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Publication numberUS2194690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1940
Filing dateApr 25, 1938
Priority dateApr 25, 1938
Publication numberUS 2194690 A, US 2194690A, US-A-2194690, US2194690 A, US2194690A
InventorsClayton Edwin C, Heffner Lawrence L
Original AssigneeWm E Hooper & Sons Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Painting composition
US 2194690 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

lUb. UUlvlluollluwo, EATING R PLASTIC,"

Patented Mar. 26, 1940 PATENT 2,194,690 mm'mro COMPOSITION Edwin 0. Clayton and Lawrence L. Heflner, Baltimore, Md., assignors to Wm. E. Hooper ,& Sons Company, Woodberry, Baltimore, Md, a corporation of Maryland No Drawing. Application April 25, 1938,

Serial No. 204,140

21 Claims. (01. 134-44) This application is, in part, a continuation of application 165,168.

Thisinvention pertains to a coating composititon suitable for application to numerous materials. It resembl s a paint in that it may when made according to the preferred formula be applied by brushing, spraying and dipping where the articles are of a convenient size but it is further possible and, in some instances, desirable m to impregnate various articles by means ofJvacuum, or pressure and in some instances a second dipping, brushing or spraying or addittional impregnation under pressure is effective in replacing the composition which has entered the 5 pores of the material. The composition does not go entirely thru the material being treated and while it penetrates some distance below the surface does not thoroughly impregnate. It does, however, penetrate. suificiently beneath the sur- 20 face to protect and waterproof the surface.

ing, much longer and do not become chalky or' powdery in appearance as soon as surfaces paint- 30 ed with the previous products. The composition of the invention further possesses adhesive qualities which cause it to cling tenaciously and permanently to iron and steel surfaces whileat the same time it prevents rust and the growth of 35 mildew and'fungus which tend to accumulate at certain times of the .year being in some instances carried by the pollen in the air and deposited from other sources. The composition further possesses a marked afiinity for galvanized iron which is most difiicult to keep covered, because of the oil used in rolling and preserving the sheets and also because of the tendency of the zinc to flake oif bringing the paint or surface coating with it. The coating composition is also 5 ideally suited to be applied to lumber, and vari ous types of wall boards which are sold under the trade names of Celotex, made from sugar cane fibre, and Upson board, a tightly pressed card ;board of varying thicknesses, also compo board 50 which is very similar to the latter but not quite so dense, Beaverboard, gypsum board, veneer board, and the like. In all of these instances the board in questionis supplied by the manufacturers in convenient construction sizes. The com- 55 posititon of this invention may readily be applied to these products during manufacture; and the coated and impregnated, manufacturedarticle may be applied as such to the wall or other structure as desired. The board thus treated has been proved by actual tests to be'rendered highly resistant to water, mildew and fire;

It is a well known fact that the inflammable character of these wall boards is such that their use has been limited on account of the f re risk: Because of the fire-proof properties which have been added bytreatment with the composition of the invention and the attractivecolors in which this composition may be made, the use and application of these various boards will be'. greatly extended.

As the paint of the invention does not interfere with the adhesive used, the veneer boards, which generally consist of several thin layers of wood tightly-cemented together; may, to a great ad-' vantage, have a coating of our composition between each pair of adjacent layers, the resulting board being not only fire resistant but unburm able in that it does not support combustion.

- s As compared to the painting composition of the invention, the film formed on surfaces by" the majority'of paints'is such that the fire hazard is greatly increasedby using them and such paints aid in spreading fire rather than retarding it.

In addition'to, the various wall boards, shingles may be treated, impregnated and coated at the factory so that they possess fire'resisting properties to the highest degree which has prOveduseful. In this way the insurance restrictions -now in force against shingles can be met and satisfied and eventually abolished as to shingles fire proofed in this way. The spark and fire resistance imparted to the shingles by impregnating and or ccating with the composition of our invention lasts many years. The shingles may also be coated on the'wall. Y

Lumber, such as piling used in the construction of docks and piers maybe treated and impregnated with the-composition of the invention after which the piling and lumber is not only fire resistant, but possesses great resistance to' various marine growths which'tend to collect on construction of this character and to quickly. destroy it. v

Another slightly different form of the painting composition of the invention is designed to be applied to ships bottoms,the antiseptic properties of this composition retard or prevent the collection of marine growths which foul the bottoms of ships greatly. reducing their speed. Such growths. penetrate and eventually destroy the ships. The fire-proofing properties of the com-' Search Room COATING OR PLASTIC.

position are not needed for this particular application but it so happens the materials which possess these flame proofing qualities attack the fungi forming organisms very vigorously.

