Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2193805 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 19, 1940
Filing dateOct 9, 1937
Priority dateOct 9, 1937
Publication numberUS 2193805 A, US 2193805A, US-A-2193805, US2193805 A, US2193805A
InventorsDeschner Richard E
Original AssigneeDeschner Richard E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pouring sleeve and cap
US 2193805 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'R. E. DESCHNER 2,193,805 POURING SLEEVE AND. CAP

March 19, 1940.

Filed dot. 9; 19:57

176. /6 [76. /7 f .5 WA 66 v INVENTOR. /9 i flown 152043464447? 1 ATTORNEY.

Patented Mar. 19, 1940 1 UNITED STATES POURING SLEEVE AND CAP Richard E. Deschner, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application October 9,

13 Claims.

This invention'relates to an improvedpouring sleeve and cap for bottles and other similar containers, and also to an improved means for preventing drippage down the side of the container either before, during or after the pouring operation.

One of the objects of the invention is to provide a drippage preventing means which is capable of being mounted. within a bottle neck in a normally retracted position therein, from which position it may be extruded to a projecting position in relation to the mouth of the bottle and then utilized as a drippage-preventing pouring spout, and after being so used it may. be covered by a cap so constructed as to provide a housing for it which will permit it to remain in the extruded position.

Another object of the invention is toprovide an improved pouring sleeve which is of a radially expansible character and is therefore capable of adapting itself to bottle necks differing considerably in diameter.

Another object relates to providing a cap and pouring sleeve structure particularly well adapted to be used in combination with efiicient bottle sealing means.

Still another object of the invention is to provide for bottles and like containers a pouring lip which will, notwithstanding its efficiency for pouring liquids without drippage, be so constructed as to safeguard against cutting the fingers of the user.

Yet other objects relate to improvement in regard to general simplification of structure and lowered cost of manufacture.

Other objects, advantages and features of invention may hereinafter appear. I I v 1 Referring to the accompanying drawing, which illustrates what are at present deemed to be preferred embodiments of the invention.

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the pouring sleeve in an operative position, a fragment of the neck portion of a bottle being shown in combination therewith.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of'the sleeve of Fig. 1 separately shown.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of a modified form of the sleeve. Figs. 1 to 3 show preferred embodiments of the sleeve provided by the invention.

Fig, 4 is a plan view of the sleeve shown in Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a section on line 55 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged section on line 66 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction indicated by the arrows.

Fig. '7 is a plan view of the sleeve shown in 1937, Serial No. 168,245

Fig. 2, said sleeve being shown in its expanded condition. 1

Fig. 8 shows another modification of the sleeve, which in this view is shown in its retracted or inoperative position in relation to the neck portion of a bottle.

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the structure'shown in Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is a side elevation of the sleeve in the final stage of its withdrawal from the neck of a bottle. r

Fig. 11 isa vertical mid-section of a further modification of the structure shown in Figs. 3 and 5.

Fig. 12 shows, in side elevation,- still another modification of the pouring sleeve.

Fig. 13 is a plan view of the sleeve shown in Fig. 12.

Fig, 14 is a plan in Fig. 15.

Fig. 15 is a mid-sectional view of the sleeve shown in Fig. 3 as sealed in the bottle neck by the manufacturer.

Fig. 16 illustrates the method of extending the pouring sleeve from the retracted to the operative position.

View of the structure shown Fig. 17 illustrates the device with the cap in its applied position as it appears between pouring operations after the bottle has been unsealed,

Fig. 18 is a vertical mid-section of a further modification showing the sleeve housed within the cap and in the extended position.

Figs. ,19 and 20 are sectional views of edge portions of pouring lips in the pouring position to illustrate how lip formation or contour affects the tendency of the poured liquid to flow back under such lips. M

Fig. 21 is a vertical mid-section of. a tin cap with the sleeve afixed in a position for pouring.

Fig. 22 shows the same sleeve as Fig. 21, except that the sleeve is in its retracted position. Part of this view is in mid-section and part in side elevation. The metallic structures surrounding the sleeve difier from those shown in Fig. 21.

