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Publication numberUS2196610 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1940
Filing dateFeb 14, 1939
Priority dateFeb 14, 1939
Publication numberUS 2196610 A, US 2196610A, US-A-2196610, US2196610 A, US2196610A
InventorsGlenn Whiffen Uridge, Schlademan Karl A
Original AssigneeGlenn Whiffen Uridge, Schlademan Karl A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Javelin
US 2196610 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented A es, 1940 v UNITED STATE 5 PATENT}, "OFFICE JAVELIN Karl A. Schlademan and Uridge Glenn Pullman, -Wash.

Application February.14,f1939, Serial No. 256,288

seams (01. 272-59) Our invention relates to improvements in javelins and the like, and specifically to features in a J'avelinthat permit the manufacture of a-javelin which is easier to throw than the conventional article and is more resistant to shocks encountered in the sport, which shocks result in a high" percentage of breakage.

Iti's well known by those associated with the sport of javelin throwing that the use of relatively strong, durable wooden shafts for javelins has required the construction of a shaft thatis 'relain circumference. Conventional lighter wood would permit the construction ,of a

javelin having a relatively large circumferential measurement more nearly adapted to fit,and to.

be gripped by the hand of the athlete. This would permit him to impart a twisting motion at the moment he throws the javelin, whereby the javelin spins or rifles during its passage through the air, striking the earth without the attendant vibration which, it is recognized, brakes the Wood adjacent the ferruleat its tip. I

Theprimary object of our invention is to provide a javelin of a relatively large circumferential measurement that otherwise meets the requirements laid down by the directors of the sport of javelin throwing; and one that is adapted to be i more easily and skillfully thrown.

Another object of our invention has beento produce a javelin having a lower percentage of breakage in use. p

A. still further object of our invention is ,to provide a javelin which may be readily balanced tomeet the various circumstancesencountered availon lines 8-8 of Figure 2; and

drawing forming a part Figure 1 is a view in elevation of a Javelin of our construction;

Figure 2 is a longitudinal cross sectional View through a forward portion of our javelin;

Figure 3 is a longitudinal cross sectional view through the central portion of our javelin; 1

Figure 4 is a longitudinal cross sectional view through the trailing end of the javelin;

Figure 5 is a vertical cross sectional View taken on lines 5-5 of Figure 3; Figure 6 is a vertical cross sectional view taken on lines 6-6 of Figure 2;

Figure '7 is a vertical cross sectional View taken I on lines 1-! of Figure 3;

Figure 8 is a vertical cross sectional view taken Figure 9 is ,a longitudinal cross sectional View through a portion of the javelin adjacent the hand grip. I

h Referring to the drawing, Figure 1 illustrates ,a javelin whose shaft I is tapered at its forward end 2 for the reception of a ferrule point 3 and which also has a tapered trailing end 4 and a wrapped handle or grip 5. The shaft l is formed of a pair of long, relatively thin strips of wood 6 and I having longitudinal grooves 8 and 9 cut into one face of each ofthem. The forward end of this shaft l is providedwith tapered laminated splints l and l I for a purpose to be later described. p

Fitted to the forward'end of the shaft l is the ferrule point 3 having-an interior tapered bore 4 for the reception of the forward end of the wooden shaft. A relatively sharp impact point l2 isprovided on this member 3. The hand or grip is of the'usual construction and consists in helical wrappings of cordage l3 begun and terminated in the usual manner of such wrappings.

The adjoining grooves 8 and 9 extend throughout the length of the javelin from a point a short distance back from the leading end to a point -short of the trailing 'encL. Aflcounterweight I4 may be placed in any required'location between the shaft halves 6 and l to properly balance the javelin.,

Referring to Figure 9 the shaft halvest, 'l' are shown to have a slightly greater degree of taper to the point l5 forming a larger diameter which is abruptly reduced to the normal size and the usual hand grip 5 of wrapped cordage'l3 is provided of normal size. The resultis a streamline effect to enhance the possibilities of gaining distance when thrown.

To construct a javelin embodying the features of our invention we takesubstantially square cedar and of sufficient length to meet the requirements for a regulation javelin. This piece is split longitudinally in half. We do not wish to be limited in practicing our invention to the use of Alaska cedar but mention that wood specifically because it meets our requirement for a tough-fibered, light weight wood, its use men tioned. herein being merely illustrative. Any wood having similar characteristics, by whatever name it may be called, would be suitable.

The split pieces of the original stock are at all times paired together for use in the final construction of a unitary javelin. One of said pieces is turned end for end with relation to the other and with the result that a reversing of the grain is accomplished to increase strength and rigidity. The two rectangular pieces split from the.- square section with which we started are now formed or provided with dado grooves 8 and 9 which we have shown in the drawing to be square-cut but which, of course, could be round or of any other s rape practical to produce. These two grooves are cut in such a manner that when the rectangularstrips are joined together the grooves join and form a single longitudinal opening throughout the length of the javelin from. a point just back of the tip to a point short of the trailing en-d. At this time a suitable counterweight Hlof metal or of more dense wood may be fitted and fixed into the interior of the trailing end of the javelin according to the requirements for bal-' ance as observed at this. stage of theoperation. When the proper balance is obtainedand the grooving has been accomplished, the two rectangular strips are glued together and form the blank from which the finished: javelin is to be formed. Under certain circumstances and in order to properly strengthen the forward end of the javelin at a point adjacent its. attachment of the ferrule point, the outer surfaces of the. rectangular strips are planed or otherwise dressed away to form rather abrupt tapers and splints or laminations Hi, H are glued thereon, in a suitable manner.

