the junctures of rows |30 anud 400, |33 and 40|, |4| and '400, and |42 .and 40 l A second additional yarn I4, which .as exemplified consists of two threads of yarn-as, for instance, gold yarn and silver yarn wound together to form a rope-extendsalong the rear of thefabric, being caught under the left hand side of the loops in lateral rows I 30, |32, |34, and

|36 of vertical row 404'; thence extends under the right hand sides of the loops in lateral row |31 and vertical row 403, and in lateral row |38 and vertical row 402; thence under the right hand sides of the groups in lateral rows |39 and I4| and vertical row 40|; and thence under the right hand side of the group in lateral row |42 and verticalrow 402.

As will be observed from Fig. 6, each Wale, such as 4|0, 4||, etc., wherein all of the body yarns are knitted, extends in a somewhat wavy line, so that the knitted loops of the yarn are nearest the vertical rows wherein the yarn is knitted, as at L, leaving a gap at the left; and the loops wherein the yarn I2 is knitted in the Wale are nearest the vertical row wherein the yarn I2 is knitted, as at M, leaving a gap at the right. Accordingly, there Will be a space at the front of the fabric under the edges of the groups of yarn, so that an additional yarn running under the groups of yarn at these points will appear at the front of the fabric thru the gaps, so as to give a design effect in the front, in association with a Wale as 4 |0 or 4| I, at such a point. Portions of yarn of this character are particularly exemplified at |3a, |3c, |3e, |3g, and |312, land at |4e and |4,, where the strand of yarn is at the left hand side of the Wale; and also atI3b, |3d, |3f, |3h, Ida, |4b, |40, and |411, where the strand of yarn is at the right hand side of the Wale.

An additional yarn I5 (which may be black yarn) is caught into the fabric; extending under ,King entirely 452, etc., of courses |5I and |53, etc.A

the vright hand side of the grup in lateral row |30 and vertical row 408, and under the right hand side of those -groups in Fig. 5 which are similarly disposed with respect to each other as are the groups of the fabric of Fig. 2 under which the yarn I extends in courses |02 through ||2 of Fig. 2 except at the point `where the yarn extends furthest to the left, where in the present instance itis extended downwardly under the left hand side of the groups in lateral rows |138 and. |40 and vertical row 406, instead of being car-` ried under the right hand side of the group in lateral row |39 and vertical row 405 where it would tend to show on the front of the fabricthe positioning of all these groups in Fig. 5 being readily apparent from Fig. 5. It is to be noted that this yarn extends entirely to the rear of the fabric, and it is contemplated that it will be so.

disposed thruout the entire fabric. The right hand side of the fabric of Fig. 5 may, in this connection, be considered as an individual piece of fabric. In'a fabric of this type, the black yarn affects the appearance ofthe front of the fabric very slightly, and enables the fabric to be used in instances where the absence, rather than the presence, of special design effects on the front of the fabric is desirable.