Referring in detailto the drawing, the sleeve l0 shown in Figs. 1 and 2 may be inserted in the neck H of a bottle or other container before or after said container is filled by the manufacturer of the contents thereof. Then said container may be sealed by any of the ordinary present day cap sealing methods.

Said sleeve I0 is of a bendable, resilient character, and may be made of thin sheet metal, waxed paper or from sheets of some such substance 'as the cellulose acetate known by the trade name Lumarith, or of any other thin sheet material which may be found suitable. Said sleeve is composed of a single circularly curved sheet which has contacting end portions which overlap at l2, thus enabling it to fit closely within bottle necks difiering considerably in diameter.

The sleeve it is a drip preventer and finds its use every time liquid is poured from the container. The sharp upper edge of the sleeve is an efiective means for cutting off the stream of liquid as the container is righted after pouring. This cutting off of the stream prevents drippage and. subsequent running down of the liquid outside the container.

If the sleeve is made of an unwaxed sheet material, a wax coating i lmay be applied to the outer end portion thereof.

A coat of wax applied this way keeps the upper part of the sleeve always dry and clean looking. The wax also helps some in cutting off the pouring stream. These qualities of the wax coated sleeve are due to the low molecular attraction between wax and aqueous liquids.

The sleeve of Figs. 1 and 2 is shown compressed, that is, it is held by the bottle neck in this position. Actually the sleeve would, if let free, expand to a larger diameter as in Fig. '7.

The sleeve 55 shown in Figs. 3, 4 and 5 is different from that shown in Fig. 1 in that it has two raised annular beads or bumps l6 and ll and an outwardly directed flange or lip l 8. Said lip serves as an aid to the sharp edge in keeping the top of the sleeve clean. This feature is shown by Figs. 19 and 20. The liquid has more of a tendency to run under at E9 than it does at 18 because i8 is uphill. But the lip it serves an additional purpose. As shown in Fig. 15, it prevents the sleeve irom falling into the container even tho the container might be shaken or jarred severely during shipment.

The beads i6 and ii serve two purposes also. As shown in Fig, 5, they prevent lips l8 and 20 from getting cut of alignment vertically. As seen in Fig. 16 the bead l8 serves to locate the sleeve in its properly extended condition while the bead ll serves the purpose of acting as a spacer. In the glass bottle necks shown in Figs. 15, 16 and 17, each neck has a larger bore below the mouth than it does at the mouth, therefore bead Ii acts to center the sleeve and prevent it from expanding at the base and assuming a truncated cone shape.

The lap joint shown at E2 in Figs. 1 to 5, and 8 to 10 inclusive gives a flexible joint which allows expansion or contraction of the sleeve but yet presents an unbroken pouring spout to the liquid. The double thickness of the pouring lip at the joint affects the cutting off the stream but very little since the material in the sleeve is very thin.

In Fig. 7 the sleeve 10 of Figs. 1 and 2 is shown in the expanded condition it will assume, owing to its resiliency, when completely withdrawn from the bottle neck and not restrained from springing out to the fullest extent when there will be a gap lea between its straight edges. It is to be understood that the various other sleeves when made of resilient sheet material will expand likewise, but the expansion will be less in those which have circumferential ribs.

The type of sleeve shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10 has two features not shown by the sleeve of Figs. 1 and 2, namely the convex projections 23 which act to locate the sleeve in the container and the weld 24.

These projections may be used (instead of the beads of Fig. 3) to give a sleeve greater flexibility. The beads l6 and H tend to stiffen the sleeve the same as the corrugations in sheet iron used for buildings. The weld 24 is made after the sleeve has been inserted in the container neck 25 as in Fig. 8. The weld in Lumarith is accomplished by thrusting a hot wire through the lap joint at the base of the sleeve. The weld has its purpose in keeping the edges of the inserted sleeve parallei and also in keeping the base of the sleeve from expanding when the sleeve is withdrawn from the bottle as in Fig. 10, but yet the top of the sleeve can expand to always keep the sleeve tight in the bottle neck.