The next step in shaping our javelin consists in cutting away surplus material to the end that the desired round and tapered shape resultsl Due to variances in woods and other requirements, the shaping of the javelin may vary slightly but all the time is. to be kept. as. close. to. the con-ventional as possible. Because of our use of the lighter, tough-fibered wood than is conventional, We are permitted to leave intact considerably more material in the central portion of the javelin, thus permittin us to provide a javelin having a hand grip large enough to be more readily gripped by the athlete with a large hand. During the cutting operation the laminated splints l0,- and H are trimmed and finishedto conform with the desired outside taper of the javelin. at the forward end and the. trailing ends of the pieces 6 and i are smoothed out into. a uniformly decreasing taper.

When the javelin has been shaped properly it is fitted to. a metallic pointed ferrule of the conventional type thathas been heated sufficiently to expand the bore 4 and when the wood has been inserted and the ferrule 3, permitted to contract, the ferrule closely grips and adheres to the forward end of the shaft.

as shoWrr in Figure 9 the shaft halves; 6'- and f and forward ends are provided with av slightly greater tapering: surfaceback; to a; point at which the wrapping, for: the hand; grip: is: to start. An

.pieces of a wood commonly known as Alaska abrupt shoulder is provided and the material reduced to the required diameter to provide the correct sized hand grip and thewrappings l3 are then made. In this manner it is possible to streamline the javelin and eliminate the. resistance that is normally present when the grip 5 is completely exposed, This streamlining is not possible except when wood of the characteristics described above is used, together with the interior opening whichrwe embody in our javelin.

By our construction weare ableto manufacture a javelin embodying theprinciples of strength inherent with tubes and the like, and of a sumc-ient large diameter throughout itslength to increase rigidity and to eliminate or reduce whipping or vibration. 7

It is to be understood that the form of our invention, herewith shown and described, is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the shape, size and arrangementv of partsmay be resorted to, without departingv from the spirit of our invention, or the scope of the subjoined claims.

Having thus fully described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A javelin comprising a hollow shaft tapered at each end, formed of two or more grooved strips of wood secured together with opposed grain structure and having laminated splints secured to. the head end of said shaft and shaped to conform, to the tapering contour of said head end, a javelin point affixed to the head end of said shaft enclosing a front portion of the shaft strips and the splints, and grip means about said shaft adjacent the longitudinal center of gravity of the shaft. I

2..A"javelin comprisinga hollow shaft fashioned of two ,or more strips of wood secured together with opposed grain structure, a javelin point secured to the forward end of said shaft, and grip means about said shaft adjacent the center of gravity.

3. A javelin comprising a hollow shaft fashioned of grooved strips. of wood secured together and tapered to each end, a javelin point secured to. the head end of saidshaft, grip. means about the longitudinal central portion of said shaft, and the diameter of said shaft forward of the grip tapering from the head end to a size 'approximately the outside diameter of said grip to reduce wind resistance when the javelin is thrown. i a

4:. A javelin comprising ahollow shaft formed of a multiple number of strips of wood secured together having a counterweight pocket in the trailing end portion of saidfshaft, a counterweight in said pocket, a javelin point affixed to the head end of said shaft and grip means about said shaft adjacent the longitudinal center of gravity of the javelin.

5. A javelin comprising a hollow shaft tapered at both ends and formed of two or more strips of wood secured together with opposed grain structure and having laminated splints secured to the head end of said shaft, a javelin point affixed to the head end of said shaft, and grip means about said shaft adjacent the longitudinal center ,of gravity of the javelin.

6. A'javelin comprising av hollow shaft tapered at both ends and formed of two or more strips of wood secured together and having laminated splints secured? to. the head end of said shaft, a javelinpoint aifixedto the head end of said shaft and over a front portion of the splints, and grip means about said shaft adjacent the longitudinal center of gravity of the javelin.

7. A javelin comprising a hollow shaft having closed and tapered ends, laminated splints se cured to the head end of the hollow shaft, a

javelin pointafiixed to said shaft and enclosing a portion of said splints, and grip means about said shaft adjacent the longitudinal center of gravity of the Javelin.

8. A javelin comprising a wooden shaft formed of a'pair of strips of wood secured together with the natural grain of :one strip in reverse to the natural 'grain of sthe other strip, both of said strips having been previously cut from a' single blank, a javelin point attached to'the forward end of said shaft, and grip means adjacent the longitudinal center of gravity of the shaft and its point. I

' -KARL A. SCI-ILADEMAN. I

' .U'RIDGE GLENN WHIFFENJ 10

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4333643 *Feb 19, 1980Jun 8, 1982Victor SaffireJavelin
US4337940 *Nov 17, 1980Jul 6, 1982Soong Tsai CJavelin
US4404053 *Dec 15, 1980Sep 13, 1983Victor SaffireMethod of making a javelin
US6585623 *Jan 25, 2000Jul 1, 2003Ute Hilmer-GabckeJavelin
US20150087479 *Sep 20, 2013Mar 26, 2015Juris TeraudsAthletic javelin with maximum moment of inertia
DE3619484A1 *Jun 10, 1986Dec 17, 1987Kuntze Angelgeraete DamJavelin for sporting purposes, and method for its production
WO1998018400A1 *Oct 31, 1997May 7, 1998Thomas Alan PetranoffA training javelin
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/20
International ClassificationA63B65/02, A63B65/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B65/02
European ClassificationA63B65/02