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Publication numberUS2196807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 9, 1940
Filing dateJul 9, 1938
Priority dateJul 9, 1938
Publication numberUS 2196807 A, US 2196807A, US-A-2196807, US2196807 A, US2196807A
InventorsEckert Clarence R
Original AssigneeMetropolitan Roofing Supplies
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Waterproof covering roofs, etc.
US 2196807 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 9, 1940. Q R CKERT Y 2,196,807

` WATERPROOF COVERING ROOFS, 'ETC Filed July 9, 1958 M; ff. MQ INVENTOR f ATTORNEY.

Patented Apr. 9, 1940 UNITED sTATEs PATENT ori-*ICE Clarence R. Eckert, Englewood, N. J., assignor to Metropolitan Roofing Supplies Co., Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application July 9, 193s, serial No. 218,261

2 Claims.

This invention relates to a covering that is particularly useful for a flat roof or deck,- but it is not limited to such uses as it is also suitable for floors, playgrounds, tennis'courts, roadways, and the like.

It is well known that lattice work, wood slats, tile or blocks are placed for example on flat roofs and other places to provide surfaces that can be walked or traveled upon without injuring the underlying watertight layer or subsurface. In such cases whenV tile or blocks are used they are often cemented to the top side of the underlying watertight layer or surface by means of asphalt or tar or other waterproof cementitious material. The tile or blocks are usually laid with their edges close together but having small cracks in which water may collect and freeze causing upheaval or detachment of the tile or blocks from the undersurface and leaving them or at least some of them loose thereon. Besides, even in warm Weather the Weight of one stepping on a loosened tile or block under which water has collected sometimes causes geysers of water to spout out.

By the present invention the troubles or didiculties mentioned above aswell as other objections are overcome and, in addition, the danger of water passing through a roof deck or -other surface to which the invention is applied is greatly reduced. At the same time the life of the same is prolonged. Also, this invention provides a somewhat resilient area that is not slippery and is safe for pedestrians and vehicles.

In carrying out this invention waterproof tile or blocks that can be walked or traveled over are laid upon a roof deck, oor, or other surface with their edges near each other. Their edges are so shaped that sealing strips can be installed at the joints in such a manner as to provide a substantially smooth upper surface and prevent access of water between the edges of the tile or blocks and between these tile or blocks and the surface upon which they are laid.

The invention will be understood from the description in connection with the accompanying drawing in which Fig. 1 is a plan view partly broken away and with parts removed showing an illustrative embodiment of my invention; Fig. 2 is a plan view of one of the tile or blocks; Fig. 3 is a section along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is an exploded edge view of Fig. 1; and Fig. 5 is an end view of a modification of the tile or block shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

In the drawing, reference character I (Fig. 4) represents a roof deck, road way, or the like to which this invention is applied or by which it is covered. The portion I may be made waterproof initially in any of the Well known ways so that water cannot penetrate it.

-The portion I is covered with waterproof tile f or blocks 2 preferably of rectangular shape hav- 5 ing grooves 3 around their edges along their upper surfaces, with the edges 4 of adjacent blocks preferably in contact with each other. 'I'hese blocks or tile 2 may be made of any material that is resilient and wear resisting and can be made Water- 10 proof. For example, these blocks or tile 2 can be made of wood and can be waterproofed either before or after they are cut out or formed, or they can be made of manufactured fibrous material such as Celotex and saturated with water- 15 proof liquid or plastic material such as tar or asphalt. They may be nailed in place by nails near the corners, these nails being long enough to extend into but not through the portion I.

The blocks 2 do not have to be made in one 20 piece with grooves 3 along the edges, but can be easily constructed of two pieces 2' and 2" of dilerent sizes with the smaller one on top thus leaving the groove 3 around the edges so indicated. 25

The top surface of the portion I is preferably covered with a coating 5 of Waterproofing material before the tile or blocks 2 are laid. As they are pressed down a part of the cbating material 5 is pressed upward between the joints 4 as indicated at 6. A layer `l of liquid or plastic water-y proof material is applied to the grooves 3 after the tile 2 have been put in place and pressed down, and a series of long strips of waterproof saturated felt or the like is laid in the grooves 35 3 covering the joints 4 and rendering them more safe from the penetration of water. These strips 8 are preferably laid in the direction of the slope or drainage of the portion I. Short cross strips 4o 9 of the same sort are laid in the grooves 3 at right angles to the strips 8.

After the strips 8 and 9 have been put in the grooves 3 waterproof cementitious material I0 as shown at the right hand portion of Fig. 4 is 4 poured on top of these strips, and then long strips III, which may be made of the same sort of material as the blocks 2 and aremade waterproof for example by impregnating them with tar or asphalt or other waterproong material, are laid on the strips 8 and pressed down. Short strips I2- of the same sort are installed in the cross grooves 3 in the same manner with their ends against the edges of the strips II. The strips II and I2. are of such width and thickness that they .55

fit in the grooves I and their upper surfaces are flush with the upper surfaces of the blocks 2.

In the modification shown in Fig. the blocks I3 which are made of the same sort of material as the blocks 2 have the grooves I4 so made that the bottom sides thereof slope away from the edges 4 so that any water that might gain access to these grooves would tend to move away from the edges where cracks might be present, thus decreasing the chances for leakage.

If desired, the portions of the blocks 2 or 2' that lie below the bottoms of the grooves 3 or 3' can be trimmed off where they would come along the edges of the surfaces that are to be covered so that the Whole thickness of these blocks would be present at these edges.

What is claimed is:

1. A covering for waterproof surfaces, comprising a series of blocks of resilient waterproof material with grooves of substantial depth extending entirely around said blocks about their upper surfaces at their edges and with the edges of successive blocks adjacent each other, strips of flexible waterproof sheet material within said grooves and covering the joints between said edges of said blocks, and fillers of the same material as said blocks in said grooves on said strips with their upper surfaces substantially flush with the upper surfaces of said blocks.

2. A covering for waterproof surfaces, comprising a seriesof blocks of resilient waterproof material each made in two pieces of substantialv thickness'one larger than the other and assembled'so that the larger piece projects beyond the smaller on all edges to form grooves of substantial depth extending entirely around said blocks about their upper surfaces at their edges and with the edges of successive blocks adjacent each other, strips of iiexible waterproof sheet material within said grooves and covering the joints between said edges of said blocks, and fillers of the same material as said blocks in said grooves on said strips with their upper surfaces substantially flush with 20 the upper surfaces of said blocks.

CLARENCE n. ECKERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2491488 *Dec 29, 1945Dec 20, 1949Faulwetter Roy CPrecast screed strip
US2891492 *Aug 3, 1956Jun 23, 1959Anthony GerosaWaterproof covering for flat roofs and other flat surfaces
US4063395 *May 10, 1974Dec 20, 1977Grefco, Inc.Twin membrane, self sealing, mechanically fastened insulated roof deck system
US6363677 *Apr 10, 2000Apr 2, 2002Mannington Mills, Inc.Surface covering system and methods of installing same
US7975451 *Mar 18, 2005Jul 12, 2011Kronoplus Technical AgBordered panels, especially for walls and ceilings
US8635825 *Sep 5, 2012Jan 28, 2014Green Tech Products, LlcModular roof panels
US20130232899 *Sep 5, 2012Sep 12, 2013John C. BaconModular roof panels
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/464, 52/471, 52/416
International ClassificationE04D11/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D11/00
European ClassificationE04D11/00