The sleeve 31} of Fig. 11 has a flaring pouring flange 3! which provides a sharper pouring edge than the sleeves of Figs. 3 and 6. Furthermore this sleeve has two special characteristics; the lip or flange 3! is very wide (for use in handling heavy liquids such as ketchup this is necessary), while the groove at 32 allows the lip to be wider than in Fig. 3 without the lip being any larger in outside diameter than the one in said view. The second special characteristic of sleeve 30 is its inwardly directed bottom edge or lip 33 for the purpose of providing a better hold for the raising hook described later. Said lip 33 also permits easier and quicker insertion of the sleeve within the mouth portion of the container. This sleeve, like those shown in Figs. 3 and has spaced circumferential ribs i5 and H.

In Figs. 12 and 13 there is no lap joint in the sleeve This particular sleeve could be made for example from waxed paper having corrugations 35 as shown. The corrugations give the desired flexibility. This flexibility has the double function of holding the sleeve in different positions as in the bottle neck 40 of Figs. 15 and 16, and of permitting the sleeve to adjust itself to bottle necks varying a great deal in size.

Owing to the thin, resilient material of which they are made, the pouring sleeves shown in Figs. 3, 8, 9, 10 and 11, notwithstanding their exterior projections and the fact that the sleeve of Figs. 8 to 10 has a weld therein, can all be moved lengthwise within bottle necks as required, their Walls springing inwardly, as required, adjacent to their various external projections.

The corrugations 36 of the sleeve 35 shown in Figs. 12 and 13 become virtually obliterated under the pressure of the bottle neck so that leakage does not occur through them.

The bottle neck 45 of Figs. 15, 16 and 17 is a plain neck type while in Figs. 8 and 10 it is of a threaded type. This causes a difference in internal contour. The dress cap M of Fig. 15 has little dents 42 which bind on the bulge .3 of the bottle as shown. The dress cap for Figs. 8 and 10, if shown, would have screw threads.

A regular crown cap (beer bottle cap) could be substituted for the seal which consists of the inner cap it, the gasket 45 and the soft metal ring Mr shown in Fig. 15. Both these types of caps are used on ketchup bottles. The cap M has a contracted top portiton 41c and an annular shoulder dis which engages the ring 411'.

In Fig. 16 is shown a tool 59 for lifting the sleeve 15a. (Said sleeve is like the -evc $5 of Fig, 3 except that it has the sharp pouring edge shown in Fig. 11.) This tool 50 has a handle 5i and a hook for applying tractive force to the lower end of the inserted sleeve. The annular external rib ll, spaced above the lower end of the sleeve, insures a clearance of the point of the hook 52.

The annular ring I6 (Fig. 16) will oppose pushing the sleeve into the container. But the various types of sleeves shown may be pushed into the container if sufficient downward pressure is applied to them. This gives them an advantageous safety feature. Being sharp on their upper edges they might (if inflexible) cut the users hand if he were to strike it against them accidentally. But, as it is, said sleeves will not injure anyone because of their flexibility and of their sliding downwardly before pressing enough to cut.

Fig. 17 illustrates another advantage of the sleeve and cap combination shown in Fig. 15. The cap being recessed at the top, as shown,

the user needs to pull the sleeve out to pouring position but once, and thereafter he may apply the cap with the sleeve remaining always in pouring position until the container is discarded.

Fig, 18 shows a special type of screw cap 55 which allows the sleeve 56 to be inserted in the bottle 51 in its pouring position by the manufacturer. With this type two gaskets 58 and 59 are used. The gasket 59 really seals the contents, while the gasket 58 is only needed to keep contents from getting between the cap and the outside of the sleeve. Without the latter gasket the contents would spill down the sides of the bottle the first time the capwas removed, but gasket 58 is not absolutely necessary. The cap 55 is furnished with a contracted top portion 550 surrounded by the shoulder 55s.

The advantage secured by providing the lip IS on the sleeve portions 8 of Fig. 20, over omitting said lip as indicated in Fig. 19, has already been mentioned. In these two views the bottle neck is assumed to be in substantially a horizontal position and the sectioning longitudinally through the lower side of the pouring sleeve.

