Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2196763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1940
Filing dateJan 21, 1938
Priority dateJan 21, 1938
Publication numberUS 2196763 A, US 2196763A, US-A-2196763, US2196763 A, US2196763A
InventorsFigg Jr Louis J
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid antiseptic soap
US 2196763 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Apr. 9, 1940 UNITED STATES mourn msi'risnr'rro soAP' Louis J. Fig Jr.,.'K ingsport, Tenn., assignor to Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, N. Y., a

corporationof New Jersey No Drawing. Application January 21, 1938,

Serial No. 186,099

8 Claims. (Cl. 87-5) I This invention relates to liquidsoap, and more particularly to a liquid soap with germicidal and fungicidal properties. i

One object of my invention is to provide a liquid soap with germicidal and fungicidalproperties. Another object to provide-a liquid,

jger'micidal' and fungicidal soap which may be saiay'usedon the human skin. will hereinafter appear, 1 This application is in part a continuation of my application Serial No. 739,505, filedAugust 11, 1 934. i I have discovered that a liquid-soap ofpowerful antiseptic properties, yet safe for use'on the humanskin, can beprepared by incorporating certain hardwood oils in the liquid soap. If

Other objects desired, pine-tar oil may be incorporated in thesoap along withthe hardwood oil.

The hardwo'od'oils which I prefer to use in preparing mynovel soap are derived from heavy hardwood oils and tars having boiling ranges from 170 C. to 310 C. These heavy oils and tars settle out of the rawpyroligneous acid which results from the destructive distillation of hardwood, and are known as settled tar. In order to, obtain the fraction which I prefer to use,

' I may, for example, charge these heavy oils and tars into a vacuumstill' heated by circulating oil, and fractionate them through a plate column of approximately 15 plates. I collect the fraction whose boiling range at atmospheric pressure is 180-240 0., approximately, andredistill it in a vacuum still heated by steam coils, collecting the fraction which, at atmospheric pressure, boils above 180 C. v

Instead of refining the hardwood oil ,by distillation, I may purify it by removing the neuaccomplished as follows.

tral oils by an alkali treatment. This may be A 5-l5% solution of sodium hydroxide is added to the hardwood-oil,

with stirring, until the mixture becomes alkaline., The neutral oils separate out, and sodium I salts of the acidic components of the wood oil are formed. The greater portion ofthe neutral oils is removed mechanically, and the remainder from 10mm 0.

diethylene glycol monomethyl ether, diethylene bonate and bicarbonate. The oils are, th steam distilled from' the mixture a If pine-tar oil, as Well as hardwood oil, is to be incorporated in the soap, it maybe found convenient to preparea homogeneous mixture of the pine-tar oil and thehardwood oil beforehand. When the hardwood; oil is purified by vacuum distillation, as described above, the mixture of pine-tar oil' and hardwood on may'conveniently be prepared as' follows. "Bine-t'ar oil, whose boiling range is between C. and 270 C.,'is added in desired proportions to the hardwood oil after the first vacuum fractionation of the hardwood oil, and the second vacuum distillation is carried out on the mixture of hardwood oil and pine -tar oil.

I may sometimes wish to incorporate a small amount of sulfur in the soap, in order to increase its fungicidal properties. I'have found that at temperatures from about l00l20 0., sulfur is soluble in hardwood oil up to 2% by weight, approximately. Hence, I may convenientlydissolve from 1% to 2% of finely divided sulfur in the hardwood oil or inthe mixture of hardwood and pine-tar oils, at a temperature of ,The liquid soap in whichlIincorporate the hardwood oil may suitably be liquidjsapo'nified coco'anut oil soap, which is'a standard material, obtainable on the open market. It is an aqueous solution containing'about 40% cocoanut oil soap. I find it desirable. to use a blending agent to facilitate the incorporation of the oils. The blending agent may be a lower tion, forexample: methanol, ethyl alcohol, propyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol, the butyl alcohols, the amyl alcohols, methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, propyl acetate, isopropyl acetate, the butyl acetates, the. amyl acetates, acetone, methyl ace tone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl propyl ketone, diethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, dibutyl ketone, methyl amyl ketone, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol, glycol monomethyl ether, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether, ethylene, glycol monobutyl ether,

