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Publication numberUS2197874 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 23, 1940
Filing dateOct 22, 1938
Priority dateOct 22, 1938
Publication numberUS 2197874 A, US 2197874A, US-A-2197874, US2197874 A, US2197874A
InventorsElmer Myers Bryant
Original AssigneeElmer Myers Bryant
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptor for shower stalls
US 2197874 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 23, 1940.

B. E. MYERS 2,197,874 RECEPTOR FOR SHOWER sTALLs Filed Oct.. 22, 1938 I I I I I I I I I I vto Panarea Apr. 23, 1940 l' UNITED STAT-E5 PATENTS OFFICE I' k nsonr'ron Fon SHOWER j.

y y Bryant yElmer,ltdyrers, Santa Barbara, 'jf Ap'plimtimnl october 22, issakseriralr N. 236,428

" 15 Claims. (o1. 'fi- 1426) l This invention relates to'tirnprovements in shower-.stallreceptors. Thernaintobjects of l.my

:invention are to provide a one-piece shower stall receptorof improved` materialvand structurel;v to ,provide ay device of lthis characterwherein 'the lside Walls of the stall extend to the -floor of re# ceptor whereby the lower portion of the showerk stall wide walls areall Within thearea of the sidewalls of the receptor; to provide a receptor 'having adequate walls and drainage means to ycollect theshoitferv water and the condensation.y seeping through the showerside ywalls and dis.

charge this moisture 'throughthe outlet drain'in vtheiloorfof the receptor-'to provide a seamless, integrally formed, resilient but substantially rigid receptor; to provide vva shower stall freceptor whereiny the'walls of which'are hidden from View l. when installed; to provide :a `water-proof asphaltun^.lil-:e' and slip-proof receptor floor; toco'mpound a new and improved material for conf of asphalt andiillers for constructing lshower stall receptors; to provide a one-piecemolded receptor? oor which is simplein'constructon, comparatively inexpensive to'rnanufacture, vlightl in` weight Yin comparison Ywithlmown receptors, and which. will not befsubje'ctu'to chemicalfactionor deterioration and subsequent leaking,

Anillustrative ,embodiment of this invention .is shown lin the accompanying drawing', in which:

trally through the lower part of a shower "bath stall showingv my improvedreceptor.

Flg. 2 -is a fragmentali perspective viewof said` v 3 is an enlarged/axial cross-section through.

the ontlet'drain and the adjacent fittings, taken substantially as shown in Fig. l.

" Fig. 4 is-across-seotional view of a mold, wherefr in the lreceptor unit is cast'.

Referring in furtherdetail'to vthe drawing, my

molded receptor Iis made of'primari'ly `waterprooi cementiti'ous' asphalt -or a composition oi asphaltl and fillers,v `such 4as silica sand, puniice, d

dietomaceous earth, asbestos, fibres, etc., preferably compoulniedy of 49%,asphalt,f17% diatomaceous earth, and 34% pumica'thcroughly admixed properly heatedfso as to moldfreadily.' l The'reoeptor itselfcornprises a bottom member lhaving `four integralupstanding side walls 2 y which continuous around the receptor.

In molding the receptor a stripy of reinforcing` material'such as metal lath 3 is embedded in the side. walls?? so as to reinforce the same substantially. The bottom member l comprises a rub- 5 The [purpose of the matting! is to providea slip-prooftreador floor covering, and ther purpose l of vthe insulation board@I is to cooperate witht'the composition 5 to keep the vreceptor -irom'lo'e'coml ing'heated or frorn'chilling due to drafts playing are indicated ygen.'-

the bott'o'rnan inwardlyl extending lilange 9 in-` t'eg'fral'therewith-, and atthe'top an outwardlyjex:`

tendlngintegralfflange Il), the purposes of `which `1will hereinafter be'described. Lli'iwardly disposed lugs' llareio'rmed in and 'adjacent the upper end of sleeve .3 and are verticallyI tapped to provide ror'neansjto retainfthe perforated drain 'cover ,'llinpositiononthefloon'asscrews I3.