Fig. 21 shows a tin can 69 equipped with a sleeve 6i. Altho the dress cap 62 is not recessed in this case, clearance is provided for the sleeve in its pouring position. This type of container would be sold with the sleeve in the pouring position.

Fig. 22 shows a tin can 55 with sleeve 65 which must be pulled up for use. The advantage of this type over that shown in Fig. 21 is the use of a shallower dress cap and seal cap. When the sleeve is pulled up, the bead changes from groove 11 to groove x.

The various pouring sleeves shown are also for use with cooking oils, hair oils, etc. These oily liquids have a greater molecular attraction for other objects than water base liquids such as ketchup and syrup. Therefore a stream of oil issuing from the sleeve is not completely out off when the container is righted. A small drop of oil nearly always remains on the outside of the sleeve after pouring and it runs downward after the container is set down in a vertical standing position.

Another important characteristic of the sleeve provided by this invention comes into play as follows: Neither the sleeve, nor the cylindrical neck in which it rests, is perfectly round. The irregularities present make small, almost unno-ticeable clearance spaces between the outside of the sleeve and the container neck as at ill in Figs. 16 and 21. Any oil running down the outside of the sleeve passes between the pouring sleeve and container neck at a point indicated Min Figs. 16 and 21. In fact it is drawn past this point space by capillary attraction. When this space at becomes filled with liquid, other liquid may enter the crack from above and the liquid in the crack will seep down into the co-ntainer by gravity.

The dress cap of Fig. 21 has a sliding fit around its base. The dress cap of Fig. 22 has a rather loose fit after the seal cap is removed but that is the way Log Cabin syrup is put up now. However, Log Cabin syrup cans do not have a neck with grooves .r and y, nor a recess 16 in the dress cap.

The sleeve of Figs. l5, l6 and 17 does not closely resemble any other sleeves shown. It has the beads of Fig. 3 and the sharp lip of Fig. 11.

It should be understood that the present disclosure is for the purpose of illustration only and that this invention includes all modifications and equivalents which fall within the scope of 0 sheet of resilient material convexed into an overlapped tubular form and expansible, throughout its entire length into a close fit within bottle necks of different diameters, and means to maintain the tubular formation of said sleeve during the expanding thereof.

2. As an article of manufacture, a pouring sleeve for bottles and the like consisting of a sheet of resilient material convexed into a tubular form having overlapping edges and adapted to expand into a close fit within different sized bottle necks, said sleeve having circumferential ribs extending therearound consisting of outpressed wall portions thereof adapted to be brought into registry where they overlap.

3. The combination, with a bottle neck having a contracted portion; of a resilient, 'expansible,

pouring sleeve fittable within said bottle neck, said sleeve consisting of a sheet of resilient material convexed into a tubular form and having exterior projections spaced apart longitudinally thereof and adapted to cooperate with the contracted portion of said bottle neck to spaceapart therefrom the walls of the sleeve therewithin in extruded and retracted positions.

4. The subject matter of claim 3 and, the projections of said sleeve consisting of ribs extending exteriorly therearound registrable in their overlapped positions.

5. As an article of manufacture, a pouring sleeve for bottles and the like consisting of a sheet of resilient sheet material convexed into an approximately cylindrical form having overlapping edge portions extending throughout its entire length, said sleeve having a weld which prevents expansion of the overlapped edges at an end portion thereof, said sleeve having also external convex projections spacing the walls of the sleeve apart from the wall of the bottle.

6. The combination, with a bottles neck; of a sleeve insertable in said neck, means to seal said sleeve when it is in a retracted position in said bottles neck, and a dress cap covering the mouth of said bottle neck, said cap having a contracted crown portion; said contracted crown resting on said sealing means, incident to use, said sealing means being removable, and said sleeve being withdrawable to a permanent pouring position, the extended portion of said sleeve while in the permanent pouring position being housed in said crown portion.