ethylene I aliphatic alcohol, a lower aliphatic ester, a lower" 5' aliphatic ketone, a glycol, a lower aliphatic tain the proper consistency. Essential oils may be added to improve the odor, as is customary in soap making. I prefer to use the hardwood oils in such amount that they constitute from 0.5% to 33%, by volume, of the finished product. In particular, I prefer to use from to 15% of the hardwood oils.

By way of examples, I give below two specific formulaewhich I have found to be satisfactory for preparing a good germicidal and fungicidal soap.

Example I Per cent by volume Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 50.0 Hardwood oils -1 7.5 Pine-tar oil 7.5 Essential oils 3.0 Ethyl alcohol 11.0 Water 21.0

Example II Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 52 Hardwood oil-pine-tar oil mixture (1:1).... 12 Essential oils 1 Ethyl alco 15 Water 20 Ezample III Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 50.0 Caustic-soluble hardwood oil 15.0 Essential oils 3.0 Ethyl alcohol 11.0 Water 21.0

' Example IV Liquid saponified cocoanut oil soap 52 Caustic-soluble hardwood oil 12 Essential oils 1 Ethyl alcohol 15 Water 20 It will be understood that I am not to be limited by these examples except as indicated in the appended claims.

My novel disinfectant soap, while being harm: less to the human skin, has high bactericidal power. For instance, when the caustic-soluble hardwood oils described above are used, the bactericidal power conferred by them, apart from that conferred by any other ingredients of the soap, is as follows:

What I claim as my invention and desire to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

-1. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 0.5% to 33%, by volume, of hardwood 011 whose boiling range is between 180- C. and 240 .C., and a blending agent for the soap and the hardwood oil.

2. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 0.5% to 33%, by volume, of

caustic-soluble hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240 C., and a blending agent for the soap and the hardwood oil. 3.'A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 0.5% to 33%, by volume, of hardwood oil whose boiling vrange'is between 180 C. and-210 C., and ethyl alcohol. r

4. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from, 0.5% to 33%, by volume, of

caustic-soluble hardwood oil whose boiling range is between-180 C. and 240 C., and ethyl alcohol.

5. A liquid, antiseptic toiletsoap comprising 'l. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 5% to 15%, by volume, of hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240 C.. and ethyl alcohol.

8. A liquid, antiseptic toilet soap comprising soap, water, from 5% q to 15%, by volume, of caustic-soluble hardwood oil whose boiling range is between 180 C. and 240 C., and ethyl alcohol.

' LOUIS J. FIGG, JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3360471 *Apr 18, 1963Dec 26, 1967Sterling Drug IncBiodegradable cleaning compound
US3360476 *Mar 19, 1964Dec 26, 1967Fmc CorpLiquid heavy duty cleaner and disinfectant
US3870647 *Jun 5, 1972Mar 11, 1975Seneca Chemicals IncLiquid cleaning agent
US4414128 *Jun 8, 1981Nov 8, 1983The Procter & Gamble CompanyLiquid detergent compositions
US4477361 *Feb 22, 1983Oct 16, 1984Sperti Drug Products, Inc.Antifungal-antibacterial detergents containing cinnamic compounds
US5240708 *Jul 3, 1991Aug 31, 1993Plummer Donald EWhipping liquid soap to foam, adding capsicum, oils of anise and coriander
WO2014037167A1 *Aug 1, 2013Mar 13, 2014Unilever N.V.Soap composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/131, 510/463, 510/159, 510/505, 510/386, 424/725.1
International ClassificationC11D17/08, C11D9/38, C11D9/04, C11D3/48
Cooperative ClassificationC11D17/08, C11D9/38, C11D3/48
European ClassificationC11D3/48, C11D17/08, C11D9/38