Our painting composition has furtherdemonstrated its usefulness when applied to corrugated fibre boxes or cartons. These boxes may be painted, sprayed or dipped or even coated by means of rolls. As an example of the protection which is afforded when corrugated board is coated with this invention a small carton 7" x '7" x8" was given two coats of the composition of our invention, a small can of Sterne was ignited and placed inside so that the top. of the can was 3" from the top wall of the box. Three minutes of exposure to this heat failed to ignite this coated carton. When an untreated box was exposed to this same test, it quickly ignited in less than one minute and the fiame was of such intensity. that the entire box was rapidly'consumed when the lighted can of Sterno was removed.

The coating described in this invention is extremely compatible with paints which have previously been applied to surfaces of wood, iron, and cardboard and other material tending to hold them firmly in place and not loosen them: A successful coating foroutside use'suitable, for metallic, fibrous and other types of surface is 16.8% Chlorinated parafiine(chlorinated organic material) 6.0% Chlorinated, rubber (chlorinated organic The percent sign may be read parts and the proportions may be changed and other ingredients may be added without departure from the invention. The foregoing formula is selected as an example found to be most effective for this purpose. i

Any type of inert pigment or filler generally used for paint can be employed. Examples of satisfactory pigments are: white lead, zinc oxide, lithopon e, titanium dioxide, antimony oxide, the oxides of lead; red, yellow and black iron oxide; earth colors, such as ochers, umbers, siennas; cadmium sulphide, antimony sulphide, arsenic sulphide, ultramarine blue, prussian blue, chrome green, chromium oxide, verte antique, carbon black, lamp black, etc.

When so desired, other ingredients such as drying oils may be added to change the'brushing characteristics or time of drying etc.; the percentage of such oils is kept as low as feasible so as not to impair the flame resistance of the coating. Any quantity not giving-too great inflammability for the purpose in hand may be used.

The percentage andthe amount of the borate may also be varied by a few percent each way. This, to a large extent, depends on the character of the pigments and fillers used and to the degree of flame resistance, mildew and fungus resist; ance desired.

The proportions of chlorinated paraffine and chlorinated rubber may be varied to suitthe re:

quirements of brushing, type of surface, and de"- require less chlorinated paraifine and more chlorinated rubber.

Solvents which may satisfactorily be used are coal tar naphtha, chlorinated hydro-carbon solvents, such as carbon tetra chloride, other solvents such as ethyl acetate. Turpentine may be used, but only in small amounts combined with any of the other solvents named.

A mildew resisting waterproof and fiame resist- 1.

ing composition used with success as a base or sealing coating for interior walls or other similar surfaces not exposed to the weather and Where color is not a factor, comprises:

Parts by weight Chlorinated paraffine or paraffine oil 16.8 Chlorinated rubber 6.0 Tricresyl phosphate--plasticizer 1.2 Zinc borate-filler insoluble borate 3.6 S01Vent- 40.0

I Parts by weight Chlorinated paraffine' 18.0 I

Chlorinated rubber 6.0 Tricresyl phosphate 6.0. Zinc borate 15.0

Paris green (cupric aceto arsenite) 15.0 Solvent (coal tar naphtha, chlorinat'ed hydro-carbon solvents, such as carbon tetra chloride, ester solvents such as ethyl acetate, etc.) 40.0 to 50.0

It is our intent that this anti-fouling paint be kept, to a. certain extent, relatively soft and pliable, and, so farm is possible, to permit a gradual release of the fungus-destroying properties so that there is a light film of this released material-surrounding the coated substance at all times. This gradual release very greatly aids the destruction of the -.marihe growth. Experience has shown that a hardinflexible surface rarely, if ever, is able to repell these marine growths which. attach themselves to this hard surface. The last fcirmula above has the properties just stated to a satisfactory degree.