7. A pouring sleeve for bottles and the like comprising a sheet of resilient material convexed into a tubular form, said tube having overlapping edges and adapted to expand into a frictional fit within bottle necks of different diameters, and means spacing a portion of the outer walls of the sleeve inwardly of the inner wall of the neck whereby overflow drippage after a pouring operation is facilitated in its movement back into the bottle.

8. The combination with a bottle neck; of a sleeve insertable in said neck, means to seal said bottle together with its said sleeve when the latter is in a fully inserted position, and a dress cap covering the mouth of said bottle neck, said cap having a crown portion, said seal being removable, and said sleeve bing withdrawable to a permanent pouring position, the extended portion of said sleeve while in the permanent pouring position being housed in said crown portion.

9. The subject matter of claim 8 and, said sleeve comprising a strip of flexible material curved into an approximately cylindrical shape with its two end portions overlapping, said overlapping end portions being provided with interlocking means holding said overlapping end portions from sliding in the direction of the length of the sleeve while permitting them to slide circumferentially of the sleeve.

10. In combination, a bottle neck, a tubular sleeve having overlapping edges slidably mounted within said neck, the overlapping edge portions being provided with interlocking projections or depressions which serve to hold said overlapping edge portions from sliding in the direction of the length of the sleeve while allowing them to slide circumferentially of the sleeve.

11. In combination, a bottle neck, a tubular sleeve having overlapping edges mounted within said neck, and means spacing a portion of the outer walls of the sleeve inwardly of the inner wall of the neck in the sleeves fully inserted position, said sleeve being expandible to bring 1e outer wall of the sleeve into more intimate relation with the inner wall of the neck in the sleeves extended position, said means when in 1e latter position overlying an edge portion of the mouth of said neck and restricting the sleeves retraction.

12. As an article of manufacture, a pouring sleeve for bottles and the like, consisting of a sheet of resilient material convexed into an overlapped tubular form and expandible throughout its length into a close fit within bottle necks of different diameters, said sleeve having exterior projections consisting of outpressed wall portions thereof, spacing a portion of the outer walls of the sleeve inwardly of the inner wall of the neck at diiierent distances therefrom in the various fixed positions of the sleeve therewithin.

13. As an article of manufacture, a pouring sleeve for bottles and the like, consisting of a sheet of resilient material convexed into a tubular form having overlapping edges and adapted to expand into a close fit within different sized bottle necks, said sleeve having outpressed wall portions adapted to be brought into registry where they overlap.

RICHARD E. DESCHNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2848145 *Mar 17, 1955Aug 19, 1958Jay G LivingstonePouring adapter
US5651481 *Apr 5, 1995Jul 29, 1997Jensen; Brian VangDrip-catcher
US5979718 *Feb 6, 1998Nov 9, 1999Jinathan; LevineDevice for spillage prevention during pouring wine and the like
US6926169 *Jul 26, 2004Aug 9, 2005Piero Claudio BuratoDevice for the insertion of an anti-drip element into the mouth of a bottle
US9227760 *Aug 31, 2012Jan 5, 2016Antonio PieriboniDrip stop device
US20050023308 *Jul 26, 2004Feb 3, 2005Piero Claudio BuratoDevice for the insertion of an anti-drip element into the mouth of a bottle
USRE38859 *Feb 25, 1998Nov 1, 2005Brian Vang JensenDrip-catcher
DE1001141B *Sep 20, 1952Jan 17, 1957Friedrich BoysenAusgussstutzen an Behaeltern, insbesondere Benzinkanistern
WO2012175571A1 *Jun 20, 2012Dec 27, 2012Goetschi RudolfDrip cutter
WO2015067740A1Nov 7, 2014May 14, 2015Rudolf GötschiDrip stopper and system for preventing drips
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/562, 222/566
International ClassificationB65D47/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2251/0015, B65D2251/0078, B65D53/04, B65D41/16, B65D23/065, B65D45/32, B65D41/0442, B65D51/18
European ClassificationB65D41/16, B65D45/32, B65D53/04, B65D41/04D1, B65D23/06B, B65D51/18