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Publication numberUS2194537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1940
Filing dateApr 3, 1939
Priority dateApr 3, 1939
Publication numberUS 2194537 A, US 2194537A, US-A-2194537, US2194537 A, US2194537A
InventorsAdams Harry D
Original AssigneeAdams Harry D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy
US 2194537 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Mmh 26, 1940. H, D, ADAMS TpY Filed April 5, 1939 Q, a# ATTORNEY hm. l v PLII:

y mechanism within the head.

Patented Mar. I2e, 1940 siDATE:1\1Tlv OFFICE] TOY l Harry D. Adams, Brookline, Mass.

' .dipp iicatnmv April s, 1939, serial No. 265,619

Claims.

The invention relates .to an improvement in toys, imitative of snakes, or other objects having sinuosity of movement,

The essential object of the invention is to provide a construction by which a sinuous move,- rnent may be imparted to the object with a minimum of frictional resistance, for in frictional resistance resides the essential difficulty to be overcome.

A further object is to providea construction which may be operated or driven by mechanism residing in the object itself, and which may be actuated by a contained spring.

The invention can best be seen and understood by reference to the drawing in which the in vention is shown applied to an object in simulaI tion of a snake.

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the object;

Fig. 2 is a horizontal cross section thereof longitudinally the object onthe line 2.2 of Fig. l. Fig. 3 is a cross section thereof on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a side elevation of oneof ments later to be referred to.

Fig. 5 is a cross section of the element onthe line 5-5 of Fig. 4. f

Fig. 6 is a plankof another of the elements later to be referred to.

Fig. 7 is an end elevation ofthe element shown in Fig. 6. f

Fig. 8 is a side elevation of a modified type of element later to be referred to. v l

Fig. 9 is an end elevation of the element shown in Fig. 8; and

Fig. 10 is a plan of the head of the object with the top section thereof removed to show the the elell is a side elevation of an elemental part of the actuating mechanism. f

Referring to the drawing: I represents the body of the snake, 2 the tip at the tail end, and 3 the head. The body of the snake is made up of a plurality of segments 4 fashioned in manner to collectively give form to the snake. The segments may be made of any suitable material possessing especially the qualities of lightness andv smoothness of surface thatwill impart as little frictional resistance as possible. The `segments may be` made of wood, but preferably from some composition material which maybe formed by molding, or stamping. The tip 2 atthe tail end of the snake maybe made out of the same material as the bodyv segments, but is made more or less elongated, and narrowing-tol a point at the extreme tip end. The. head is (Cl. Li6-152) made in separable sections `5 and 6, starmgied` or,- otherwise formedout of thin-metal plate. The head is preferably made relatively large for within it is located the mechanism which operates,I or furnishes the power for imparting sinuosity to,y the snake. The mechanism is supported by a frame 8 located within the head and affixed to the lower section 6 thereof in any suitable manner, as by tongues 9 on the frame passed through the metal of the section on which the frame is resting, and clinched beneath it.

The ends of the body segments 4 are convexed and concaved, respectively, the concavity to the end of each segment describing an arc of a circle whose radius is preferably substantially equal tot-he length of the segment. The convex surface of each body segment has the same relative yare so` that when the segments are brought together the joint I0 between their meeting edges will describe said arc, 'thus enabling the segments to `turn on each other, or relatively to each other. The end of the tip 2 is conveXed in the same manner as the other segments in order that theconcaved end of the body segment adjacent to it may have arcuate connection with the tip.

All the segments 4, not including the tip 2, are cored to"l form continuous slots II, I2 through thern,`within which are contained separate` ele-r ments I3, i4. Of these the element I3, contained in the slot II, acts to hold the segments together in proper operative relationship to one another and permit of sinuosity being imparted to the object. The other element I4, contained in the slot I2, is a driven element for imparting such sinuosity. The slot II is a relatively nar# row but vertically deep slot, although its vertical depth may vary, depending upon the size of the element I3 contained within it, which is narrowed as approach is made to the tail end of the object where the body segments are diminished .in size. The element i3 comprises a strip of any suitable material which will possess the quality of easy lateral` fiexibility without extensibility. In practice there is employed La relatively thin strip of vulcanized fibre, or of some Cellulosic material, preferablyy perforated throughout, to increase its flexibility. The strip is made of such width that it will, when vertically set on edge, about iill the slot Il through the segments, but with a loose fit therein in order that the segments while supported thereby lie floatingly supported thereon, with, freedom to moveinV relation to each otherl so as to be easily movable in the plane in which they are lyingfs l with the least possible friction. The ends of the strip are fixed, one end being xed to the tip 2 and the other end to the head and this preferably by fixing it to the end segment adjacent the head which is fixed to the lhead as will later be explained. With the strip thus retained the segments become loosely threaded thereon and floatingly supported thereby as aforesaid. The strip also acts to prevent the segments turning relatively to one another, the segments being retained to lie in theiroriginal plane although their positions may be changed in this plane as sinuosity is imparted to the object. During the impartation of such sinuosity the segments will move, or assume changed relative positions on i the strip, by sliding thereon and by turningflaterally on each other, the convexed endI of one segment turning within the concaved end of the next adjacent segment, thus obtaining high iex- 0 ibiiity, with as inne friction as possible.