A satisfactory painting composition closely similar to the formula first stated is 25% of substantially 60% chlorinated parafiine', or paraffine oil, sometimes referred to in the "trade as neutral oil; 10% similarly chlorinated rubber; 5% tricresyl phosphate;. 15% zinc borate; 25% pigment and filler, and 26% volatile solvent of said chlorinated materials and phosphate. The solvent and filler, etc. being in any desired quantity to give the desired consistency, so that the proportion of the formula, being subject to variation, the words parts by weight may be logically substituted for the per cent. sign in the above formula. This formula gives a very thick paint, or paste, which would, ordinarily, be thinned for use by the addition of the desired amount of solvent. Y

While chlorinated paraffine oil in the proportions stated in the specific formulas herein recited, is particularly effective with chlorinated rubher, said proportions being-approximately three \Ji'fell bit "sulfu pose are: chlorinated parafiine oil, or neutral oil,

chlorinated vinyl-resin, castor oil, fish oil, soya bean oil and other vegetable oils. Though these other oils are equivalents, and usable, theyare less satisfactory.

The effectiveness of these materials, combined in the proportions stated, as a highly fiexlgle/ strongly adhesive paint, which adheres per anently to numerous substances not previously regarded as capable of permanent coating, is regarded as imparting inventive importance to this combination for this purpose; however, the effectiveness of this paint as to its fire and mildew-resisting properties and its power to repel the attacksof insects, and its preservative action otherwise than as a mere coating, which is water-proof, but not in itself burnable or capable of supporting combustion, is dependent on the presence of the borate' in finely divided solid form, suspended in the chlorinated material and, attached thereby to the painted surface. The borates used, zinc, zorate being most generally effective, are water insoluble so that they do not interfere with the water-proofing properties and are fusible at the combustion temperatures encountered so that they form a fire resistive coating, which protects the material treated from creeping, glowing and retention of the fire, as distinguished from fiaming, which is prevented, in the presence of the borate, by the discharge of gases containing chlorine, due to the disposition of the chlorinated materials at the temperatures of combustion.

In addition to zinc borate, manganese borate, manganous borate and magnesium borate, are known to serve at least the fire-proofing function to a satisfactory degree, and to beso nearly insoluble in water as not to interfere with fireproofing. Zinc borate is, however, more effective in resisting the growth offungus, attacks by in sects, worms, marine growths, etc., and similar tendencies to deterioration.

Any water insoluble salt, which is fusible at these temperatures and does not give off oxygen when heated, would servethe fire-proofing function to a reasonably satisfactory degree.

The product made in accordance with the fOI. mulas stated is entirely satisfactory for application by dipping, and spraying and for impregnation by immersion under pressure, or for impregnation 'at atmospheric pressure where the. penetrating qualities of the material are relied upon, or by the vacuum process.

.Although the paint dries very quickly, it is satisfactory for application. by brushing where the area painted is not brushed over after it has become tacky;=in other words, it is necessary to complete brushing promptly as to each area painted, and not to brush over it later than two or three, or possibly five minutes after it is first I coated, except where a second coat is applied after drying of the first coat.

Where it is considered desirable to make a paint for application by brushing, which is adapted for manipulation after the manner of the ordinary linseed oil and lead paints, and to sacrifice for this purpose, a portion of the fireproofing properties, a corresponding proportion of an' oxidizing oil may be introduced into the fire-proof formulas above recited.

Various oxidizing oils may be used for this purpose, and the formula may be modified. Underthe conditions and for the purposes just stated, the following formula has been found satisfactory:

Pounds Solution highly chlorinated parafiin and 30% monochlor benzene or salveso) 33 oxidizable oil ,i 15 Titanium oxideiTiOg) 30 Antimony oxide (SbOz) 30 Zinc borate (ZnB4O7) 16 Coal tar naphtha (known in the trade as 250-w) 5 '70 Highly chlorinated rubber 10 Japan dryer 1 This formula, as above described, contains 60% solids, the formula being subject to considerable variation. These solids may be described as 40% wet solids; i. e. fluid, or semi-fluid, and 60% dry solids, or non-fluids.

The wet solids comprise 50%; i. e. 20% of the entire solid content-chlorinated parafi'ine60% chlorinated being regarded as the standard of high chlorination, though the exact degree of chlorination is not important. The wet solids also include 30%, or 12% of the whole solid content, of oxidizable oil and 20%, i. e. 8% of the entire solid content--ch1orinated rubber.