` Whenf itis desired to install my receptor inf-a" shower stall, it li'sset in "the stall frame as v'shown `in Fig. 11;" thatis, v'softlfiat'ime outer face edges of ythe sidewallsf'are positioned adjacent studs' I4'. The drain B Yisfthen -caulked,"a's generally indi.-

v berm'attmgtef a similar mettermi, theiccmposition y5"'a'Jo'ov`e set forth, and an insulationboard y 6 of appropriate material.

cated at 22, 'to the sewerlirre 'Hf Y The shower k y stall walls are'thenplastere'd in the' usual manner,

as generally indicated by the numeral l5. lAs'Wll lhe apparent froinFig. l1, the `plaster may extend v t y down to' .the face of` the bottomY member I of v.the 'Flgurel is a vertical sectional view taken ce-nreceptor. .The shower stall walls Tm'ay then be tiled oriinished in "the usual manner 'and the vtiling'or iinishing H5 may also 'extend tovthe face 'of the bottoinmemher i.' lThis guardspositively v t against lateral leakage.

7plaster I-'fzi generally becomes saturated and' after l several saturations or wettings,l the Water and condensation tend I to ilow' downwardly t behind the tiles.'v In'old installations thiswat'er usually lfound its -Wayto the floor sills andstudding's' and intime rotted them as' wellas the Woodwork' and t yi'loo'ring."'IByl employing my present invention,

this isprevented; for whatever water leaks through the stall walls iti-lli will be intercepted 'bythe receptor` sidewalls 2 and `will beV guided downwardly along the inner face thereof and 'be directed to the bottom. member l where ituwill be .drained off v'through the vusual sewer drain l1.

Such lealrages' are yconilned substantially `to the lower part of the stall walls and'rny improved re'- ceptor takes care o'fthis.-

f For the purpose of guidingwat'er andcondensa'- tion down the inner sides of the walls 2, the inner faces are inclined inwardly toward the bottom, as is apparent from Fig. 1.

In producing my improved receptor, I employ a mold 2| such as is shown in Fig. 4, and build up or preform my receptor in the following manner:

First I centrally perforate the rubber mat or sheeting '4 and fasten it to the drain structure and lockit in position against the flange l0. by tightening the lock-nut washer I9. `I then place the metal lath 3 in each of the side wall cavities 20, and then ll the cavities 2B with pure asphalt. The rubber matting 4 is then placed top'face down in the mold. The mold 2| is next substantially filled with the composition herenbefore described..

While the composition is still in liquid form,A

the insulation board 6, having first been appropriately cut out centrally to provide for the drain structure, is then placed in the composition` close tothe surface` j The mold then is Ai'llled with pure asphalt flush with the top and smoothed o;

floor to safeguard a shower bather from slipping.

When constructing a new building, Where shower stalls are to be provided, the usual sewer vdrain i7 is customarily set in the-center portion of the shower stall, so 'that when installing the receptor it is only necessary to set the same on the oor beams or sub-flooring as the case may be. I

vIt is also customary to remove the drain cover plate I2 temporarily and fill the portionaround the protruding upper end of the drain vwith a water-proofing filler material 22; suchy as caulking compound and lead or the like, and for this purpose I have provided an inwardly extending flange 9 on the sleeve 8 to act as a form for retaining the filler material.

It will be seen that shower stall walls may vary in thickness as the receptor is built to conform substantially to the standard spacing of the studs I4 and not to the spacing of 'the inside faces of the shower stall walls. It will also be seen that the entire `lower part of the shower stall walls is located Within the receptor walls, so that in the event of water seepage through-the tiling -joints or cracks in the shower stall walls, the water seeping through will be caught in the receptor. being seamless and also being sufficiently flexible, due to the material from which it is made, cannot crack or leak at any time. The tread on the rubber matting provides a slip-proof safety feature. 'I'he edges of the rubber mat 4 are waterproofed and held in place by being setl in the asphalt, as at 23. matting, holding it down.` The lower edge of the plaster l5 and tiling I6 bears thereon.

Another advantage of the present receptor is that its weight is cut down to a minimum and the receptor is a great deal lighter than receptors heretofore used or on the market today, `and therefore easier and less costly to install. Also, as will be apparent, the vcost of producing this unit is relatively small'due to the low cost of the materials used. VMetal receptors and Waterproofing shower stall pans arealways subject to The receptor,

The asphalt adheres tothe rusting and other chemical oxidizing action;

therefore, they are always constantly subject to leakage. It will therefore be apparent, because of the materials used in my improved receptor,

It can also readily be seen that it is not, especially essential'to incorporate the slip-proof rubber matting in the unit when vit is molded; but

because of its desirability, it. canbe applied to is perthe floor after the receptor is installed, thereby "i making it removable and renewable at any time.