The slot I2 through the segments, in which is contained the element I4 which imparts sinuosity to the object, is a relatively narrow slot, although of suflicient width to loosely contain 51 the lelement i4 which consists of a metal rod, or

wire, of generally sinusoidal or helicoidal form and of such appreciable size as will enable it to retain its shape without flexing when rotated within the slot I2. In depth, or vertical height,

aoithe slot I2 is made as deep as the size of the segments will permit, in order to receive an element I4 that may rotate vwithout exing within the slot and describe when turned as large a circle ,as possible, for upon the size of this circle will depend the extent to which sinuosity can be.

imparted to the object. Necessarily the circle within which the element I4 may turn will vary according to the size of the segments within which the slots I2 are made. Where the seg- '1ments are made smallenand the slots I2 of less vertical depth, the element, or rod, I4 will necessarily be formed to turn within a smaller circle than do other parts of the rod which turn within a larger circle where the segments are made i5-larger and the slots I2 therein of increased vertical depth. In any event, the circle described by any part of the rod as the rod is turned should not Abe greater in its outside diameter than the vertical depth of the slot within which said any part of the rod is turning.

The element, or rod, I4 has ends I5 and I 6, respectively. Between these ends the rod is preferably made in the form of an elongated helix, as shown in Fig. 6. It might be vmade,

also, with single plane sinuosity, as shown in Fig. 8. Of the ends I5 and I6 of the rod, the end I5 extends through the back of the frame 8 located in the head, and through a bearing I8 on this frame. The inner end of the rod accordingly is arranged to turn within the head 3 in separate spaced bearings. The opposite end I5 of the rod is socketed to turn within the tip 2 at the tail end of the object. The ends I5 and l lie within the axis around which the rod I4' turns, and as the -rod,`made helicoidal, or

sinuous, as aforesaid, is turned within the slots I2 in which it lies the body segments I 4 of the object will accordingly be displaced by the rod to the right or left by the bearing of vthe rod against the interior side walls of the sockets within the segments whereby adjacent groups of segments will be displaced laterally in opposite" directions relative to each other, thus imparting sinuosity to the object.l The helicoidal or sinu- 76 'ous form of the rod should be so elongated rthat its bearing against the body segments will be a gradual and easy bearing in order to eliminate frictional resistance as much as possible. As the segments become thus displaced they will move upon the element, or strip, I3 upon which they i are floatingly supported.l They will also turn upon each other, the end one of the body segments turning upon the tail piece. These movements take place with little frictional resistance owingto the mannervin-` which the body segments are mounted upon the strip I3, and the I arced jointure between them.

' i 'I'he rod I 4 is turned by a driving mechanism 20 located within the head, and which impartsA yits power to a face gear 2| on the `end of the rod It. The driving Amechanism 2!) includes a coiled spring 22 karranged upon a winding shaft 23 which aligns an opening 24 in the side of the head, and is wound by means of a key. The driving mechanism includes, also, an escapement 25 co-operating with a star wheel 26 for preventing retraction of the spring when wound.

The escapement is provided with a finger release 25 which projects through an opening 2 in the head. While'sinuosity of movement is imparted tothe object by the mechanism thusfar described, the object is rendered movable in a longitudinal direction, or made to travel, by

means of a set of wheels 28 fixed to a shaft '29 and projecting through the under side ofthe head. The vtraction afforded by these wheels with the floor, or other surface on which the object is placed, enables it to travel over such surface. 'f

The two sections '5 and of the head have preferably a snap' fastening engagementV with i one another which enables them to be combined, or the top section removed on undoing the fas-` lease the top section and permit of its removal' the bottom section can be pinched sufficiently to disengage the slots 33 therein from the tongues 32 on the top section, when the top section may be lifted and removed.

A further advantage of this construction for uniting the two head sections resides inthe fact that when the sides of the bottom section are contracted, and held contracted by the interlocking engagement of the top section as aforesaid, the sides of the bottom section will grip and hold the foremost one of the body segments 4 of the object which slips into a neck extension 34 to the bottom section, and when its sides are contracted the sides of the extension will grip and hold the segment, thus obtaining a finished connection between the body segments of the` object and the head. y

Two of the strips I3 upon which the segments are floatingly arranged are preferably employed. as better balance isvimparted thereby to the device during the operation thereof. 'l

While it is described that the end of the element or rod, I4 is socketed to turn within the tip 2 at the tail end of the object, and which is a construction more to be desired,yet this may` bemsy dispensed with and a good result will be obtained in the animation of the object, inasmuch asthe rod is retained Within the head at points of separate bearings well spaced from one another, thereby maintaining the rod to turn around its axis for eiecting displacementJ in opposite directions of groups of body segments, as previously explained.