The dry solids, comprising 60% of the entire solids in the above formula, may comprise 40% TiOz, titanium oxide, 1.- e. 24% of all the solids in the paint, and these dry solids may also include 40% antimony oxide, SbOz, the same comprising 24% of all'the solids in the paint. The dry solids also include approximately 20% zincborate, equal to 12% of all-the solids in the paint. As to the entire composition including the solvent, which is, of course, varied to give the de sired texture to the paint, the chlorinated paraffine, or parafiine oil, is 12% of the entire composition, ,the oxidizable oil 7.2%, chlorinated rubber 4.8%, the titanium oxide 14.4%, the antimony oxide 14.4%, the zinc borate, 7.2% and the solvent about 40%the formula being variable to a considerable degree, and the percentages named being actually parts by weight, deduced from the formula as first stated in units of pounds.

While linseed oil is the drying, or oxidizable oil, which has been employed according to the above formula to give brushing qualities to the used to advantage as pigment and filler in the other formulas, being introduced-into this formula for this purpose. While they have particular advantages, other pigments and fillersmay be used.

The painting compositionwhich may also be employed for impregnation of porous materials having a high degree of penetration, may be mixed in: accordance with the practicerwhich-iis wellknown in the manufacture of paints-the ingredients being combined in any preferred order to give the desired texture, being, preferably ground in a paint mill, or equivalent apparatus.

The painting composition, as a coating, has the important advantage that it possesses adhesiveness to the highest degree, and is not affected by any oily or greasy deposit, which may be on the surface of the material. coated, or by the presence of a coat of the ordinary paints. This is of particular advantage innot only repainting previously painted surfaces, but in the treatment of galvanized iron and steel, which are not only inclined to be greasy on account of the oil used in the galvanizing process, but also inclined to losetheir zinc surface due to flaking, which with other paints, causes the paint coating to be destroyed. The adhesiveness of the present material and the tenacity, strength, and durability of the coating has an important effect in'preventing this deterioration by flaking.

While the paint as a'coating, as well as in the capacity of an impregnating agent, has important advantages in that it possesses weather'- prooiing, water-proofing, and mildew-proofing properties to the highest degree, and is alsoliighly effective in repelling the attacks of insects, marine growths, toredo worms and the like, and is more resistive to weathering than the well known painting compositions, its fire resistive and flame-proofing properties are even of greater importance. It is also of interest that the solvents used 'arequickly evaporated at normal atmospheric pressure and temperature.

It is of great advantage that the inert material including, the pigments and fillers used, and also to some degree the borate, apparently assists in the protection of the chlorinated materials, from dechlorination by action of the weather, whereby they have in other so-called fire-proof paints been rendered useless for the protection of surfaces exposed to the action of the weather, particularly the suns rays and moisture, other light and heat rays having a similar effect, though generally to a lesser degree. In the matter of giving fire, resistive properties, the zinc borate and equivalent materials are of great importance in that they have an important efiect in supplementing the action of thechlorine containing gases given off by the chlorinated materials. The gases do not prevent creeping of the fire and, or the resumption of burning when the release of the gases is discontinued for any reason. The fused berate, or similar insoluble salt, combined with the filler and pigment, serves this purpose most effectively, forming, by fusing of the borate, or similar salt, a fire-proof coating in the highly heated-area. Known equivalents of the borate, (H) which are slightly inferior in the point of mildewproofing and similar functions, are, manganese borate, manganous borate, and magnesium. bo-

rateother equivalents being probably available. These materials, which are in finely divided form, as impalpable powder, should be fusible at or belowthe combustion temperature of the materials protected, anzdfor water -proofing and the like, they should be water insoluble. Those named are insoluble in water, or nearly so. The solvents used do not dissolve the borate or the filler or the pigment, all ofwhich are finely divided solids.

The organic materials as chlorinated rubber and chlorinated rubber and chlorinated paraffine are preferably above 60% chlorinated, but a higher degree of chlorination is not harmful and a Cross Reference when subjected to high temperatures, and (3011- I sequent destructionby heat is not absolutely prevented,the matcrials treated in this way will not support combustion nor will they burn when the source of external heat is removed, being selfextinguished as described in connection withthe corrugated box experiment.

While. certain specific formulas have been disclosed, these are capable of a reasonable degree of variation and certain ingredients may be added to give drying and brushing properties. Where inflammable materials are added, the proportions of these materials must be kept extremely low if the fire resisting 'properties are to be retained. .While the formulas given are specific as to our formulas which have been found highly satisfactory in actual use and have very important ad vantages, it is also known that the chlorinated materials, and borate, may he efiectively employed in proportions varied as indicated in connection with, the formulas given as most satisfactory for v the 'uset-o which the decomposition is to be appliedthe pigment and filler and plasticizer being usable in the proportions named, or similar proportions, andthe solvent being determined largely according to the fluidity desired, being preferably in the proportions named.