It is also to be understoodthat any other suitable` material may be substituted for this rubber matting, if desired, Without departing from the spirit of the'invention, as 'it isv to be understood that `:floor tiling might readily be substituted therefor if another type of floor covering is demanded.

It should also be understood that the side Walls of the receptor may be-,formed of any waterproof material, such as -metal or concrete, but that in order to insure that the Vspirit of this invention. is not lost, the walls, regardless of the material,` should be molded to the bottom .member and be substantially integraltherewith in effect.

It should be understood that the asphalt or a composition including asphalt could be altered or changed Without departing from the spirit of this'invention, as long as asphalt orother material having the properties and characteristics of asphalt whichl arev necessary in'making waterproof shower receptors is used as awater-proofing, molding, or bonding material in) making shower receptors. I

Iclaim: v 1 l. A vreceptor for shower stalls including a bottorn member having' four integral side: walls eX- tending upwardly therefrom and being continuf ousv around said receptor', said receptor being molded from a materialconsisting of an admiX- ture of asphalt, pumice, and diatomaceous earth.

2. A- receptor for shower stalls including a bottom member having four integral side walls j extending upwardly therefrom andlbeing con- 145 f tinuous around said receptor, said receptor being molded from a material consisting of an admiXf ture of substantially 49% asphalt7 34% pumice,

and 17% diatomaceous earth. i 1 3. A receptor for shower stalls-including a bottom member havingfour integral, side walls 4. A lreceptor for shower stalls'including a bottom member having four integral` side walls` extending upwardly therefrom and being continuous around said receptor, said receptor being vmolded from a compoimd'material, the principal ingredient of which is asphalt.

5. In a resilient molded shower stall receptor,

a bottom* member having four integral wallsextending upwardly therefrom and being continuous around saidreceptor, said bottom member and wall members comprising an 'admixture 'of l l asphalt, pumice, and diatomaceous earth, said wall membershaving la greater cross-sectional area adjacent the lbottom member than at the upper edge portion thereof wherebythe inner faces thereof lie in a 'diagonalplane.-

6. A receptor for shower stalls comprising a` bottom mem-ber and -upwardly extending integral f IIL side walls, said side" wallsqbeingcontinuous around the receptor, the area bounded by said side walls being greater than the area. bounded bythe lower edgev of the shower stall side walls,

said receptor being formed in a mo-ld from a compound material comprising solid masses of a illerl material in combination with anasphaltic binder.

7. A receptor for shower stalls comprising a bottom member and upwardly extending integral side walls, said side walls being continuous around the receptor, the area bounded by said side walls being materially greater than the area lbounded, by the lower shower stall `sidewalls,

said bottom member having an insulated reinforcing means on its lower side and a tread covering on its upper side, said means and coverjing being permanently bonded to said bottom member. i y

8. A preformed receptor for shower stalls comprising an admixturelof a solid filler material and an asphaltc binder disposed between a reinforcing material and a water-proof 'material 9. A preformed receptor for showerv stalls kcomprising an admixturel of a solid ller material and anasphaltic'binder containing a sheet or reinforcing insulator material.

10. A preformed receptor `for shower stalls lcomprising an admixture of a-solid filler ma-v terial and an asphaltic binder faced` off with a vslip-preventing covering.

11. A receptor for shower stallscomprising a bottom member having four integral side walls extending upwardly therefrom, reinforcing means in each off said side walls and's'aid bottom member, said receptor being molded from a mabottom member having four integral side walls` i extending upwardly therefrom and being continuous around said receptor, saidbo-ttom being molded from a material consisting of solid masses of a filler material and an asphaltic binder therefor, and said side walls being of a water-r proof material.

14. A receptor forl shower stalls comprising a bottom member and upwardly extending integral side walls, said side walls being continuous around the receptor, said bottom member comprising a Water-proof thermoplastic material, said side walls comprising a water-proof material.

15. A light weight thermoplastic receptor for vshower stalls comprising a base-plate having upstanding side wallsA to snugly embrace the lower end of the shower stall walls peripherally.'

throughout, said receptor being molded as a whole of asphaltic material with reinforcing means and having a central drain aperture in its base.