I claim:

l. A toy imitative of an object havingsinuosity of movement, comprising head and tail ends and a body comprising a plurality of assembled segments having a plurality of relatively narrow but vertically deep slots extending, respectively, continuously through them, a laterally flexible substantially inextensible strip fixed to extend edgewise through one of said` slots in said body and upon which strip said segments in loose assembly are oatingly arranged, a rod extending through another of said slots in said'body with ends retained to turn Within said head and tail ends, respectively, that portion of the rod extending through the slots in said body being formed to describe when turned a generally sinusoidal curve whereby adjacent groups of said body segments will be displaced laterally in opposite direc tions relative to each other and sinuosity be thereby imparted to the toy as the rod is turned,r

said rod being substantially inflexible during the turning thereof and turning within circles of which the circle describedby any'part of the rod as the rod is turned is not greater in its outside ,diameter than the vertical depth of the slot within which said any part of the rod is turning, and means for turning said rod.

2. Atoy imitative of an object having sinuosity of movement, comprising head and tail ends and a body comprising a plurality of assembled segments, the ends of which are concaved and convexed, respectively, and which segments have, also, a plurality of relatively narrow but vertically deep slots extending, respectively, continuously through them, a laterally flexible substantially inextensible strip xed to extend edgewise through one of said slots in said body and upon which strip said segments in loose assembly are floatingly arranged, a rod extending through another ci said slots in said body with ends retained to turn within said head and tail ends, respectively, that portion of the rod extending through the slots in said body being formed to describe when turned 'a generally sinusoidal curve whereby adjacent groups of said body segments will be displaced laterally in opposite directions relative to each other and sinuosity be thereby imparted to the toy as the rod. is turned, said rod being substantially inflexible during the turning thereof and turning within circles of which the circle described by any part of the rod as the rod is turned is not greater in its outside diameter than the vertical depth of the slot Within which said any part of the rod is turning, and means for turning said rod.

3. A toy imitative of an object having sinuosity of movement, comprising a head and a body comprising a plurality of assembled segments having a plurality of relatively narrow but vertically deep slots` extending, respectively, continuously throughthem, a laterally flexible substantially inextensible strip fixed to extend edgewise through one of said slots in said body andy upon which strip said segments in loose assembly are floatingly arranged, a rod extending through another of said slots in said body with end retained to turn within said head, that portion of the rod extending through the slots in saidy body being formed to describe when turned a generally sinuosidal curve whereby adjacent groups of said body segments will be displaced laterally in opposite directions relative to each other and sinuosity be thereby imparted to the toy as the rod is turned, said rod being substantially inflexible during the turning thereof and turning within circles of which the circle described by any part of the rod as the rod is turned is not greater in its outside diameterl than the vertical depth of the 'slot within which said any part oi' in said body and upon which strip said segments in loose assembly are loatingly arranged, a rod extending through anotherof said slots in said body with end retained to turn Within said head, that portion of the rod extending through the slots in said body being formed to describe when turned a generally sinusoidal curve whereby acljacent groups of saidbody segments will be displaced laterally in opposite directions relative to f each other and sinuosity be thereby imparted` to the toy as the rod is turned, said rod being substantially inflexible during the turning thereof and turning within circles of which the circle described by any part of the rod as the rod is turned is not greater in its outside diameter than the vertical depth of the slot within which said any part of the rod is turning, and means for turning said rod.

5. A toy imitative of an object vhaving sinuosity of movement, comprising a head and a body comprising a plurality of assembled segments having a plurality of relatively narrow but vertically deep Islots extending, respectively, continuously through them, a laterally flexible substantially inextensible strip xed to extend edgewise through one of said slots in said body and upon which strip said segments in loose assembly are oatingly arranged, a rod extending through another of said slots in said body with end retained to turn within said head, that portion of the rod extending through the slots in said body being formed to describe when turned a generally sinusoidal curve whereby adjacent groups of said body segments will be displaced laterally in opposite directions relative to each other and sinuosity be thereby imparted to the toy as the rod is turned, said rod being substantially inflexible during the turning thereof and turning within circles of which the circle described by any part of the rod as therod is turned is not greater in its outside diameter than the vertical depth of the slot within which said any part of the rod is turning, means for turning said rod, and an actuating mechanism including a spring located in said head.

HARRY D. ADAMS.

yeo

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2507787 *Nov 24, 1945May 16, 1950Hotchner FredAnimated display
US2611645 *Mar 25, 1948Sep 23, 1952Benjamin FormanFluid spraying device
US3027681 *Sep 1, 1959Apr 3, 1962Hurst Jessie MRattler
US3229421 *Feb 20, 1963Jan 18, 1966Ostrander Robert KPower operated dolls
US3490172 *Mar 3, 1967Jan 20, 1970Schwartz ArthurElectrically operated toy worm
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US8641472 *Feb 1, 2010Feb 4, 2014China Industries LimitedToy snake
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Classifications
U.S. Classification446/353, 446/368, 40/614
International ClassificationA63H11/12, A63H11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63H11/12
European ClassificationA63H11/12