While the formula may be varied as above, the combination of highly chlorinatedrubber and highly chlorinated parafiine in substantially the proportions named, gives an important novel result in, painting and impregnation as above outlined.

We have thus. described specifically and in detail a coating composition embodying our invention, including several difierent formulas adapted to the respective purposes of the invention as already outlined, the description being specific and in detail in order that the manner of operating, applying and usingthe invention may be fully understood! however, the. specific terms herein are used descriptively rather than in a limited sense, the scope of the invention being defined in the claims. What we claim as new and Letters Patent is:

1. A coating. and impregnating composition, also adapted for use in and on wall board of cellulosic materials and between the plies of laminated sheets of cellulosic materials, such as wood or paper, the composition having fire, water and mildew-resisting properties, and comprising substantially 17 parts of approximately to 60% chlorinated parafline, 6 parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinat'dfrubber, approximately 1 part tricresyl phosphate, parts,pig ment and inert filler,,-"14 parts zinc borat'e, and 4,0 parts volatile solvent, which is evaporated iri diying at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

2; A mildew-resisting, water-proof, flame resisting composition for use as a base, or sealing desire to secure by tiearch doom coating, comprising approximatelyl'l'parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated parafiine,

6 parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated rubber, approximately 15 parts tricresyl phosphate, approximately 3 parts zinc borate and sufficient of volatile solvent, whichevaporates in the air at normal temperatures, to provide for application by brushing or spraying.

3. A coating composition .for submerged surfaces and to resist marine growths,,comprising approximately 18 partsv approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated paraffine, 6 parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated rubber, 6 parts tricresyl phosphate, 15 parts zinc borate, 15 parts cupric aceto, arsenite, and sufiicient of volatile solvent to provide for application by brushing or spraying-thesolvent beingcapable of evaporation at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures. 4. A coating and impregnating, or similar composition, also adapted for use in and on wall board of cellulosic materials and between the plies of laminated sheets of cellulosic materials, such as wood or paper, the composition comprising approximately 15-to 20 parts approximately 50% to chlorinated parafiine, ap-l proximately 5 to 10 parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated rubber, a relativelysmall percentage of plasticizer, approximately 3 to 15% of a substantially'water insoluble salt, fusible at or near the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials, and adapted to form, when fused, a fire resisting coating which checks the creeping of the fire, the same being one which does not give off, oxygen when thus heated, manganese I borate, manganous borate and magnesium borate, and sufiicient of a volatile solvent of the chlorinated materials to provide for application by brushing or spraying; the solvent beingcapable of evaporation in drying at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

5. A painting composition comprising 25% of substantially 50 to 60% chlorinated parafiine, 10% similarly chlorinated rubber, 5% tricresyl phosphate, 15% of a water insoluble salt which does not give off oxygen when heated and which fuses at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials as wood and the like, the same being in finely divided solid form and mixed with the other materials, 25% pigment and filler, 20% volatile solvent of said chlorinated materials andphosphate.

6. A coating, or similar composition, comprising major proportions of approximately 50 to 60% chlorinated parafline, approximately onethird to one-half as much similarly chlorinated off oxygen when heated and which fuses'at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials as wood and the like, the same being in finely divided form, and mixed with theother materials, in substantially less proportions than the chlorinated materials combined, the minimum being approximately 5% of the mixture, a pigment and filler and a volatile solvent for the chlorinated materials which does not dissolve the said fusible salt, a filler and pigment. I

7. A painting composition, comprising solids and solvent, the solids comprising approximately 30% of substantially 60% chlorinated organic ma terials, approximately A; of the chlorinated ma terials being chlorinated rubber, and the reminder, being another chlorinated organic material, which acts to impart flexibility to the rubher: when dried the same being selected from the group consisting of the following chlorinated materials, paraffine oil; neutral oil, vinyl resin, castor oil, fish oil, soya bean oil, 12% oxidizable oil and filler and pigment the solids also comprising a considerable proportion of a salt which fuses at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials and when thus fused, forms a fire resisting coating which prevents creeping oi the fire, said salt being water insoluble and also of a nature which does not give ofi oxygen when thus heated.