In Fig. 7 thereis s hown a form of fabric the body of which is similar to that shown in the lower portion of Fig. 1. This fabric comprises yarn I6 (which maybe heavy white yarn) and which is tightly knitted in the jersey fashion; and also yarn I1 (which may also be heavy white yarn) and which is arranged similarly to the yarn 2 in Fig. l, being caught, in the present instance, between a loop in one row and a loop in1 an adjacent row in alternate wales in alternate courses. It is to be noted in this connection that in fabrics such as shown in this figure and at the bottom of Fig. 1, while the yarn which is caught between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row is referred to as being caught in a given course and in a given wale, it is actually extended between the loops of tworcourses and may extend more or less above the course referred to, and may also be caught at points variously spaced laterally, as for instance being caught in proximity to the points where the loops cross each other or being extended at other points under (as viewed from the rear) a portion of the looped yarn in one row and over a portion of the looped yarn in a lower rowin some instances extending under the lowerrnost part of the yarn whichp-is looped in the upper row. It is accordingly to be understood that the ,references to courses" and to wales herein are to'be taken'in a general sense and are to be understood to include areas which may to some extent overlap. In the present instance, the yarn I1 in the courses |50, |52, etc., is caught in the wales-450', 452,' etc., and the yarn I1 in the courses I5I, |53, etc., is caught in the wales 45|, 453, etc. In the courses |50, |52, etc., the yarn I1 extends entirely behind the fabric in wales` 45|, 453, etc., to form portions |1e. Similarly the yarn I1 forms portions |1e extendbehind the fabric in the wales 450, While in vthe diagrammatic showing of Fig. '1 the lines indicating the yarn have, for the sake of clarity of illustration, been made relatively thin and have been spaced well apart,` from each other, it is `to be understood that-.diane yarn I6 is suiilciently ytightly knitted and sumc'iently thickiso that those. Ag portions of other yarn which are disposed on the rear of the knitted yann-will notordinariiy be visible from the front of the fabric. In the present instance, strands of additional yarn extending on the back of the fabric are caught therein by being extended under the portion |1e at suitable points. As exemplified, a yarn I8 (which may course |59, walef453 of course |62, wale 455 of course |64, and wale 455 of course |68. As will be apparent, this manner of catching in an additional yarn permits thev provision of a fabric wherein the additional yarn itself never extends to thefront of the fabric and where its appearance on the front of the fabric is consequently eliminated when the body of the fabric is formed of relatively tightly knitted, relatively thick yarn, as exemplified. As will be appreciated, the yarn should for this purpose be knitted more tightly if it is particularly thin or\ should be thicker if it is relatively loosely knit. It is to be understood that in this instance, as in others, the body yarn which is not knitted at any lparticular part of the fabric may be caught into the fabric at spaced points in various ways; as by being caught between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row in wales which are spaced by two, three, or even more wales; by being knitted in the fabric; by being extended thru loops; by being caught under a. portion of the knitted yarn, as under a portion in a wale or between two walessuch portions being spaced one or more wales apart, as desired; or by being caught into the fabric at the edge of said p art of the fabric where said part is not wide; or by other dispositions which will be apparent to those skilled in the art. It is also to be understood that in this instance, as in others-as, for example, -in Fig. l-certain `of the body yarns may be knitted at certain parts by a portion of whatever yarn extends at the rear of the fabric at a given point.

Inv Fig. '8 there is shown a form of fabric wherein a body yarn 20 (which may be blue yarn) is knitted thruout the fabric, except that occasionally, as hereinafter pointed out, a loop of an additional yarn is knitted in place of a loop of the yarn 20. A second' body yarn 2| extends coursefwise and is caught into the fabric at spaced wales (alternate wales in the present instan e) between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row to provide a modified jersey fabric. As exemplified, the yarn'2I (which may be `white yarn) is caught between the loops in wales 503etc., and is carried entirely at ,the rear `of the fabric at wales 500,502, etc. A strand of yarn 22 extends at the rear of the fabric diagonally upwardly and `to the right from this loop to a point wherein it is caught in the fabricat a point above-the showing of the figure; and extends at the rear of the fabric diagonally, downwardly to the right to a point 22D whereit is formed into a loopv in place of a loop of theyarn 20 in waie 503 of course |15; thence at the rear of the fabric again downwardly to the right to a point 22e where it forms a loop in place of a loop of the yarn 20 in wale 505 of course ITI; thence at the rear of the fabric downwardlytov the left to form a. loop 22d in place of the loop of the yarn 20 in Wale 502 of course |82; and thence at the rear of the fabric downwardly to the right to a further point (not shown) where it is caught into the fabric.