BRYANT EIMER

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2437068 *Oct 5, 1944Mar 2, 1948Porcelain Metals CorpDrain connector for shower bath receptors
US2836830 *Apr 16, 1957Jun 3, 1958Norman Glenn ETile receptor for showers
US3045254 *May 5, 1961Jul 24, 1962Robert G CookBathtub with liner
US3668718 *Aug 24, 1970Jun 13, 1972Cuschera CasperDrain connection
US3675384 *Mar 13, 1970Jul 11, 1972Knecht Walter LFlooring construction
US3724158 *Dec 14, 1971Apr 3, 1973Knecht WMethod for repairing flooring construction
US3869735 *Mar 15, 1974Mar 11, 1975D Amato Nicholas JShower door saddle
US4745712 *Nov 10, 1986May 24, 1988Australian Stratacore Holdings Ltd.Building system for multi-storey buildings
US4993201 *Apr 26, 1989Feb 19, 1991Robert BunyardPre-cast stall shower panel assembly
US5248219 *Feb 3, 1992Sep 28, 1993Enviroland, Inc.Sewage tank system and method of construction
US5768842 *Jun 28, 1996Jun 23, 1998Austin; Robert M.Weep drain for tile walls
US5845347 *Sep 18, 1996Dec 8, 1998Young; David A.Method of manufacturing shower foundation
US7823349Aug 11, 2009Nov 2, 2010Alexander Ernest EMasonry wall vent
US8112831May 11, 2009Feb 14, 2012Cook Joseph RMethods of manufacturing and installation of prefabricated shower benches and associated shower benches
US8141182Mar 17, 2007Mar 27, 2012Cook Joseph RMethod of manufacturing and installation of prefabricated shower bench and associated shower bench
US8141183Mar 17, 2007Mar 27, 2012Cook Joseph RMethod for manufacturing a prefabricated modular shower curb and associated modular shower curb
US8181286Mar 17, 2007May 22, 2012Cook Joseph RDrain wall for a prefabricated shower module
US8209795Mar 17, 2007Jul 3, 2012Cook Joseph RPrefabricated shower pan having varying sidewall heights and method of attaching a modular curb
US8307582Feb 17, 2010Nov 13, 2012Tile Redi, LlcShower enclosure design and assembly methods using prefabricated shower benches
US8375480Mar 17, 2007Feb 19, 2013Tile Redi, LlcMethod for manufacturing a prefabricated shower module
US8561224Feb 17, 2010Oct 22, 2013Joseph B. CookHandicapped accessible shower enclosure with ramp and/or floor pan
US8789217Jan 17, 2012Jul 29, 2014Joseph R. CookMethods of manufacturing and installation of prefabricated shower benches and associated shower benches
US8789316May 5, 2009Jul 29, 2014Joseph R. CookWaterproof juncture
US9049969Nov 12, 2012Jun 9, 2015Tile Redi, LlcShower enclosure design and assembly methods using prefabricated shower benches
US9167940Feb 22, 2012Oct 27, 2015Joseph R. CookMethod of manufacturing and installation of prefabricated shower bench and associated shower bench
US20050262785 *May 24, 2005Dec 1, 2005Alexander Ernest EMasonry wall vent
US20060112483 *Nov 30, 2005Jun 1, 2006Walker Victor LSpa lighting system
US20080222793 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcRibbed prefabricated polyurethane shower module
US20080222794 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcMethod of manufacturing and installation of prefabricated shower bench and associated shower bench
US20080222795 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcDrain wall for a prefabricated shower module
US20080222796 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcMethod for manufacturing a prefabricated modular shower curb and associated modular shower curb
US20080222797 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcPrefabricated shower pan having varying sidewall heights and method of attaching a modular curb
US20080222891 *Mar 17, 2007Sep 18, 2008Tile Redi, LlcMethod for manufacturing a prefabricated shower module
US20090293394 *Aug 11, 2009Dec 3, 2009Alexander Ernest EMasonry wall vent
US20100175761 *Jul 15, 2010Schlueter-Systems KgMounting plate
US20110197351 *Feb 17, 2010Aug 18, 2011Cook Joseph RHandicapped accessible shower enclosure with ramp and/or floor pan
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/613, 52/265, 52/35, 52/264
International ClassificationA47K3/28, A47K3/40
Cooperative ClassificationA47K3/281, A47K3/40
European ClassificationA47K3/40, A47K3/28B