8. A painting, or similar composition, the solids in which comprise approximately 30% of substantially 60% chlorinated organic materials, approximately of the chlorinated materials being chlorinated rubber, and the remainder being another chlorinated organic material which serves to impart flexibility to the rubber when dried the same being selected from the group consisting of the following chlorinated materials, paraffine oil, neutral oil, vinyl resin, castor oil, fish oil, soya bean oil, the solids also including a water insoluble borate in finely divided form, the same being fusible at the combustion temperatures of the cellulosic materials treated and serving to form a coating which retards the creeping of the fire said salt being one which does not give off oxygen when heated, the remainder of the solids being of an inert nature, serving as pigment, filler, etc., and part of the filler having the function of protecting the chlorinated material from decomposition by light and weather.

9. A coating and impregnating composition also adapted as an ingredient for use in or on wall boards of cellulose material and between the laminations of laminated materials consisting of solids and solvent the solids comprising in the neighborhood of one third of 60% chlorinated organic materials approximately one third of the chlorinated materials being chlorinated rubber and the remainder of the chlorinated material being another chlorinated organic material which imparts flexibility to the chlorinated rubber when I dried the same being selected from the group consisting of the following chlorinated materials, paramne .oil, neutral oil, vinyl resin, castor oil, fish .oil, soya bean oil the remainder of the solids comprising inert filler and a salt which fuses at the combustion temperatures of the cellulose material forming a coating which tends to prevent creeping of fire and which salt is water insoluble and does not give off oxygen when thus heated.

10. A coating and impregnating, or similar composition, also adapted for use in and on wall board of cellulosic materials, the composition comprising approximately 15 to 20 parts approxirubber, a water insoluble salt which does not give mately 50% to 60% chlorinated parafiine, approximately 5 to 10 parts approximately 50% to 60% chlorinated rubber, a relatively small percentage of fire-resistive plasticizer, approximately 3 to 15% of a substantially water in soluble salt, fusible at or near the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials, the same being selected from the group consisting of zinc borate, manganese borate, manganous borate and magnesium borate, and sufficient of a volatile solvent of the chlorinated materials, and an oxidizable .oil to provide for application by brushing; the solvent being capable of evaporation in drying at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

11. A coating and impregnating composition for cellulosic materials also adapted for use in and on wall board of cellulosic material and between'the plies of laminated sheets of cellulosic material, the composition having fire, water I061 COMPOSITIONS,

QQATING OR PLASTIC,

of said cellulosic materials and is substantially insoluble in water, the same being in finely divided solid form and approximately forty parts of a volatile solvent of said chlorinated materials and p-lasticizer which is evaporated in drying at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

12. A mildew resisting, water proof, flame resisting composition for use as a base or sealing coating, the same consisting of approximately seventeen parts of approximately fifty to sixty percent chlorinated paraffine, six parts of similarly chlorinated rubber, approximately fifteen parts of tri-cresyl phosphate, three parts .of a water insoluble salt which fuses at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials and which doesnot give off oxygen when heated, the same being in finely divided solid form and mixed with said other components, and sufficient volatile solvent which evaporates in the air at normal temperatures to provide for application by brushing or spraying.

13. A coating composition for submerged surfaces to' resist marine growths, comprising'approximately eighteen parts of substantially fifty to sixty percent chlorinated parafiine, approximately six parts of similarly chlorinated rubber/ six parts of tri-cresyl phosphate,- fifteen parts of zinc borate, fifteen'parts of cupric aceto arsenit'e, and suificient volatile solvent to provide for application by brushing or spraying the solvent being capable of evaporation at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

14. A coating and impregnating or similar composition for wood and similarly burnable materials, also adapted for use on wall boardand betweentheplies of laminated-sheets such as WOOd' or paper, the composition-comprising approximately fifteen to twenty part of approximately fifty to sixty percent chlorinated parafiine,

approximately five to ten-parts of approximately fifty to sixty-percent chlorinated rubber, a relatively small percentage of --plasticiz'er, approximately three to fifteen percent of a substantially water insoluble salt which does not give 'offioxygen when heated and is fusible at or near the'combustion temperatures of said material; thesame being in finely divided solid form, and "sufficient of a volatile solvent of the chlorinated materials to provide for application-by brushing orspraying, the solvent being capable of evaporation drying at normal atmospheric temperatures;