Another additional yarn 23 (which may also be heavy red yarn, although it may be yarn of still another character, if desired) extends at the front of the fabric downwardly from an upper point (not shown), wherein it is caught into the fabric, to a point 23a wherein it forms a loop replacing the loop of the body yarn 20 in wale 501 of course H2; thence at the rear of the fabric laterally and somewhat downwardly, inthe present instance, to a point 23h wherein it forms a loop in wale 5II of course |14; thence at the front of the fabric downwardly to a point 23cwhere it forms a loop in Wale 5H of course |80; thence laterally and somewhat downwardly at the rear of the fabric, in the present instance, to a point 23d where it forms a loop in Wale 508` of course 183; and thence downwardly at the front of the fabric to a lower point (not shown) where it is again caught into the fabric. As will be seen, arrangements such as those provided by the additional yarns `22 and 23 provide unusual and `distinctive design effects on .the front of the fabric, as well as being caught into the fabric in a different manner from the additional yarns in the preceding exemplifications.

As will be understood, yarn of characters which contrast in other ways than `in color, such, for instance, as wool yarn :and rayon yarn, thin yarn and thick yarn, etc., may be utilized instead of yarn of different colors so as togive design effects in accordance with the invention. As will be apparent, fabrics having distinctive and highly attractive design effects which depart markedly from the usual type of designing may be provided in accordance with the present invention.

Since certain changes may be made in the above product and different embodimentsof the invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described, and all statements of the scope of' the invention which as a matter of language kmight be said to fall therebetween.

Reference is made to my copendingapplications Serial No. 280,705, filed `June 23, 1939, and Serial No. 280,706, filed June `23, 1939, containing claims directed to subject matter divided out in the present case. Y

I claim:

l. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body `yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing, yarn; said additional yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various ofthe courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught.

2. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is 5 knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing, yarn; said additional yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught into the fabric at spaced positions without knitting, and being floated over a plurality of courses at certain parts of said portion and over a plurality of wales at other parts of said portion. 15

3. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing, yarn; said additional yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and Wales` of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion Without being knitted and without crossing itself, and being floated across' one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught.

i. Knitted fabric ofthe jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing, yarn; said additif-aal yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion `or' its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular `but substantially linear manner 35 across various of the courses and Wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught.

5. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted and additional, ornamental-effect producing, yarn; said additional yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being oated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught, said additional yarn being caught into the fabric at pointsin said portion between the two sides 0f a loop in one row and the two sides of a loop in an adjacent row.

6. Knitted fabric of the. jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-'effect producing, yarn; said additional yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in cer- ,65

' knitted; and a plurality of strands of additional,

ornamental-effect producing, yarn; each of said strands of additional yarn, thruout at least a 'lo substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions Where it is so caught; one of said strands extending across said fabric in a different manner from the manner in which another of said strands extends across said fabric.

8. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing,yarn; said additional yarn,thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, andin an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions Where it is so caught, said additional yarn being of a different character than said body yarn.

9. Knitted fabric of the jersey character comprising body yarn at least certain of which is knitted; and additional, ornamental-effect producing,yarn; said additional yarn, thruout atleast a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the fabric, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and .wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain.

ornamental-eiect-producing yarn,

prising body yarn at least certain of which is 4 knitted; and a strand of heavier, ornamentaleffect-producing yarn; said heavier yarn, thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, ex-

tending generally at the rear of the fabric, and

in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught.

11. Knitted fabric of a modified jersey character comprising body yarn atleast certain of which is knittedand at least certain of which is caught into the fabric without knitting; and additional said additional yarn thruout at least a substantial portion of its extent, extending generally at the rear of the knitted yarn, and in an irregular manner across various of the courses and wales of the fabric, and being caught in certain wales and courses of the fabric thruout said portion without being knitted, and being floated across one or more wales or courses between at least the majority of positions where it is so caught.

' VINCENT LOMBARDI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5623839 *Apr 5, 1995Apr 29, 1997Sara Lee CorporationHosiery garment
US6159239 *Aug 14, 1998Dec 12, 2000Prodesco, Inc.Woven stent/graft structure
US6164339 *Nov 10, 1999Dec 26, 2000Prodesco, Inc.Method of forming a woven textile
US6192944Apr 24, 2000Feb 27, 2001Prodesco, Inc.Method of forming a textile member with undulating wire
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/190
International ClassificationD04B1/10
Cooperative ClassificationD04B1/10
European ClassificationD04B1/10