15. A painting composition comprising solids and solvents the solids comprising approximately thirty percent of approximately fifty to sixty per cent chlorinated organic material, approximately a third of said chlorinated organic materials being chlorinated rubber and the remainder "being another similarly chlorinated organic material which serves to impart flexibility to the chlorinated rubber when dried, the same being selected from the group consisting of the following chlorinated materials, parafiine oil, neutral :oil, vinyl resin, castor'oil, fish oil, soya bean oil, and an oxidizable oil, filler, pigment and a water insoluble salt. which fuses at the combustion temperatures, of cellulosicmaterials forming a brass lieierence approximately fifty to sixty percent chlorinated organic material, approximately one third of the organic materials being chlorinated rubber and the remainder of thechlorinated material being another similarly chlorinated organic material selectedfrom the group consisting of parafiine I;

oil, neutral oil, vinyl resin, 'castor oil, fish oil, soyabean oil, which chlorinated material imparts flexibility to the rubber when dried, the remainder of the solids comprising inert filler and a water insoluble salt which fuses at the comof similarly chlorinated rubber, a relatively small A percentage of plasticizer, approximately threeto fifteen percent of a substantially water insoluble salt which does-not give off oxygen when-heated and which is fusible at combustion temperatures of said materials, thesame being in finely divided solid form and'mixed with said other chlorinated materials and oxidizable oil to provide for ap plication by brushing, the solvent being capable of evaporation'in drying at normal atmospheric temperatures and pressures.

5 18. A coating or similar composition comprising major proportions of 50% to 60% chlorinated parafiine, approximately one third to, one half gas much similarly chlorinated rubber, a Water :insoluble salt which does not give off oxygen when heated and which fuses at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials aswood and ,the like, the same being in finely divided solid '59 ,form and a water insoluble pigment and filler vsufilcient to substantially protect the chlorinated 1material from decomposition by light' and weather,- a substantial proportion of said pigment being arsenic. sulphide and a volatilesolvent for the chlorinated materials which does not dissolve thesaid fusible salt.

i c 19. A-.painting or similar composition," the solids of which. comprise 30% of substantially 60% chlorinated material, approximately on'e Eco third of the chlorinated material being chlo rinated rubber, the remainder being another chlorinated material which serves toim'paitfiex ibility to the'rubber when 'driedand being selected from the group consisting of the following-materials, paramne oil neutral oilgvinyl resing cas'tor oil, fish oil, soya bean oil, the-sO'lidSal'sO includingua water insoluble saltin finely divided form the same being fusible atthe combustion'te'mperatures of the cellulosic materials treated'and 7'0' serving to -form a coating which retards the creepingof the fire, said salt being one which does .n'othgivel oif oxygen when heated, theremainder of the solidss'erving as .pigmentafiller, a substantial proportion of said pigment being antimony oxide, and part of the filler and pigments having the function of protecting the chlorinated material from decomposition by light and weather.

20. A coating or similar composition comprising major proportions of to chlorinated parafiine, approximately one third to one half as much chlorinated rubber, a water insoluble mately one third of the chlorinated materials being chlorinated rubber and the remainder of the chlorinated material being another chlorinated organic material, the same being selected from the group consisting of the following chlo- 5 rinated materials, paraffine oil, neutral oil, vinyl resin, castor oil, fish oil, soya bean oil, of a water insoluble salt which does not give off oxygen when heated and which fuses at the combustion temperatures of cellulosic materials, the salt being in finely divided solid form, and a water insoluble pigment and filler, suficient to substantially protect the chlorinated material from decomposition by light and weather, a substantial proportion of said pigment consisting of antimony 15 oxide and titanium oxide, and a volatile solventi for the chlorinated materials which does not dissolve the said fusible salt.

EDWIN C, CLAYTON. LAWRENCE L. HEFFNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426512 *Oct 28, 1944Aug 26, 1947Aerojet Engineering CorpProtective coatings
US4201642 *Sep 19, 1978May 6, 1980Celanese CorporationRadiation-curable coating composition having utility as a moisture barrier film
US4265976 *Sep 17, 1979May 5, 1981Celanese CorporationRadiation-curable coated article having moisture barrier propetes
US6030562 *Dec 4, 1997Feb 29, 2000Masonite CorporationMethod of making cellulosic composite articles
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Classifications
U.S. Classification524/405, 524/143, 523/122, 106/18, 524/313, 524/525, 524/572, 523/177
International ClassificationC08L15/00, C08L15/02, C09D5/18
Cooperative ClassificationC09D5/18, C08L15/02
European ClassificationC08L15/02, C09D5/18